Tag Archives: Winfield Street Coffee

Roundup: Cribari Bridge, Charlie Capalbo, WTF, More

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1st Selectman Jim Marpe has issued a correction about the state Department of Transportation’s plans for the William F. Cribari Bridge. He says that deputy commissioner Mark Rolfe has not yet reached a final decision on the 5 alternatives under consideration.  In addition, the draft Environmental Assessment will not be released mid-March. It is at least a few months away.

Rolfe says, “The DOT seeks to continue the dialogue with stakeholders regarding this project. One potential solution is for the DOT to restore the existing bridge to a state of good repair and then transfer ownership of the bridge and a segment of Route 136 to the Town of Westport.”

Marpe noted that any DOT recommendation — when it occurs — will be subject to further review and approval.

William F. Cribari Bridge (Drone photo/John Videler for Videler Photography)

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Maple sugar and tree tapping. Kids’ cooking classes. How to raise a dog. The wonderful world of honeybees.

Those are  just some of the offerings at Wakeman Town Farm, in the weeks ahead. The sustainability center contains to sustain all of us, with programs and classes for every age. Click here for details.

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Charlie Capalbo  — the 22-year-old Fairfield hockey player and grandson of Westport writer Ina Chadwick — has been diagnosed with leukemia.

The local Two Oh Three team is helping him, in his 3rd cancer battle.

The Westport-based firm has designed a line of products to raise both funds and awareness. Charlie has collaborated on the design process — a welcome distraction has he undergoes treatment.

The collection — #CapalboStrong — features products that help the community show Charlie that they’re all in this fight with him. Funds from products sold are assist Capalbo’s medical and travel expenses, while at Boston Children’s Hospital.

The collection was launched Sunday, to his network of friends. Hundreds of orders poured in. The Two Oh Three has now launched the custom designs on their full website.

Charlie says, “Seeing people ordering gear with my Capalbo Strong logo makes me feel connected to the outside world– like I know my army of friends and family are with me, even though I can’t see them now due to COVID-19. I’m so excited for this!”

“Our daily FaceTime calls with Charlie have been rewarding beyond words,” says Two Oh Three co-founder and Staples High School graduate Roscoe Brown.

“Constantly updating him on the number products we’ve sold helps remind him just how many people he has fighting along side him.”

Click here for the Two Oh Three #CapalboStrong Collection.

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Bob Stefanowski lost his race for Connecticut governor in 2018. But he’s a winner now, promoting area restaurants during COVID with a series of “Let’s Save CT Restaurants” videos.

His latest features Winfield Street Coffee, with owner Breno Donatti. It was filmed at their Stamford location — not the Post Road West shop — but it’s worth a watch.

Breno talks about the many ways that — despite the pandemic — Winfield Street gives back to the community, from providing meals for the homeless to sponsoring a holiday toy drive.

Here’s the quick video. When you’re done watching, place an order!

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The Staples boys basketball team opened its home season yesterday with a victory over Westhill.

The only way to watch the win was on the livestream. Spectators are prohibited from gyms this winter, in all high school sports.

But the stands were “filled” — with fatheads. That’s the name for cardboard figures of fans. It’s a way to make the gym a little less lonely. It’s also a great fundraiser for the Staples Boys Basketball Association.

How many folks do you recognize in the photo below? Besides (of course) me — directly underneath the “E.”

(Photo/Dan Woog)

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Christmas is long over. But Anthropologie’s giraffe remains penned in, between the store and Church Lane. Animal lovers, please help!

(Photo/Amy Schneider)

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And finally … here’s wishing Ed Sheeran a “perfect” 30th birthday today.

 

Winfield Street Deli: Despite Downturn, Donating Back

When COVID hit, it wasn’t just the coffee-and-lunch crowd that cratered at Winfield Street Deli.

They lost nearly all their catering contracts too. Breakfast and lunch deliveries to nearby offices had accounted for 30% of the popular Post Road West shop’s revenue.

Owner Breno Donatti made a quick decision. He closed completely, and helped employees get unemployment.

On May 15, Winfield Street reopened. “I couldn’t stay shut forever,” Breno says. “A lot of the staff wanted to get back to work. People were starting to come out from their homes.”

Breno devised a new catering menu. Breakfast boxes came individually wrapped; lunches of wraps, rolls, bowls and salads were separate too.

“People were trickling back to the office. They wanted to be safe,” the owner recalls. “Communal meals, with everyone grabbing something, no longer works.”

Winfield Delimobile

At the same time Winfield Street was struggling to stay in businesses, they were giving back. Realizing that people in shelters had less access to good food than ever — donations were down, and helping organizations were themselves hurting — Breno made some calls.

“Our staff was ready to work. And thanks to our wholesalers, we had access to great prices,” he say.

For every customer check of $20 or more, Winfield Street donates one meal.

By the end of December, the deli had provided 6,000 meals to Pacific House, Domus Kids and Inspirica.

Breno Donatti

Breno is not letting up. His goal for 2021: 21,000 meals. Sparked by a generous donation from former gubernatorial candidate Bob Stefanowski and his wife Amy, he’s well on his way.

Meanwhile, both retail and catering are picking up. For all of last quarter, business was down 40 percent compared to the year before. Last month, that was cut to just 15%.

The other day, the Coleytown Middle School PTA raved about Winfield’s catering for a teacher appreciation event. They delivered 55 breakfasts and 88 lunches.

“Any excuse to make people happy is important,” Breno says. “We need positive stories.”

And Winfield Street is at the top of any list.

(To donate meals through Winfield Deli to area shelters, click here. Special offer: For every 200 meals you provide, you get a $100 Winfield gift card.)

Roundup: Library, Winfield Deli, Wedding, More


The Westport Library — the town’s savior after tropical storm Isaias, thanks to its life-giving free WiFi available on Jesup Green and in the upper parking lot — reopened yesterday, primarily for device-charging and internet access.

The great space looked different. Users wore masks, and were spaced far apart. Most “touch surfaces” are unavailable.

But it was another godsend for Westporters. No one complained.

The library will be open again today from 12 noon to 6 p.m., for browsing and device-charging. There is curbside service from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

(Photo/Lauren MacNeill)


As soon as Breno Donatti’s phone camera alerted him last night that the power was back on at Winfield Street Coffee, the owner hustled to his Post Road West deli.

He and his staff spent hours cleaning the store, and calling vendors to get deliveries this morning.

“We hope customers hang in there. We may not have some items, but we’re replacing all of the food inventory.”

What a year this has been, for small businesses like Winfield Street. And what great lengths they go to serve us, whenever and however they can.


Because of COVID, it was already going to be a smaller scale wedding than expected. Then Isaias blew in.

But love conquers all. Despite the devastation (and lack of power), Tammy Barry’s nephew Nicholas married Audrey here on Friday evening.

It was intimate. It was beautiful. It was “love”-ly.

Life may be dark. But we can always find silver linings.


The other day, “06880” ran a photo of signs at the Colony Road/Pumpkin Hill intersection, pleading for Eversource post-Isaias help.

Yesterday, the signs changed. As the one on the left noted, they are now “signs of happiness.”

(Photo/Wendy Cusick)


Meanwhile, I’m not sure if this sign predates Isaias, or has been up for a while. But its message is powerful.

The free masks are equally helpful too.

(Photo/Amy Schneider)


And finally …

COVID Roundup: “Parade”; “Taps”; Restaurant Info; Kelli O’Hara; More


If you’re like many Westporters, missing today’s Memorial Day parade was tough.

If you lived near downtown though, you were in luck.

Neighborhood kids were invited to decorate bikes. They rode — appropriately apart — from Wright Street to Orchard Lane, Ludlow Road and Kings Highway North. Over 40 youngsters (and a few parents) took part.

Spectators stood on their porches, and clapped. There was a street party afterward — still socially distant, but able to celebrate in the new old-fashioned way.

(Photo/Anne Hardy)


At 3 p.m. today (Memorial Day), a bugler will play “Taps” on the plaza between Saugatuck Sweets and The Whelk. It’s part of “Taps Across America,” a project initiated by CBS “On the Road” correspondent Steve Hartman.

Masked, appropriately distanced residents are invited to attend.

“Taps,” at Westport’s 2015 Memorial Day ceremony.


Todd Pines has been thinking about our dining scene. He writes:

“While restaurants are starting to open with limited capacity, most business is likely to be takeout  for the foreseeable future. Ordering through behemoth delivery services (Uber Eats, Grubhub, etc.) takes an enormous split of the tab, further challenging restaurants’ ability to survive.

“Residents should understand the small impact they can make by calling a restaurant directly, seeing if they offer their own delivery staff. You can also consider getting in your own car, and picking up your meal directly. It means a lot to the restaurant owner.”

For a deep dive into delivery services, click here.

PS: Todd adds, “For the entrepreneurial-minded, a lot of college students and high school seniors are looking for work. They could help those restaurants with delivery, pocketing the tips while not forcing restaurants to discount their tab.”

Layla’s Falafel offers great food — and they have their own delivery service. Ordering direct helps them stay in business.


Speaking of which: Winfield Street Coffee is back open, just over the downtown bridge. Hours are 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. for breakfast, lunch and catering. There’s takeout, curbside pickup, delivery, and a few new seats on the sidewalk.

Also new: a “Reserved Parking/To Go Orders Only” sign, right in front. In these times when local businesses need all the help they can get — they’re getting it!


One of the underrated treasures of any Memorial Day is the PBS concert, broadcast from Washington, DC. It’s America at its best.

Last night’s show was different. The pandemic canceled the live show, so musical guests appeared on tape, from all over the country.

And right there among them was Westport’s own Kelli O’Hara. The Tony Award winner delivered a haunting rendition of “Fire and Rain.” Its refrain “but I always thought that I’d see you again” — juxtaposed against scenes of loved ones visiting graves of the men and women they’d lost — provided some of the most powerful moments of the entire evening.


And finally … as the coronavirus kept us apart today, let’s look back on a great Westport tradition. Here’s the Staples High School band in 2013, with their rousing Memorial Day “Armed Forces Salute.”

Pasta Place Goes; Pizza Bar Comes

Pasta lovers said grazie when Grana Pastificio opened in a corner of Winfield Street Coffee, across from the train station.

In a rapidly changing town, the old-world, fresh pasta place seemed a throwback to Saugatuck’s Italian roots.

After only a year, the Grana guys moved out.

There’s a good reason: They now serve 15 restaurants, and make 250 pounds of pasta a day. They needed a bigger facility. (You can still order online, and pick up your order at Winfield’s coffee shop.)

The space will not be empty for long. The new tenant should also be welcomed by old Saugatuck hands — as well as anyone else who loves good Italian food.

Graziano and Maurizio Ricci — owners of 2 Romanacci Pizza Bar restaurants (in Norwalk and Trumbull), and 2 Osteria Romanas (Norwalk and Monroe) — have wanted to open a Westport location for years.

This new spot will be a Romanacci. It will serve breakfast, lunch and dinner. In the morning, a “breakfast pizza” will complement Winfield’s coffee.

The brothers are finalizing their permits now. They hope to be ready around Labor Day.

Winfield owner Breno Donatti says, “They’re cool guys. They know what they’re doing. I’m happy to share the space with them.”

Commuters, Saugatuck residents, and all the rest of us should be happy he’s sharing the space too.

Beach Stickers: Good For Businesses?

Like all Westporters, Bruno Donatti and his wife love Compo.

In fact, they love it so much, they run 2.2 miles from their place to the beach — with a stroller and baby on board.

It’s nice exercise, and keeps them in shape.

Of course, they’d be there more often if they had a beach sticker.

The reason they don’t is because they are Westporters during the day only. They own 2 fantastic businesses: Winfield Street Italian Deli, just over the Post Road bridge (formerly Art’s), and Winfield Street Coffee, across from the train station.

The Winfield Street Deli on Post Road West.

Bruno and his staff are fully invested in Westport. They donate to every good cause. They’re part of the community. Their customers love them.

So Bruno — who lives with his wife and baby in Stamford — has a good question.

“Should a business owner like me be allowed a beach sticker? I pay property taxes on all of my equipment to the town.”

He’s looking to buy a house in town. But moving here is not easy.

What do you think, “06880” readers? Should business owners be allowed to buy a beach sticker at the Westport rate? Or at a special discounted price? Click “Comments” below.

And when you’re done, head to either of Winfield’s locations. They’re worth a detour from anywhere — even the beach.

Flowers Pop Up By Railroad Tracks

Last Friday, “06880” readers were lamenting the loss of Daybreak’s greenhouse — and the many back-in-the-day flower shows that made Westport look (and smell) wonderful.

We’ve still got some great florists here.

Now — just in time for Easter — there’s one more spot to buy gorgeous arrangements.

But you better hurry. It’s a pop-up shop.

Owner Breno Donatti has added Rowayton-based Stems + Co flowers to his Winfield Street Coffee, across from the train station.

Stems + Co. flowers, at Winfield Street Coffee.

Bouquets are available for $35. You get a free cup of coffee too.

They’re there only through April 24, though.

Then they disappear. Like Brigadoon.

Or Daybreak.