Tag Archives: Westport Library

Roundup: Library Reopens; Oh Brother!; More


The Westport Library’s limited reopening begins Monday (July 13).

In-person services include borrowing of books, audiobooks, movies, and magazines; visits to the Children’s Library to borrow materials; access to Express computers for 20-minute sessions, and in-person reference and reader’s advisory services.

Hours are weekdays 2 to 6 p.m., Saturdays from 12 to 4 p.m.

Precautions will keep staff and patrons safe. Patrons must wear masks, and are asked to keep visits short.

Meeting and conference rooms, the café and store will not be available. Most seatin ghas been removed from the media studios and MakerSpace, and near scanners, copiers and printers. Newspapers will not be available, but magazines can be checked out. For more information, click here.


If it had nothing else going for it besides its name, “Oh, Brother, Not Another Podcast!” should be in the Media Hall of Fame.

But there’s plenty more. Miggs Burroughs and his (of course) brother (and fellow artist) Trace regularly regale listeners with interesting banter and plenty of surprises.

They might outdo themselves on Thursday, July 23 (7 p.m.). They’re hosting a special event, live from the Westport Library.

Of course, anyone anywhere in the world can tune it. There are great guests, videos, interactive quizzes, and a few “celebrity” surprises.

It’s all free. But click here to register.


This week’s #FridayFlowers enhance the entrance to the Lillian Wadsworth Arboretum, off Stonybrook Road adjacent to Earthplace.

It’s fitting. In the 1950s the land was made available to the town by Wadsworth, an artist, sculptor, philanthropist and member of the Westport Garden Club — the organization responsible for each week’s flower arrangement, somewhere in town.

Both the arboretum and Earthplace have walking trails, and are open to the public.

(Photo/Topsy Siderowf)


And finally … On this day in 1962, the satellite Telstar was launched from Cape Canaveral. It beamed live television from Europe to the United States.

Roundup: Library Reopens; Craig Melvin; Dirty Dancing; Yankee Doodle Fair; More


The reimagined Westport Library was a spectacular success. For a few months, it was packed with users, jammed with events, pulsing with energy.

Then COVID-19 struck.

But 4 months after it closed, the library is poised to reopen. The big date is Monday, July 13.

Limited services begin, weekdays (2 to 6 p.m.) and Saturdays (12 to 4 p.m.). Only 100 people — including staff — will be allowed in the building at any time.

Masks are required. The only entrance is the main one (upper parking lot). The only exit is through the café.

The café and store are not open. Conference and meeting rooms will also be closed. Computer access will be limited to the Express stations.

Curbside pickup services continues weekdays (10 a.m. to 1 p.m.).

The library will extend loan periods, but fines will accrue for materials not returned within the loan periods.

The library will continue to offer virtual programs and services, while phasing in the full reopening of the building.


During these disconnected times, Dave Briggs — former CNN, NBC Sports and Fox anchor (and proud Westporter) — has conducted a series of Instagram Live interviews with interesting residents.

Folks like 1st Selectman Jim Marpe, restaurant owner Bill Taibe and former NFL quarterback/ESPN analyst Dan Orlovsky talk about the town, the pandemic, and answer questions from followers.

Today’s guest (Thursday, July 2) is Craig Melvin. The NBC “Today” host has been square in the middle of both the COVID and racial unrest stories.

Just follow @westportmagazine on Instagram, and click on the “Live” tab at the top of their feed at 4:30 for a fascinating chat. It will be reposted later by Dave (@davebriggstv).

Craig Melvin


There are no fireworks at Compo Beach to celebrate the 4th. BUT … there is a great movie at Westport’s own drive-in!

The Remarkable Theater shows “Dirty Dancing” at the Imperial Avenue parking lot. The classic summer romance/dance film begins at 8:45 p.m. on Saturday (the 4th). The lot opens at 7:45, and pre-film content starts at 8:15.

Tickets are $50 per car. Click here to purchase.

It’s a great movie. Even if it’s not “Independence Day,” or “Born on the 4th of July.”


COVID knocked out this year’s Yankee Doodle Fair. But the annual Westport Woman’s Club fundraiser has been around for a century. It will be back next year.

And if you want your Fair fix, check out this video shot last year by interns from Fourth Row Films. It premiered last week, at the Remarkable Theater’s opening night drive-in movie benefit for the WWC.

if you’re inspired by the video — or just want to help provide much-needed funds for the Woman’s Club community grants, scholarships, food pantry and other great causes — click here.


Want to win the war on invasive weeds?

That’s the topic of the next “Pollinator Series” online presentation from Wakeman Town Farm.

This Monday (July 6, 7-8 p.m.), University of Connecticut advanced master gardener Alice Ely will spotlight a guide to invasives, developed by WTF’s 2020 senior class interns.

Click here to register. Registrants will be emailed a Zoom link the day of the talk. Everyone gets a free guide to the area’s worst weeds too.


Missed the benefit cabaret that Staples High School senior Jamie Mann organized for Obi Ndefo — the actor/inspiration/friend who lost both legs when hit by a drunk driver?

Here’s your chance. Just click below. The sound is not great at the start, but it gets better. The performances, back story and messages are well worth it!


And finally … another fun summertime classic.

Roundup: Cupcakes; Teens’ Filmmaking Camp; Teens Drive; More


A Westport family wants to honor Staples High School’s Class of 2020 graduates. Fortunately, they live along the route that seniors will take tomorrow, as they drive from Long Lots Elementary School to the ceremony.

They’ve baked enough nut-free cupcakes for every grad. They’ll give them away — masked and gloved! — at 36 Hyde Lane, right before the turn on to Long Lots Road.

Fresh Market, Stop & Shop, Garelick & Herbs and Planet Pizza generously donated all ingredients.

Each cupcake will have a tag with information on how to make a donation to Westport Human Services, to support local residents in need. It’s not required — but as this family pays it forward, it’s one way for our great new graduates to do the same.


National Geographic explorer and Emmy Award-winning documentary filmmaker Mick Davie‘s presentation at the Westport Library last winter was a smash.

Now he’s back — COVID-style. He’s organized a virtual filmmaking camp for teenagers. The focus is on personal storytelling.

The 5-week program includes 3 two-hour online workshops each week; personal 1-on-1 virtual sessions with Mick, and additional instruction on editing and technical issues with experts in film and TV.

Working in teams of 2 and 3, students will learn all aspects of filmmaking. Their finished product — a short documentary — will be uploaded to the Library’s YouTube channel.

This fall, the Library hosts a Film Festival. At that point — fingers crossed — they’ll all meet in person.

For information on the film-making camp, click hereBONUS NEWS: The library is also planning a camp for 4th-8th graders. Details will be announced soon.


Like many businesses, Fresh Green Light Driving School is reopening.

In addition to continuing to offer online classes all summer, they start limited in-car driving lessons on June 20.  

They’ll work through a 90-day backlog of canceled lessons. New students will begin online, then eventually hit the road.

Connecticut is certainly not Georgia. Earlier in the pandemic, the Peach State allowed teenagers to get a provisional permit without a road test. Yee-haw!


And finally … this is both great wisdom, and one of the greatest live performances of all time:

 

COVID Roundup: Main Street Parking; Summer School, Senior Center Classes Online; More


Town officials report that in Phase 1 of reopening, over 50% of retail establishments are open. In addition, more than 20 restaurants offer outdoor dining. NOTE: Hair salons and barber shops are open by appointment only; walk-ins are not allowed.

Many offices are open too (with a strong emphasis on working from home if possible).

Some businesses and offices have decided it is not yet time to reopen. Call ahead, to determine if a certain establishment or office is operating.

Second Selectwoman Jen Tooker praises non-profit Social Venture Partners, which in a joint venture with the town provided approximately 30 local businesses with non-cost advisory services on topics like financial analysis, marketing and human resources.

In other business news, parking spaces will be cordoned off for at least 30 days on Main Street, from the Post Road to Elm Street, to provide increased pedestrian access.

Parking spaces on Main Street will be cordoned off, to provide more room for pedestrians during social distancing restrictions. (Photos/Chip Stephens)


The Westport Police Department issued this statement, about protests following the death of George Floyd:

“Over the last several days, the town of Westport has been the site of demonstrations in response to recent tragic events in our country. The men and women of this department are sincerely grateful that to date these have been peaceful and constructive gatherings. To the public we serve, we offer a sincere thank you for your continued engagement in your community and your commitment to making our world a better place for us all.  In that goal, we have and will always continue to proudly stand with you.

“Sadly, this has not been the case throughout this country, where violent acts and destruction instead has become on all too common sight in many of our neighborhoods.  The Westport Police Department will always support, and work diligently to protect, the First Amendment rights of our citizens and visitors alike. As we anticipate additional future demonstrations to happen here in and our neighboring communities, we ask that you please do your part to help us ensure the safety and voice of all those in attendance.  There is no greater instrument of peace than a continued dialogue, do not let your message be lost in violence.”


After examining detailed regulations for summer camps and summer school programs, the Westport Public Schools has decided it is untenable to offer in-person programs this year.

“We are very disappointed to be in this position, and understand how disappointed some parents and students might be as well,” says interim superintendent of schools Dr. David Abbey. “However, we are committed to doing our best to offer excellent alternative programming through a distance learning format.”

Continuing Education will provide many programs online, including all  high school courses being offered for credit. Click here for details.


Westport Library director Bill Harmer says:

“The senseless murder of George Floyd once again highlights the racial injustices that continue to plague us in cities and towns across the nation.

“The core mission of the public library is to create a nation of informed and active citizens. Like a compass, we point the way toward a better society that is founded in knowledge and demonstrates respect for diverse peoples and views. By fulfilling this responsibility, we provide a fundamental opportunity for each of us to meaningfully contribute to the success of our democracy.

“While much of our political discourse is seemingly fractious, the public library stands firm as a beacon to inspire citizens to seek common ground in order to help meet the challenges of our time. In this way, libraries function as an essential equalizer in our society.

“In these unprecedented times, we are asking that you join us in fortifying our mission by standing together to shape and determine who we are and what we will become. By supporting and promoting inclusion and equity, we will be playing an active role in creating a better future for all Americans.

“Stay safe, stay healthy, and stay strong.


The Senior Center’s 49 summer classes — including art, exercise and language, along with discussion and support groups — will all be offered via Zoom. For a list of classes, click here; then scroll down.

Westport residents age 60 and older can begin registering this Monday (June 8), starting at 8:30 a.m. You can call 203-341-5099, or mail in a registration form (available here; scroll to the end) with payment to WCSA, 21 Imperial Avenue, Westport.

Out-of-town residents 60 and older can begin registering on Monday, June 15.

Questions? Call 203-341-5099.

(Photo/Molly Alger)


Wildlife has no idea there’s a pandemic. Injured and orphaned animals still need help.

Peter Reid — who is both Westport’s assistant animal control officer and Wildlife in Crisis director —  yesterday rescued 3 orphaned fawns.

Their mother was killed on the Post Road, near Fire Department headquarters.  All 3 are now being cared for by Wildlife in Crisis staff. They will be rehabilitated and released at the appropriate age.

According to Westport Animal Shelter Advocates, it costs $800 to $1,000 to care for each fawn. Click here to help.

Peter Reid and injured fawn.


And finally … Essie Jenkins, with”The 1919 Influenza Blues”:

COVID Roundup: Library’s Phase 1; Westport Masks; Co-Working; More


The good news: The Westport Library is not charging you for all those books, DVDs and other materials you borrowed right before COVID-19, and have been unable to return.

The better news: The library is almost ready to pick them up.

It’s Phase 1 of their multi-step process to reopen. Details — including dates — will be announced soon on the library website, and through their newsletter and social media channels.

Though the building is closed, digital resources — including e-books, audiobooks, streaming music and movies, story times with favorite librarians, author talks and more — are available 24/7.


Joe Biden wears a black mask. Many of us wear whatever we can find. Donald Trump does not wear one at all.

But if all of us — including the president — want to look really cool, we’d wear a Westport mask. You know — one with a map showing the Saugatuck River and Long Island Sound.

They’re 3 layers strong — 2 of cotton, 1 poly — with elastic loops for the ears. The price is $21.99 each, and they’re available through the Savvy + Grace website. The Main Street store is open Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. for no- contact, curbside pickup. They also offer shipping.

Wear your Westport mask with pride! Shop local! And if you — or President Trump — need even more convincing, there’s this: Savvy + Grace’s masks are made right here in the USA.


Of all the businesses to open in Westport a month before COVID-19 struck, you’d think the least lucky would be Serendipity Labs.

It’s a co-working space. These days, the only office chatter is about how to keep people away from one.

But the folks who run the newly renovated, 23,000-square foot flexible workspace — with private offices, customizable team rooms and suites, plus meeting and event space at 55 Post Road West — want residents to know that as you get ready to leave your new office (aka “home”), they understand your concerns. They’ve got you covered.

Serendipity Labs’ “Workplace Transition Program” offers contact-less check-in and “continuous cleaning protocols.” There is “proper ventilation and air flow in all offices and common areas.” And, they claim, their workspace provides “60% more space per person than the competition.”

Private desks start at $299 a month. Drop-in plans begin at $49 a day. For more information, click here or call 203-293-0035.


And finally … like (hopefully) many of us, former Westporter Johnny Winter is “still alive and well.”

Well, at least the song is. He died in 2014.

Rock Paper Scissors Coming Downtown. Everyone Wins!

If you thought the giant “Typewriter Eraser” sculpture on Beachside Avenue was cool, you’ll love this news.

An equally large piece is being donated to Westport.

And it’s planned for a much more visible location than a Greens Farms lawn.

“Rock Paper Scissors” monument is a gift from longtime arts philanthropists Ann Sheffer and her husband Bill Scheffler. The 9-foot high artwork will be placed at the top of Jesup Green, near the new path leading down to the river. It will complement nearby sculptures.

Kevin Box’s “Rock Paper Scissors” monument. This is obviously not its location in Westport.

The Board of Selectmen have already reviewed the gift. It goes before the Planning & Zoning Commission on May 14, and then must be accepted by the RTM.

In its application request, the sponsoring Westport Arts Advisory Committee said that sculptor Kevin Box “pushes boundaries of traditional metal casting by creating sculptures that are so delicate, detailed and weightless that they appear to be made simply of paper.”

Combined with the “fortitude of metal,” that results in “whimsical, fun and beautiful pieces with surprising weight, both literally and figuratively.”

Sheffer — a 1966 graduate of Staples High School, who as a 6-term member of the RTM chaired its Library, Museum and Arts Committee — and her Staples classmate Scheffler have long been involved with the town’s arts scene, as well as the Westport Library.

(For more details on the “Rock Paper Scissors Monument,” click here.)

COVID-19 Roundup: ReOpen Westport Team; Joey’s Reopens; Library Challenge; Virtual Bingo, And More


Yesterday, 1st Selectman Marpe announced the formation of a ReOpen Westport Advisory Team. Members will “seek input from local business and community leaders” so that the community can move forward “in both an overall and segmented way.”

2nd Selectman Jen Tooker chairs the group. More details about the ReOpen team — including, presumably, members — will be announced Monday.

Marpe says, “Westport will continue taking the lead from the state of Connecticut and health experts, but will simultaneously ensure that the status of COVID-19 and the local needs within Westport take precedence to any re-opening decisions.”

Most Post Road businesses remain closed. (Photo/Katherine Bruan)


A wee — but welcome — bit of Westport returns today.

Joey’s by the Shore relocates from the beach to Elvira Mae’s. The new deli/ice cream stand/market — now called “Joey’s by the Shore featuring Elvira Mae’s Coffer Bar” — rolls out a soft opening today.

There’s curbside ordering only (via joeysbytheshore.com). You’ll need to keep your social distance too, of course.

But there’s no better place to do it than there, and no better folks to do it for than Joey Romeo and Betsy Kravitz.

Betsy Kravitz, Joey Romeo and …

… a very happy customer. (Photos/Dan Woog)


Readers: on your marks!

The Westport Library has announced a Summer Reading Challenge. There are 25 “challenge lists.” The goal is to read at least one book from as many challenges as you can.

There’s a form to submit after each one — and a leader board, because hey, there are no baseball standings to follow.

The challenges are challenging. They include a book that spans generations; that makes you laugh (and another that makes you cry); about an election; from the teen collection, and about a battle. Click here for all 25.

The “competition” runs through September 7.


Sure, the weather is beautiful this weekend. But if you’re looking for another reason (besides COVID-19) to stay inside, here’s one: Complete the census.

This weekend, as I’m sure you know, is Census Digital Action Weekend. I’m not sure what that means, but click here for the link.


Stan Witkow provides another update on his weekly Thursday Virtual Bingo game. (That’s the one where anyone can join — and the winner chooses a charity to get the buy-in pot.)

This week they surged past $1,200 overall. The recipient was Mazon: A Jewish Response to Hunger. The “house” made a special $25 donation to the Connecticut Food Bank too.

For more information, email Stan@witkow.com.

A scene from the Virtual Bingo game.


The Staples High School girls soccer team is collecting food for the Gillespie Center.

Needs include canned chicken, low-sugar cereal, canned vegetables (low sodium), canned fruit (low sugar), peanut butter and jelly, dry mil envelopes, pasta sauce, rice, hearty soup, mac and cheese, crackers, salad dressing, and ketchup, mustard and mayo.

Toiletries and cleaning supplies like shampoo, soap, deodorant, tooth care and feminine products, dish soap, laundry detergent, sponges, cleaners and bleach are great too.

The drop-off location is 12 Indian Hill Road. For more information, email aly.sivinski@gmail.com.


And finally … it’s Saturday! So of course tonight that means:

Lillian Wald: The Sequel

Tuesday’s “06880” story on the Westport Library’s suffragist exhibit included some information about Lillian Wald. 

The Round Pond Road resident was revered nationally for addressing social ills like child labor and racial injustice. She worked tirelessly for immigrants’ rights, world peace and women’s full franchise. 

But there is much more to Lillian Wald’s story. Kathie Motes Bennewitz and Bob Weingarten fill in the blanks.

Lillian Wald was born in 1867 in Cincinnati. She graduated from high school at 15, and spent the next 6 years traveling around the globe. After moving to New York City she studied nursing, then entered the Women’s Medical College become a doctor.

In medical school she volunteered her services to the immigrants and poor on the Lower East Side. She became so engrossed in that care that she left medical school. In 1893 she organized the Henry Street Settlement and Visiting Nurse Service of New York. She found her calling.

Henry Street Settlement.

Wald was a dynamic organizer. She started with 10 nurses. By 1916, 250 nurses served 1,300 patients a day.

She worked out of 265 Henry Street, a 5-story walk-up, cold water building on the Lower East Side. Wald helped to educate those she served on health care and personal hygiene, and expanded to assist in housing, employment and education. In 1903 she persuaded President Theodore Roosevelt to create a Federal Children’s Bureau.

Lillian Wald

In later years, Wald was recognized for her efforts in nursing and as an author.

In 1970 she was inducted into the Hall of Fame for Great Americans through the dedicated effort of Aaron Rabinowitz — Ann Sheffer’s grandfather — who knew Wald from childhood, and in the 1930s had moved to Westport to be near her.

She had come to Westport in 1917, as a summer resident. When she retired, she moved full-time to the 1868 house on the pond across from Longshore. She enjoyed watching neighborhood youngsters skate there in winter.

The library exhibit focuses on her suffrage work. In 1914 Wald wrote::

Democracy brings people nearer together…. When women share equally with men the responsibility for righteousness in government and when their counsels on matters of public welfare are given the dignity the ballot bestows, there will follow a new sense of comradeship, a new sense of fellowship between men and women: woman win not be the unacknowledged power behind the throne—she will share the throne!

The suffrage movement in Connecticut.

In the 1910s Wald hosted suffrage events at the Settlement, and delivered addresses. On November 4, 1915, she fed supportive “watchers and pickets” at Lower East Side assembly districts as men voted on New York state’s suffrage amendment.

These polling sites, The New York Times reported, were lively with “constant cheers and cries of ‘Votes for the Women!’ from small boys in the street. Here and there an Italian voice chimed in ‘Vota for Women.’”

When she left New York for Westport, a stream of distinguished guests visited. Eleanor Roosevelt came several times, enjoying tea and staying at the home of Ruth Steinkraus on Compo Road South.

Lillian Wald’s House on the Pond.

In 1937, the First Lady visited for Wald’s 70th birthday. She wrote:

The neighbors in Westport got together and made a book for her, one of the most interesting books it has ever been my pleasure to see. Westport is the home of many artistic people, but this included the names of all her friends, even if their talent was only that of being able to love another fine human being.

They all signed their names, those who could draw, drew pictures, those who could write, wrote verses and prose, and I think that book will be for her a joy in many hours when she perhaps would not have the energy to take up any occupation, or even to look at anything new.

I was interested in the cover of this book, nicely worked in cross-stitch, but designed so that many of her daily interests were right there for you to pick out. Two little Scotties down in the corner; the ducks which waddle down to the pond and eat chunks of bread up near the house; the birds of peace.

Lillian Wald’s birthday book cover. It is owned by Ann Sheffer.

Wald is by far the most famous — but just one of many fascinating Westporters whose stories are told in the Westport Library exhibit. Click here to access the full gallery.

Lillian Wald’s house today.

 

Westport Suffragists: Neighbors, Crusaders

The Westport Library’s new exhibit — “Westport Suffragists — Our Neighbors, Our Crusaders” — opened in early March.

A week later, the library shut down.

Along with so much else, COVID-19 has robbed residents of the chance to visit an inspired, inspiring tribute to an astonishing group of women who worked creatively and energetically for years. Finally a century ago, the passage of the 19th Amendment changed history.

Fortunately this is 2020 — not 1920. Thanks to the internet, anyone anywhere can see the Suffragists exhibit.

And everyone everywhere should.

Designed by the library’s Carole Erger-Fass, in partnership with town arts curator Kathleen Motes Bennewitz, the exhibit is broad and deep.

In text and photographs, it shows the women (in Westport and beyond) who pushed suffrage forward; the places in Westport where significant events took place, and the (long) timeline during which it all happened.

Who knew, for example, that the then-brand-new library at the corner of the Post Road and Main Street was an important meeting place for early suffragists?

The original Westport Public Library

The exhibit notes:

On January 27, 1912, the public library’s handsome oak-paneled hall was transformed into a political theater bedecked with American flags and purple, white and green suffrage banners. The occasion was the Tri-County Crusade for Votes run by the Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association (CWSA). From January through March, the campaign held rallies at every town with trolley service—46 in all—across Fairfield, New Haven and Hartford counties.

Among the artists — the first wave of progressive people to live in Westport — fighting for a woman’s right to vote was Rose O’Neill. Known today as the creator of the Kewpie character, she was also an illustrator dedicated to women’s empowerment. She even used her Kewpies to send a message: “Give Mother the Vote.”

Lillian Wald

Lillian Wald is revered for her work building awareness of, and helping solve, pressing social ills like child labor and racial injustice. She founded the Henry Street Settlement and Visiting Nurse Service of New York, aiding thousands of immigrants. She also worked tirelessly in support of world peace and women’s full franchise.

In 1917 Wald came to Westport as a summer resident. When she retired, she moved full-time to a house on the pond across from Longshore. There she entertained a steady stream of guests, including Eleanor Roosevelt.

Sara Buek Crawford

O’Neill and Wald get their due in the library exhibit. But so does Sara Buek Crawford, a Westporter I’d never heard of. She was a leading suffragist — and, 20 years after the 19th Amendment was approved, she became the first woman in Connecticut ever elected to statewide office.

It’s all there — plus much more — in the Westport Library’s suffrage exhibit. Everyone — of every age, and both genders — should click on, and learn from it.

(Click here for the “Westport Suffragists: Our Neighbors, Our Crusaders” exhibit. Click here for information about more Westport Library exhibits and galleries.)

Library Closed Until Further Notice


Westport Library executive director Bill Harmer says:

The health and well-being of our patrons and staff is the highest priority of the Westport Library. On Thursday, we made the decision to close our doors in response to the COVID-19 outbreak. Other libraries in the state also acted and now nearly all are closed.

Over the past few days, I attended meetings at Town Hall to work with local health officials on developing a plan for how the community could mitigate and contain the virus.  I have talked to friends who work in hospitals and had an ongoing dialogue with the library’s board of directors.

The library hired a cleaning company to do a 2-day deep disinfectant of the building, top to bottom.

(Photo/Lynn Untermeyer Miller)

All evidence points to the fact that things are going to get worse before they get better. The virus is likely to spread exponentially and our infrastructure, especially doctors’ offices and hospitals, are woefully unprepared to handle the onslaught that is coming.

The question for every institution, business, or school is not whether we should do something, but rather what the best course of action is.

For me, containment and mitigation are the answers. The only way to truly reduce the spread of the virus is through social distancing.  We did not believe that social distancing could be achieved by keeping the library open.

Therefore, we have decided that the library will remain closed until further notice.  Our book drops will also be closed, and we are waiving all late fees on Westport owned materials.

The library offers extensive downloadable and streaming digital resources, eAudiobooks, eBooks, eMagazines, music, movies, and many other entertaining and educational resources are available to all cardholders. Click here for links to the digital collection.

During the closure, we will continue to provide email support: for tech assistance visit support@westportlibrary.org; for reference questions ref@westportlibrary.org; for the children’s staff kids@westportlibrary.org, and for account assistance circulation@westportlibrary.org

A scene we won’t see for a while. (Photo/Dan Woog)