Category Archives: Downtown

Groundbreaking Near For Exciting Library Project

It’s not a “renovation.” Nor is it a “remodeling.”

On August 1, the Westport Library breaks ground on a “transformation” project.

Through 21 months of construction — during which it remains open for use — the 31-year-old building will be reimagined, top to bottom.

Literally.

The stark and dark lower level — currently home to the video department, offices, the cramped McManus Room and a few offices — turns into a place of light, nature and activity.

The lower entrance off the Taylor parking lot will be spiffed up and enclosed, resulting in great river views. (Photo/Lynn U. Miller)

The offices facing the river will be recaptured for patrons’ use — with larger windows, to enjoy the view.

Right now, offices, doors and a stairwell prevent patrons from enjoying the nearby river. (Photo/Lynn U. Miller)

The functional Taylor parking lot entrance becomes more welcoming. A 2nd entrance — midway up Jesup Green — offers another access to the main level.

The result of all this is a better visual and visceral connection between the library, the river and the green.

A rendering of the new Jesup Green entrance. It will lead patrons into the upper level about where the graphic novels are located now.

The DVD/BluRay collection — accounting for 35% of the library’s check-outs — moves to the main floor.

So does the very popular McManus meeting room — where it will be 4 times larger.

The main level — the one accessible now only from the Levitt Pavilion lot — undergoes a mind-boggling transformation.

The cafe expands threefold. With more food choices, an outdoor terrace, a new connection to the Sheffer Reading Room and a special entrance allowing it to be used after hours for events like author and poetry readings, this area can become an actual destination.

Right now, the gift/store area is cramped — and so is the cafe behind it. A greatly expanded — and more flexible — cafe is in the works. (Photo/Lynn U. Miller)

The newspaper and magazine reading rooms — with their gorgeous river views — remain. But mobile furniture makes them more flexible.

The hulking service desk gets revamped, to be more open and inviting. Director Bill Harmer calls the area next to it “The Hub,” where staff members offer assistance.

The area near the massive circulation desk becomes much more user-friendly. (Photo/Lynn U. Miller)

The main room gets acoustic tiles, helping noise and aesthetics. Dozens of power outlets will line the perimeter.

But that’s only the start.

A raised floor will be built over the art display kiosks (which are actually air intake vents, too costly to move). The grandstand will be similar to Times Square. Harmer envisions similar excitement, interaction, dreaming and activity.

The Great Hall will include grandstand seating, over the current art exhibit kiosks (which actually hide air intake vents). Stacks will move downstairs.  The area near the windows will be reimagined, providing great views of Jesup Green. (Photo/Lynn U. Miller)

A giant LED screen and excellent sound system add to the possibilities.

A rendering of the grandstand.

The current book stacks move one floor below, freeing up room for what Harmer calls “open, flexible community forum space.” With room for 500 people (and a large screen), it’s a spot for collaborative work, and large programs.

A “forum” replaces stacks on the main floor. It’s a flexible space for collaboration and programs, with a large LED screen at the rear. This rendering shows the view toward the police station.

The entire space can be cleared if needed, for exhibitions or trade-type shows.

The Maker Space has already been disassembled, and reopened temporarily on the top floor. It will reappear — in a larger form — where the reference section, offices and computers are now. It too will have an after-hours entrance.

Harmer describes the new area as “community-oriented hacker space.” Laser cutters, lathes, power tools, sewing machines and kilns will allow for even more than tinkering, robotics, coding and 3D printing.

“We’ll provide the tools of invention,” Harmer says. “We’ll bring the community together to create magic.”

Sounds interesting, but noisy?

No problem: It’s all sound-proofed.

The old Maker Space has been disassembled. The new one will be even better.

The nearby recording studio will be sound-proofed too. “It’s not Abbey Road,” Harmer apologizes. But — designed by Rob Fraboni, an audio engineer who has worked with the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, the Band, the Beach Boys, Eric Clapton and Joe Cocker — it will offer another immersive experience for patrons.

Seven conference/study rooms — more than double the current 3 — will be loaded with technology.

The new McManus Room is planned for the far end of the main floor — closest to the police station — where the stacks are now. Windows will brighten that now-dark corner of the library.

Library director Bill Harmer in the far end of the main floor. Newspapers and stacks will move downstairs, giving way to grandstand seating, an LED screen, the new McManus Room and a recording studio. (Photo/Lynn U. Miller)

Upstairs, the balcony comes out another 5 feet. That provides “box seats” for all that goes on below, while easing the current hallway space crunch.

A much-improved waiting area outside the children’s department is planned. And the nearly unusable balcony will be widened substantially. (Photo/Lynn U. Miller)

The Children’s Department gets an extreme makeover too. More natural light, and a bit of reconfiguring of shelves, enlivens that important area. Giant porthole windows will enable kids to look out over the Great Hall.

Small windows in the children’s section — where shelves now line the wall — will give way to large porthole windows. The Robert Lambdin mural will be moved elsewhere (as will the River of Names tile project, now downstairs). (Photo/Lynn U. Miller)

The price tag for all this is $19.5 million. The town of Westport provides a quarter of the funding. The other three-quarters comes from individual, foundation and corporate donations (including a $1 million state grant).

The library has raised all but $4 million of what’s needed. Bridge financing is already in place.

The Westport Library sits on some of Westport’s most beautiful — and valuable — real estate.

It’s also one of our town’s most used — and valuable — resources.

Less than 2 years from now, the library will be “transformed.”

The project will transform more than the building, and Jesup Green around it.

It will transform all of downtown.

And all of us, too.

Right now, a few areas of the library work well. Views from the children’s department, and the 1st floor Sheffer and magazine reading rooms, will be retained. (Photo/Lynn U. Miller)

(To learn more about the Westport Library transformation project, click here.)

Pic Of The Day #62

Seasonal plantings at Town Hall. (Photo/Larry Untermeyer)

Pic Of The Day #61

Last night’s opening of the Yankee Doodle Fair (Drone photo/Ryan Collins)

What A Dump!

Exactly one week ago, an alert “06880” reader sent me this photo of Parker Harding Plaza:

It shows another side of Westport’s Entitled Driver Syndrome: Someone who for whatever reason can’t be bothered to go to the transfer station, or post on Craigslist. (Note the 2 “Notice” signs nearby, explaining proper dumpage.)

I decided not to run the image. I figured someone would snag the sofa even before the regular trash pickup.

This morning, it was still there.

But now there’s a name attached. “FOR SALE!! Please see Dorece,” it says.

Think that’s bad?

Check out this rear view of the dumpster station — from the side closest to the river:

I’ve posted similar photos before.

And I’ll keep posting them, until someone takes ownership of what is supposed to be our upscale downtown.

Pic Of The Day #58

Flowers in front of Bedford Square (Photo/Mary Sikorski)

Westport Climate Accord Protest Goes National

A few dozen folks stood downtown for half an hour Sunday evening. They held signs and sang “The Times They Are A-Changin’.” The goal was to draw local attention to President Trump’s decision to pull the US out of the Paris Accord.

Now the entire nation can see them.

NPR illustrated this morning’s story about American mayors and businesses’ reactions to Trump with a large photo of the Westport protest.

The caption does not mention Westport specifically. It reads:

Connecticut residents at a rally for the environment against President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate accord. Connecticut is one of twelve states and Puerto Rico that formed the U.S. Climate Alliance, all committing to uphold the Paris Accord.

But clearly our town — and state — have tapped into widespread anger. The story begins:

Days after President Trump announced that he would be pulling the U.S. out of a global agreement to fight climate change, more than 1,200 business leaders, mayors, governors and college presidents have signaled their personal commitment to the goal of reducing emissions.

In an open letter, the signatories vow to “continue to support climate action to meet the Paris Agreement,” even “in the absence of leadership from Washington.”

Click here for the entire NPR piece.

Climate Vigil: “There Is No Plan(et) B”

The rain stopped. The skies cleared.

And several dozen people gathered downtown last night, showing their disgust at President Trump’s decision to withdraw the US from the Paris Climate Accord.

They held candles and signs, and sang songs like Bob Dylan’s “The Times They Are A-Changin’.”

The bipartisan crowd included 1st Selectman Jim Marpe, 2nd Selectman Avi Kaner, State Representative Jonathan Steinberg — and plenty of Fairfield County residents, grateful for the break in the weather after many days of rain.

The vigil began under blue skies …

… with participants holding homemade signs …

… and ended after dark. (Photos/Bruce McFadden)

Climate Vigil Tomorrow: New Time And Site

Sunday’s Candlelight Vigil for Climate Protection has drawn interest far beyond Westport’s beach-stickered citizens.

So organizers have moved the event — planned to protest President Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris Accord — to a spot accessible to everyone: Jesup Green.

The start time is changed too, to 8 p.m. (Sunday, June 4).

Click here for more information, on the group’s Facebook page.

Nicaragua did not join the Paris Accord because it did not go far enough. Syria did not sign because it is consumed by a civil war. The US is withdrawing after signing because … ?

Is That Your Duck?

This was the scene earlier this afternoon, as the first of over 2,000 plastic ducks entered the Great Duck Race chute.

The winning duck won a $5,000 gift card. Nine other winners split another $5,000.

The fun- and fundraising event — complete with face painting, a bouncy ride and more — helps Westport’s Sunrise Rotary Club distribute tens of thousands of dollars to good causes, here and around the world.

If you missed the action, click here for 2nd Selectman Avi Kaner’s livestream on Facebook. Be warned: There was a false start. The action starts at the 17:30 mark.

Pic Of The Day #46

Levitt Pavilion stairs (Photo copyright Lynn U. Miller)