Category Archives: Transportation

Roundup: Catch A Lift, Wynston Browne, Railroad Bridge …

For the past decade, Westport has had a special relationship with Catch A Lift Fund. The national non-profit provides gym memberships and home gym equipment to help wounded post-9/11 service members heal physically and mentally, through physical fitness.

Westporters have donated funds, welcomed veterans, and joined in workouts at venues like the police station, VFW, beach and Birchwood Country Club. The vets give plenty back in return — as inspiration, and  serving as “angels” for children, teens and adults with disabilities through myTeamTriumph.

This year, Westport organizers invite our Fairfield neighbors to join us. Our first-ever Catch a Lift Golf & Tennis Outing is set for September 12, at the Patterson Club.

Click here for the many ways to participate, through golf, tennis, the cocktail party, and as sponsors.

And — because the vets are naturally competitive, in the gym and in life — this golf and tennis event involves a bit of competition too.

Check out the video below, to see the challenges between the Westport and Fairfield police chiefs and 1st selectwomen.

Because this is “06880,” not “06430,” I’m putting my money squarely on Foti and Jen.

 

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Speaking of special people: Wynston Browne’s story inspired many “06880” readers last month. The rising Staples High School sophomore is non-speaking autistic, but he is highly intelligent. He’s made spectacular strides recently using a communication device.

Today (Wednesday, August 10, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.), Wynston will “speak” (via his letter board) with interested residents at The Porch @ Christie’s.

He looks forward to sharing and learning more about everyone who stops by.

Wynston and his communication partner Elisa Feinman, at work with his spelling board.

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Elise Zimmerman asks: “Did you (and your readers know) that the tracks at the Westport train station flip up — like a draw bridge — for big boats?

“I witnessed this engineering feat today, and was very impressed. The train was delayed only a few minutes.”

I can’t speak for any other readers, but I sure knew.

In an amazing coincidence though, just 2 hours earlier Seth Schachter had sent me a collector’s postcard. It shows the same scene, from a different angle.

And from about 100 years earlier:

(Postcard courtesy of Seth Schachter)

Elise adds: “Do any of the other bridges on the Saugatuck River open up? If not, where is the boat going?!”

Have a seat, Elise. Let me tell you about the William F. Cribari Bridge …

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Bass master Brian Torff headlines tomorrow’s Jazz at the Post.

That’s the special Thursday night jazz series at VFW Joseph J. Clinton Post 399. Sets begin at 7 and 8:30 p.m.; dinner from 6:30, from chef Derek Furino.

The cover is just $10. Reservations are strongly recommended; email JazzatThePost@gmail.com.

Plan ahead:

  • August 18, David Morgan Trio
  • August 25: Ben Williams Jazz All-Stars
  • September 1: Rob Henke’s Cook County Stompers.

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Everything you ever wanted to know about telescopes, but didn’t even know to ask.

That’s the subject of the next Westport Astronomical Society’s lecture (August 16, 8 p.m.). Observatory director Bob Meadows is back from the 86tn Convention of Amateur Telescope Makers in Vermont, and will dish on the latest innovations.

Click here for the Zoom link; click here to watch on YouTube.

The Westport Observatory has a very impressive telescope. (Photo/Frank Rosen)

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Amy Simon Fine Art’s next exhibition (August 13 to September 17) is “Never-Ending Stories.” Featured artists are Clara Fialho and Ayse Wilson.

The gallery is at 123 Post Road East.

“Walking Through a Rose Garden Naked” (Clara Fialho)

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Wendy Van Wie sends along a “Westport … Naturally” challenge: Can you find the 3 goldfinches hiding in the sunflowers?

(Photo/Wendy Van Wie)

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And finally … Lamont Dozier died Monday in Arizona. He was 81.

I love many genres of music. But Motown is at the top of my list.

And for many of us who grew up listening to it, the songwriting team of Holland-Dozier-Holland was Motown.

They crafted an astonishing 80-plus Top 40 pop or R&B hits. An amazing 15 went to #1 — including 10 by the Supremes.

Click here for a full obituary. Click here for a list of all their songs. Then click “Comments” below to share your favorites.

It’s tough. My top 5 are here:

Pic Of The Day #1934

Soundview Drive, after dark (Photo/Patricia McMahon)

New Exit Numbers May Drive Us Crazy

Since the 1950s — through name changes (Connecticut Turnpike  to Thruway to I-95), changes in speed limits and the removal of tolls — 2 things remained constant: Exit 17 was in Saugatuck, Exit 18 in Greens Farms.

For even longer — as Merritt Parkway signs changed from wood to metal, and actual arrows were replaced by symbolic ones — Westporters have known  2 truths: Exit 41 was near Wilton, Exit 42 by Weston.

As we’ve seen in many other areas of life, things are not always what they seem. There can be more than one “truth.”

Federal regulations mandate changes, for uniformity and emergency response reasons. With exits marked by miles from a standardized point — in these cases, Mile 0.0 at the New York state border — rather than simple numerical order,* I-95 exit 17 could  become Exit 18. The current Exit 18 would be Exit 20.

Exit 27 will now be Exit 1.

More drastically, Merritt Parkway Exit 41 would be renumbered Exit 21. Exit 42 would turn into Exit 22.

The dramatic — and so far, unreported — information comes from Neil Brickley. The 1971 Staples High School graduate is a civil engineer. His Wethersfield firm, Close, Jensen & Miller, works closely with the state Department of Transportation.

The mileage calculations are Brickley’s. They’re not yet official.

He notes that similar renumbering on limited access highways has already taken place in both eastern Connecticut, and the Middletown area.

The new Exit 18.

However, there’s good news for traditionalists. The Merritt Parkway project will not begin until 2025. I-95 will not be renumbered until 2029.

And once they’re done, signs with both the new and old numbers will remain for at least 2 years.

(Want to knw more? Click here, for a state DOT Frequently Asked Questions page.)

*There is no Merritt Parkway Exit 43 in Fairfield/ Legend has it that Greenfield Hill residents objected to on- and off-ramps in their neighborhood. When plans were scrapped, numbers had a already been assigned. Exit 43 was simply eliminated.

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Small Car Company Provides Big Help

It was called the Small Car Company. But for several years in the late 1960s, the Westport dealership sold more Volkswagens than any other in the US.

The Small Car Company was a Post Road West landmark from the ’60s through the early ’80s. It later became Dragone Classic Motorcars. Today it’s Carvana — the used car dealer selling entirely online — and if that doesn’t say something about yesterday and today, I don’t know what does.

The Small Car Company lives on, though, as SmallCarCompany.org — which also shows how the world has evolved. The brainchild of former Westporters Tom Truitt and Dave Abelow, they’re an informal group of vintage VW and Porsche owners who meet to share their passion, trade information, and host driving rallies and shows.

The club’s shows raise awareness — and funds — for local needs. Their focus is on youngsters in underserved areas who are interested in cars, but lack the resources to be introduced to automobile dealers and classic car owners.

Working with the Piston Foundation — a national organization — they help make connections.

This spring, for example, the Small Car Company brought 30 students from Bridgeport’s Bullard-Havens Technical High School’s auto technology program to the Malcolm Pray Achievement Center in Bedford, New York (including its private 4-story garage filled with classic autos), and then to a meeting with vintage repair mechanics.

Curran Volkswagen in Stratford — a dealership with Westport roots — has promised to hire some of the students from the program.

On October 9, the Small Car Company’s 7th annual Air-Cooled Classic Car Show & Fun(d) Raiser is set for Veterans Green.

Bullard-Havens’ students and teachers will be there.

Seen at Veteran’s Green, last year. (Photo/Sarathi Roy)

The week after, the Small Car Company will be back, as part of the Westport Downtown Association’s Westoberfest. showing off their classic cars and raising even more funds for youngsters who just need a bit of help to begin fulfilling careers.

Plenty of Westporters own Porsches, and other very cool (and air-cooled) cars. We’ve got plenty of vintage car owners and collectors too. For more information on the Small Car Company — and the chance to drive forward a new generation of youngsters looking for guidance, apprenticeships and a foothold in that fascinating world — email tom@smallcarcompany.org.

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Roundup: Trash, Burgers, Nature …

In my ongoing crusade to call out Westport’s entitled slobs where I see them, I’m posting this photo from yesterday evening at the Compo Beach pavilion.

(Photo/Dan Woog)

Note the trash can 3 steps away from the abandoned, garbage-strewn table.

Note also the yellow toy shovel, behind the far carton. So it’s adults who walked away from this mess.

Kids learn by watching. Good luck in a few years trying to get them to clean their rooms.

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After dumping their mess, I headed to Hook’d.

Sure, I’ve been hard on them. But I wanted to give them a chance.

Plus, I was hungry.

I ordered a rare cheeseburger.

“I’m sorry,” the very nice girl at the counter said. “We can’t do that. They’re all the same — medium.”

Wow.

It’s a rare hamburger stand indeed that can’t handle that simple request.

Open, for medium hamburgers only. (Photo/Karen Como)

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It’s classic movie time at the Remarkable Theater next week.

“Dirty Dancing” — postponed from last week — will be screened at the Imperial Avenue drive-in on Monday (July 25, 8:30 p.m.; gate opens at 7:30 for tailgating).

On Wednesday (July 27, 8:15 p.m.; gate opens at 7:15), “Grease” is the word.

Click here for tickets, and more information.

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Compo gets most of the love.

But there’s lots to see and do at Sherwood Island State Park too.

The Nature Center sizzles on Sundays, Thursdays and Fridays. For example:

July 24 (1- to 2 p.m.): Five Irish musicians (the Shamrogues) play. They’re part of the Shamrock Traditional Irish Music Society, which meets Wednesdays at 7at the Gaelic American Center in Fairfield.

July 24, August 14 (2 to 3 p.m.): Birds of Prey ambassador Siobhan, from Earthplace. An owl? Hawk? Vulture? Find out, and learn how to draw ne.

July 28 August 4, August 11 (1 p.m.):Bug Walk. Every Thursday there’s a treasure hunt to find interesting bugs in the gardens. Learn how to report your findings on iNaturalist, and much more.

July 29, July 31, August 5 (1 p.m.): Bird Walk. Learn about the birds around the Nature Center, including the pair of osprey and their 3 chicks, and the dozens of purple martins. 310 species of birds have been observed at Sherwood Island!

August 7 (2 to 3:30 p.m.).  The popular Turtle’s Back program returns, with up to 8 species of turtles found in Connecticut. Touch, draw and learn about them all.

August 21 (2 to 3:30 p.m.): Butterfly Walk. Expert Michele Sorensen leads a walk along the dunes to find buckeyes, swallowtails, sulphurs, fritillaries, monarchs and more. Bring binoculars and cameras.

September 9 (6 to 8:30 p.m.) Friends of Sherwood Island’s Shorefest annual fundraiser and silent auction. Tickets go on sale in early August:

Admission to everything (except the fundraiser) is free, with a Connecticut license plate! Click here for more information.

Nature abounds at Sherwood Island. (Photo/Maureen Salko)

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15 Y’s Men raced — er, drove carefully — to 2 luxury automobile locations yesterday.

They toured Autostrada — the classic car and event space club at the old Steinway piano showroom — and Maserati of Westport, not far away.

They heard about trends in high-end cars. And they learned that about half of the Maserati dealer’s customers come from right here in town. (Hat tip: Dave Matlow)

Autostrada owner Gioel Molinari (far right) welcomes Y’s Men yesterday. (Photo/Dave Matlow)

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Daniel Silva’s new novel, “Portrait of an Unknown Woman,” continues the character of Gabriel Allon, the Israeli spy/artist/restorer.

Surprise! Westport features in the first few chapters, via an art expert in Saugatuck.

That’s all we’ll say, about one of the summer’s hottest beach reads. (Hat tip: Jilda Mankas)

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Jonathan Prager’s lovely lily starts the weekend off on a nice “Westport … Naturally” note.

(Photo/Jonathan Prager)

And finally … to get you in the mood for Wednesday’s Remarkable Theater drive-in feature:

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Flood Warning Is Real; Extended Until 6 PM

The National Weather Service warned of flash flooding.

They were right.

This was the scene moments ago at the Westport railroad station, opposite the former Mystic Market:

It’s a good thing very few folks park at the station these days.

And here was the scene not far away, at Sylvan Road South near Gilbertie’s:

(All photos/Frank Rosen)

The flood warning has been extended until 6 p.m.

Roundup: First Aid, First-Rate Service …

Yesterday’s “Unsung Hero” story brought tears to many readers’ eyes.

It also brought this email, from hero Tucker Peters himself. After saving fellow teenage sailor Mark Adipietro’s life — and reading many heart-warming comments — he wrote one of his own:

“Thank you to everyone for the kind words. I was just one part of an extraordinary team. The true hero though is Mark, who fought like hell. Not many people have the grit or determination to fight back the way he did. He was back on the water with me today — onward and upward we go, forever connected.”

Tucker Peters (left) and Mark Adipietro, on their C420.

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Speaking of first aid and safety:

The fall Emergency Medical Technician/Responder class, sponsored by Westport Volunteer Emergency Medical Services, begins September 6. It runs through December 20. Classes are held Tuesdays and Thursdays, with some Saturday sessions.

Over the years, at least 14 WVEMS members have gone on to medical school. Others became nurses, physician assistants and paramedics.

The cost ($1250 per Emergency Medical Technician student, $750 per Emergency Medical Responder student) includes classes, book, stethoscope and BP cuff. WVEMS can reimburse for the cost of our class after students are cleared as regular WVEMS members.

Click here for more information, and registration details.

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Speaking of service: Tony Giunta died on Saturday. He lived for many years with kidney disease.

A Staples High School graduate who spent 34 years as a Westport Police Department officer and detective, he was equally dedicated to the Boy Scouts, Kiwanis Club, Staples Key Club and Masonic Lodge #65.

In 1996 he carried the Olympic torch down the Post Road, en route to Atlanta.

A full obituary will be posted later. Visitation is a week from tomorrow (Friday, July 22,  4 to 8 p.m., Harding Funeral Home). A funeral mass will be celebrated Saturday, July 23 (10 a.m., St. Luke Church), with a graveside service to follow at Willowbrook Cemetery.

Tony Giunta, in the Masonic Temple meeting room.

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Once upon a time, there were a few dozen service stations in Westport: up and down the Post Road, on Main Street, Riverside Avenue, even Hillspoint Road.

There are very few now. Most sell only gas (and food).

A shout-out to one of the stalwarts: Westport Center Service. The station directly opposite Playhouse Square went above and beyond when I had a tire issue the other day. They were quick, responsive, and very, very efficient.

it’s been owned by the same man — Robert Walsh — since 1965. In a world of ever-changing businesses, and every-diminishing quality, it’s not hard to see why.

Westport Center Service

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Earthplace’s animal rescue and care is ongoing: 365 days a year.

For the next few days, they seek aid from the community.

A few donors have pledged to match up to $20,000 in funds for Earthplace’s animal projects.

Earthplace notes that $50 buys weekly produce for Animal Hall. $150 provides equipment, while $250 feeds all owls for one month. Click here to help.

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Today’s entitled parking photo comes from downtown.

Apparently all the cars facing the opposite direction — and a double yellow line — mean nothing when there’s an open space to be snagged.

(Photo/Maria Freeman)

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Longtime resident Phyllis Tremonte died last month at her Westport home. She was 100 years old.

Phyllis worked for C.B. Dolge Company for over 20 years. She was a member of the VFW Women’s Auxiliary, and was an avid reader. She loved to travel, and enjoyed cooking, baking and taking care of her family.

Phyllis was predeceased by her husband Thomas Tremonte, son Thomas Tremonte Jr., brother John Borriello and sisters, Mary Carrione and Archangel Argenio.

She is survived by her daughter Loretta Tremonte of Westport, daughter-in-law Peggy Tremonte of Wilmont, New Hampshire, grandchildren Thomas P. (Jessica) Tremonte, Julia A. (Mike) Cushman and Michael J. Tremonte, great-granddaughters Laina and Gianna Tremonte, sister Amy Campanella, and many nieces and nephews.

A memorial Mass will be held on Monday, July 18 (10 a.m., Assumption Church). In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory may be made to a charity of one’s choice. Click here to leave online condolences.

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Thanks for all the “full buck moon” photos from last night.  It was quite a sight, as many photographers documented.

Here’s a unique shot. With birds chilling at Compo Beach around 12:30 a.m., it’s a great fit for our “Westport … Naturally” feature.

(Photo/Sunil Hirani)

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And finally … in honor of July 14:

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Muddy Brook Project: A Bridge Too Far?

More than 4 years ago, I published a story by Wendy Crowther.

The preservation-minded Westporter described the history of 19 Craftsman-style stone bridges, built over Willow, Muddy and Deadman brooks, at the dawn of the automobile age.

The Cross Highway bridge. (Photo/Wendy Crowther)

A century later, 9 remained. They’d survived hurricanes, road reconstruction projects, and collisions with decades of distracted drivers.

Wendy noted:

Today we pass over these bridges daily. Yet few of us notice their rustic presence. Their stone walls (“parapets,” in bridge lingo) were designed to convey the sense of a park-like setting — an aesthetic popular at the time.

Most blend seamlessly into the roadside landscape, often appearing to be mere continuations of Westport’s many fieldstone walls. They are simple, folkloric, and historically important.

And she added: “They are at risk.”

Evergreen Avenue (Photo/Wendy Crowther)

She and fellow Westport Preservation Alliance colleague Morley Boyd were particularly concerned about the Kings Highway North Bridge over Willow Brook.

Its enormous stone foundation perhaps dated back to the original “King’s Highway,” built in 1763 to carry mail between New York and Boston.

Large stones in the abutments beneath the Kings Highway North Bridge: Remnants of a much earlier bridge? (Photo: Wendy Crowther)

Wendy and Morley asked the town’s Historic District Commission to list all 9 remaining bridges on the National Register. She said:

We feel that these very special bridges possess the integrity of location, design, setting, materials and workmanship to qualify for this distinguished honor.

On a more visceral level, the preservation of these bridges will allow us to appreciate the human craftsmanship that went into building them.  By picturing the crew of local men who lifted each stone by hand and mortared them in place, we’ll not just notice these bridges — we will feel them.

Nearly half a decade later, they’re still pushing the HDC to act.

That Kings Highway North stone bridge has already been lost.

The one on Greens Farms Road over Muddy Brook may be next. The Flood & Erosion Control Board voted recently to prioritize its replacement.

The Greens Farms Road bridge over Muddy Brook (Photo/Wendy Crowther)

Its historic past was not part of the discussion.

That’s a shame, Wendy and Morley say.

“Of the few remaining circa 1910 stone bridges still remaining in Westport, this is the most beautiful due to its length, its gentle bend, and its setting,” Morley notes.

“Perhaps if the board members had known this, they might have asked different questions, and perhaps some may have changed the way they voted.”

Wendy adds, “Having advocated for their preservation for years, I know that there are ways to deal with or divert flood waters through adjacent culverts without having to replace the bridge in its entirety.

“There are guidelines and engineering publications on how this can be done without ruining the dimensions and historic integrity of the existing bridge.

“These problems can be mitigated without destroying this beautiful bridge. Let’s please insist on seeking alternate solutions to replacement.”

Roundup: “Kim’s Convenience,” David Hidalgo, Trash & Blight …

“06880” has reported several times on the progress of David Hidalgo.

He’s the very talented, always-smiling and very hard-working carpenter/ painter/jack of all trades beloved by many Westporters.

He’s battled 2 separate leukemia diagnoses with a positive attitude. But his situation is now more challenging.

After a bone marrow transplant this spring, David had complications. He was hospitalized with a fever for over 2 weeks. There’s now a blood clot in his leg, and continued nausea. He has lost 60 pounds.  

It has been a trying time for the whole family. His wife Haiying is caring for David and trying to clean houses when she can, while caring for 2 young children.

Money from an initial fundraising campaign is almost all gone. Any support that can be offered to David and his family is greatly appreciated. Click here for a GoFundMe link. Click here to help with gift cards for a meal train.

David Hidalgo with his children Santiago and Annika on Fathers Day.

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A brilliant afternoon beckoned, but a large crowd stayed inside after yesterday’s Westport Country Playhouse matinee performance of “Kim’s Convenience.”

Playwright Ins Choi chatted with WCP associate director David Kennedy about the poignant, family-affirming comedy that moved from Toronto Fringe Festival sensation to Netflix TV smash.

Choi noted the play’s genesis as a way during a time of anti-Asian hate crimes. “The proactive part was continuing to write and share stories with heart, humor, and craft so people listen, laugh, and can’t deny how similar we all are.” he said.

The show runs through Sunday (July 17.) Click here for tickets and more information. (Hat tip: Dave Matlow)

“Kim’s Convenience” playwright Ins Choi, (right) and David Kennedy, in conversation on the Westport Country Playhouse stage. (Photo/Dave Matlow)

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Yesterday’s “06880” Roundup noted the enormous amount of trash generated by this weekend’s multi-state lacrosse tournament at the Staples and Wakeman fields.

But athletes and their parents aren’t the only slobs.

This was the scene yesterday afternoon, at the Compo Beach pavilion:

(Photo/Dan Woog)

I saw it, and tried to imagine what went through the minds of whoever is (ir)responsible for this.

Did they think: “Wow! This is one of the most amazing days of the summer! It’s a perfect Sunday. The sun is shining, it’s not too hot, I’m at a beautiful beach, surrounded by so many people enjoying themselvs.

“So I think I’ll just leave my pile of garbage, instead of walking 3 steps to the trash can, so someone else can pick up after me?”

Or did they just not think at all?

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Carl Swanson spent years volunteering in Houston, helping disadvantaged people find and keep lodging. He understands their plight.

But he’s concerned about a house on Maple Avenue North, near Old Road. The siding is falling off; the garage is full of trash, and the windows are shielded by newspapers. The resident appears to be living in his van in the driveway, Carl says.

Carl notes that the situation has gone on for quite a while. He worries that the home is both an eyesore and a health hazard. He hopes town officials can remedy the situation — and help the owner.

Maple Avenue North house. (Photo/Carl A. Swanson)

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Some exciting news for Westport baseball!

Defending state champion Westport beat Fairfield National yesterday 9-3, to win the district 2 championship.

The sectional tournament begins Thursday.

Congratulations to players Dylan Burdeshaw, Miles Delorier, Henry Ellis, Justin Goldshore, Wyatt Johnson, Christopher Lambert, Chase Landgraf, Jack McGrath, Luke Moneyhon, Torrey Rossetter, Toby Slavin, Grant Theisinger and Nolan Walters, manager Justin Walters and coaches Marc Theisinger and Jon Ellis.

District champs!

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Beechwood — the intimate, innovative and immersive arts salon on Weston Road — is postponing its 11th “Beechwood Open,” scheduled for July 31. The namesake Beechwood House, built in 1806, is undergoing extensive repairs.

It’s now combined with the very fun “Secrets of Beechwood” Scavenger Hunt (September 18, 2 p.m.).

e have hosted The Beechwood Open every year since we started. One of our most popular events, it is outdoors under the Copper Beech and full of unexpected art, music and community and is often the event that introduces new people to Beechwood. Last year’s Beechwood Open was a record-breaker for attendance.

Beechwood House, with a magnificent copper beech tree, was built in 1806.

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Fred Cantor moved to Westport from Queens, when he was in elementary school.

In all the years since, he’d never seen a New York City yellow cab at Compo Beach.

Until yesterday.

(Photo/Fred Cantor)

Fred notes: “That must be one expensive fare. But Compo is worth it, right?”

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The Beardsley Zoo is 100 years old!

The Bridgeport institution’s centennial celebration is set for this fall. It will be big — and it’s got some key Westport connections.

The event is October 29, at the Inn at Longshore. It’s c0-chaired by Westporter Claudette Kunkes. She’s on the board of directors for the Connecticut Zoological Society, which oversees the non-profit zoo.

For more information, including tickets and sponsorships, click here, or email jtaylor@beardsleyzoo.org.

Claudette Kunkes

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Seen at the Kitchen Dwellers’ Levitt Pavilion show last week:

(Photo/Jerry Kuyper)

Yo, dude: We’re tryin’.

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One more note on tonight’s “Caddyshack” showing (Remarkable Drive-In, Imperial Avenue parking lot, 7:30 p.m. gates open, 8:30 film).

Movie-goers are invited to wear their “wildest Caddyshack-inspired” costumes Prizes donated by ASF will be awarded before the film begins.

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Everyone sees something different in today’s “Westport … Naturally” photo, taken of Long Island Sound.

Photographer Roseann Spengler wonders: “Who mows the grass?”

(Photo/Roseann Spengler)

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And finally … in honor of the Beardsley Zoo’s 100th anniversary:

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Photo Challenge #393

There are lots of concrete and brick-lined staircases in Westport — near elementary schools, by the old library, by Patagonia, by for example.

There are even 2 in Playhouse Square. One leads from the parking lot to Salsa Fresca.

That was close to the correct answer to last week’s Photo Challenge.

The actual one was the much less used (and visible) stairway: the one to the left of Granola Bar, leading to the gym and offices underneath the shopping center (and the back of Quality Towing).

Eric Bosch, Diane Bosch, Morgan Smith and Patricia Blaufuss were the 4 readers who knew exactly where last week’s Photo Challenge was located. Click here to see.

This week’s Challenge should be familiar. If you know where in Westport you’d see this, click “Comments” below.

(Photo/Maggie Rahe)