Tag Archives: Lynsey Addario

Roundup: Lynsey Addario, Bistro Du Soleil, More


Congratulations, Lynsey Addario!

The 1991 Staples High School graduate (and MacArthur “genius grant” award winner) has been named to the International Photography Hall of Fame. She’ll be inducted October 30.

The photojournalist has covered conflict and humanitarian crises around the Middle East and Africa for the New York Times, National Geographic and Time magazine for nearly 2 decades. Her work is powerful, thought-provoking, and very, very human.

The aftermath of a miscarriage in a Somali hospital. (Photo/Lynsey Addario, courtesy of NPR)

Lynsey joins such legendary figures as Ansel Adams, Richard Avedon and Mathew Brady. Click here to read more about the “pioneers of photography.” Click here for Lynsey’s website.

Lynsey Addario


Yesterday, “06880” highlighted outdoor dining in Westport. Jana Malakoff writes about her favorite restaurant — which has not added al fresco tables:

“Bistro du Soleil is open for take out only from Wednesday through Saturday.  They offer a wonderful 4 course dinner for only $32. Bistro is off the beaten track, south of Saugautuck center and north of the restaurants near the railroad station.

“I am a senior citizen and have not felt comfortable dining in or out, nor do I want a fine dining experience marred by faceless servers. I have enjoyed my weekly dinners from Bistro du Soleil since they opened for takeout earlier this year.

“I hope ‘06880’ readers know that Bistro Du Soleil is in business, and certainly worth ordering dinner from.”

Bistro du Soleil


Interested in statehouse candidates’ environmental stands?

Earthplace and Sustainable Westport are sponsoring virtual debates for local Senate and House of Representatives candidates.

This Tursday’s event (October 22, 6 p.m.) features State Senate hopeful Kim Healy and incumbent Will Haskell. Click here to register.

The next day (Friday, October 23, 6 p.m.) House of Representatives incumbent Jonathan Steinberg debates Chip Stephens. Click here to register.


POP’T Art’s new show, “96% STARDUST,” features Brendan Murphy. With a focus on “transmitting positive energy” through his work, he’s making his area debut — at a time when joy, inspiration and hope are needed more than ever.

The show opens to the public next Saturday (October 24), at the 1 Main Street gallery. Email haviland@havilandreed.com for timed reservations, and for private preview showings beginning October 21.

Brendan Murphy’s work.


And finally … in honor of the new “Stardust” art show at POP’T Art:

Roundup: David Pogue; Lynsey Addario; Ospreys; Lending Library; More


David Pogue is like Forrest Gump’s box of chocolates. You never know what you’re gonna get. Unlike most chocolate boxes though, with the Westport tech guru/writer/TV star/jack of all trades, there’s never anything you don’t like.

Yesterday, as part of his regular “CBS Sunday Morning” gig, Pogue poked behind the production of the world’s largest virtual choir.

How do 17,000-plus voices come together in perfect harmony? Click below.

Oh, yeah: Pogue himself was one of the performers. Were there any other Westport connections? If so, click “Comments” below.


Yesterday’s New York Times story on the Rio Grande Valley — where poverty and chronic illness compound the coronavirus — was sad and compelling.

It was made more powerful by the images that accompanied it. They were shot by Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist (and 1991 Staples High School graduate) Lynsey Addario. As always, her images show far more than what is in the frame. Click here for the full Times story. (Hat tip: Kathie Motes Bennewitz)

Nurses surround a coronavirus patient moments after her death. (Photo/Lynsey Addario for the New York Times)


The Fresh Market ospreys continue to fascinate Westporters. Intrepid raptor-watcher Carolyn Doan reports that the 2 fledglings have fledged. Here’s one:

(Photo/Carolyn Doan)


The Westport Library has reopened, with limited service. There’s an alternative, at 95 Kings Highway South.

Sure, the selection is limited. But you don’t have to worry about masks or crowds.


And finally … on this date in 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans to walk walk on the moon. Ten others have followed. The last 2 — Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt — made the journey in 1972.

“Love Nonnie”

On her 102nd birthday, Louise Bonito captivated the world.

In a video that racked up hundreds of millions of views, she blew out the candles on her cake. Her dentures flew out — and she laughed uproariously.

Westport claims “Nonnie” as her own. Her daughter is our longtime neighbor Camille Addario. Her granddaughters — Lynsey, Lisa, Leslie and Lauren Addario — graduated from Staples High. All are notable, accomplished, independent, fierce, great women.

In April, the “girls” organized a drive-by parade in North Haven for Louise’s 107th (!) birthday. The woman who lived through the Spanish flu wasn’t about to let the current pandemic slow her down.

Louise Bonito (Photo/Lynsey Addario)

But that was just the start. Now — thanks to a video created by Lisa Addario — “Nonnie” has once again captured the planet’s attention.

In just 18 minutes — that’s less than 2 minutes for every decade she’s lived — this remarkable woman offers one of the most inspiring videos you’ve seen since, well, mid-March.

“Don’t hold grudges,” she says. “Always look on the bright side of life.” She’s gotten angry, of course — but then she asks herself, “What did I get mad for?”

She had plenty of reasons. Nonnie’s husband forced her to have 3 back-alley abortions — and left her when she was pregnant with their 5th child. She supported her family as a seamstress.

Now she’s blessed with her own children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. They have a big Italian dinner every Sunday. It’s a lively, loving scene (just watch Nonnie dig into the meatballs).

“They always thank me,” she says. “That’s worth more than a million dollars.”

Louise “Nonnie” Bonito, surrounded by her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

At 107 years young, she still does much of the cooking. She also shops, makes her own bed, and goes to the casino. “What’s wrong with that?” she asks. Recently, Nonnie won $250.

“I don’t like to sit around,” she says, in one of the video’s true understatements.

She says other things too, that you seldom hear from a 107-year-old woman. (Granted, you don’t often hear from a 107-year-old, period.)

When her granddaughter asks if she had sex before marriage, she says, “No! We didn’t do that!”

But then she adds, “To each his own.”

Nonnie says she “welcomes everyone.” It’s clear why: Her mother took what little food the family had, and gave it to others.

It’s quite a video. In just a few days, it’s already been viewed more than 200,000 times.

Or 2,000 times, for each of this wonderful woman’s 107 remarkable years.

(Hat tip: Hedi Lieberman)

 

Happy 107th Birthday, Louise Bonito!

It’s not every day that someone turns 107 years old.

This Sunday (April 26), Louise Bonito does it — in the middle of her 2nd pandemic. She was already in school when Spanish flu swept the world, more than a century ago.

So how to celebrate the milestone?

Louise’s daughter — longtime Westporter Camille Addario — and granddaughters Lynsey, Lisa, Leslie and Lauren have cooked up a special treat.

At 3 p.m. Sunday, they’ve invited everyone to drive by Louise’s house in North Haven (630 Middletown Avenue), to honk and wave.

Louise Bonito (Photo/Lynsey Addario)

“We d love anyone who feels adventurous and needs an uplifting celebration — or just a brief change of scene — to come,” Lynsey says.

Finding a card that says “Happy 107th!” is optional.

The Year In Pictures: Tyler Hicks/Lynsey Addario Edition

Every year, the New York Times produces an end-of-the-year retrospective: “The Year in Pictures.”

The 2019 project was the most ambitious yet. Last Sunday’s photos were part of a stand-alone special section. It included interviews with the photographers, taking readers behind the scenes (and the lens).

Editors culled through over 500,000 photos. Just 116 made the cut.

Three are from Staples High School graduates. And one — by Tyler Hicks — is the first image shown, for the very first month.

(Photo/Tyler Hicks for the New York Times)

The 1988 Staples alum photographed Saleh Raken, a boy of about 10 years old, who was playing near his home in Yemen when a land mine blew off his lower leg.

Hicks explained:

On this assignment, I saw more of the humanitarian impact of the war than I had on any of my previous trips there, particularly in northern Yemen, where I took this photograph of a young boy who had lost part of a leg from a land mine explosion. There were also many other children and adults alike who had lost limbs or who continue to lose limbs every day in Yemen.

In this case, it’s very difficult when you walk into a clinic and a hospital and there are so many people suffering. You ask yourself: Whom should I photograph? You want to document every case, but that would be impossible.

This boy in particular had a very innocent face and reminded me a lot of any kids that I would see in my own community. And yet he was changed for life by something that he’s absolutely not involved in, and so I chose to focus on him and allow this boy to represent, in this case, all of the other children in the clinic.

Oftentimes, it is more effective for a photograph to be specific than it is to try to include a large group. It allows viewers to identify with somebody and interpret that subject and that photograph in their own ways.

Two other photos were taken by 1991 Staples grad Lynsey Addario. A shot from February showed Marine recruits at the beginning of a grueling 54-hour training exercise.

(Photo/Lynsey Addario for the New York Times)

Her second image was of Marieke Vervoort, a Belgian Paralympic athlete with a degenerative spinal disease that caused excruciating pain. This fall, she chose do end her life via euthanasia. Addario’s photos about Vervoort’s life and death appeared in a special Times report earlier this month.

(Photo/Lynsey Addario for the New York Times)

To see all 116 photos, click here.

Lynsey Addario Chronicles A Champion’s Death

Lynsey Addario is remarkable.

The Staples High School graduate is a Pulitzer Prize winner — and a MacArthur “genius grant” Fellowship awardee.

She’s spent her career photographing life in Afghanistan, the plight of Syrian refugees, conflicts in Iraq, Libya, Lebanon, Darfur and Congo, and humanitarian and human rights issues around the world for the New York Times, National Geographic and Time magazine. She’s a book author too.

“06880” can’t cover all of Lynsey’s projects — there are just too many. But her latest effort deserves a special shout-out.

For 3 years, she and New York Times reporter Andrew Keh followed Marieke Vervoort as the Belgian Paralympic gold-medal athlete wrestled with the decision to die by euthanasia.

Marieke Vervoort at home in Belgium. She did not believe in God, but kept a Buddha statue in her back yard. (Photo copyright Lynsey Addario for New York Times)

Lynsey visited her often at home and in hospital stays in Belgium, and traveled with her on trips to the Canary Islands and Japan.

The result is an astonishing story about the human spirit. It ranges from sports, family, friends to the many ways in which people live and die.

The writing is strong and insightful. Lynsey’s photos add one more dimension. Days after Marieke died, they beautifully honor her life.

In her final hours, Marieke Vervoort embraces her parents. (Photo copyright Lynsey Addario for New York Times)

(Click here for the full New York Times story. Tomorrow [Monday, December 9, 8 p.m.] Lynsey Addario appears at Fairfield University’s Quick Center. She will speak on “Eyewitness Through My Camera Lens: World in Conflict,” as part of the Open Visions forum that celebrates outstanding female leaders. Click here for tickets, and more information. Hat tip: Dick Lowenstein.)

Lynsey Addario And Maternal Mortality: The NPR Interview

NPR is an auditory medium. But its website complements its radio features. A few days ago, that site featured some stunning photos.

They were taken by Lynsey Addario. The Staples High School graduate has spent the past decade — in addition to covering life in Afghanistan and the plight of Syrian refugees, for publications like the New York Times, National Geographic and Time magazine — documenting the brutal reality of maternal mortality.

Every 2 minutes around the world, a woman dies in childbirth or from pregnancy-related causes. Since 2009, Addario has photographed overcrowded hospitals, bloody delivery room floors and midwives in training.

An overcrowded maternity ward in India. (Photo/Lynsey Addario, courtesy of NPR)

She’s done it thanks to a MacArthur Fellowship. Known popularly as a “Genius Grant,” the no-strings $625,000 award can be used however the recipient sees fit.

Addario has pursued a subject that is not “sexy.” It’s one many editors, readers — even male photojournalism colleagues — don’t understand.

In the NPR interview, Addario talks about a formative experience: watching a woman in Sierra Leone hemorrhage and die.

She describes the intimacy of her photos; her own experience becoming a mother while documenting maternal mortality, and the reality that childbirth is not a Hallmark card.

It’s a fascinating story. Thanks to NPR, it is seen — as well as heard.

(Click here for the full interview. Hat tip: Dick Lowenstein)

The aftermath of a stillbirth in a Somali hospital. The woman survived, thanks to skilled midwives. (Photo/Lynsey Addario, courtesy of NPR)

Andrea Dutton: Westport’s Newest Genius

Andrea Dutton is a genius.

That’s not just hyperbole. The 1991 Staples High School graduate — visiting associate professor of geology at the University of Wisconsin, who investigates changes in sea levels and ice sheet mass — is one of 26 people chosen as 2019 fellows of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

That’s the official wording. The world calls them “genius grants.”

MacArthur fellowships honor “extraordinary originality.” The award is pure genius: a no-strings grant of $625,000, distributed over 5 years.

The fellowships — announced yesterday — went to men and women whose work “pushes the boundaries of disciplines and genres,” says the New York Times.

They include a theater artist who incorporates artificial intelligence into performances; novelists, musicians, scientists, historians, legal advocates, community activists and others. All were chosen “at a moment in their careers when the award might make a difference,” and range in age from 30 to 67.

Andrea Dutton with a fossilized coral reef in the Florida Keys. (Photo/Joshua Bright for Redux)

Potential geniuses are suggested by hundreds of anonymous nominators, in many fields. The final selection is made by a committee — also anonymous.

Dutton calls herself a “detective collecting clues to solve the puzzle of earth’s climate history.

The paleoclimatologist’s work has immense real-life implications. Her reconstruction of sea levels over thousands of years can help predict future rises. In 2017, Rolling Stone magazine listed her among “25 People Shaping the Future in Tech, Science, Medicine, Activism and More.”

Dutton is not Westport’s first MacArthur genius. Photojournalist Lynsey Addario — a fellow 1991 Staples grad — received a fellowship in 2009.

(Click here for the stories of all 26 new MacArthur fellowship awardees. Hat tips: Sandee and Chuck Cole.)

 

Lynsey Addario: Power Player Of The Week — Again

Last December, Lynsey Addario  was named Fox News’ “Power Player of the Week.”

This week, she did it again.

It may have been a slow news week. Or maybe Chris Wallace really likes the Staples High School graduate, who has gone on to earn both a Pulitzer Prize and a MacArthur genius grant.

The “Fox News Sunday” host says that Lynsey Addario takes “riveting photographs that bring the savagery of the front lines into your home.”

Addario claims she is “not brave — just committed.”

Wallace listed the places Addario has worked: Afghanistan. Iraq. Libya. Darfur. South Sudan. Somalia.

She goes there, she says, because it is “fundamental to document” what occurs in those war-torn places.

After photographing skeletons and devastated villages, Addario goes home. There, she tries to explain war — and her work — to her 6-year-old son.

For the full feature, click here.

(Hat tip: Neil Brickley)

Lynsey Addario: Fox News “Power Player Of The Week”

Chris Wallace says that Lynsey Addario takes “riveting photographs that bring the savagery of the front lines into your home.”

The Pulitzer Prize and McArthur grant winner claims she is “not brave — just committed.”

Those quotes — and stunning examples of her work — were shown yesterday. The Westport native and Staples High School graduate was named Fox News’ Power Player of the Week.

Wallace listed the places Addario has worked: Afghanistan. Iraq. Libya. Darfur. South Sudan. Somalia.

She goes there, she says, because it is “fundamental to document” what occurs in those war-torn places.

After photographing skeletons and devastated villages, Addario goes home. There, she tries to explain war — and her work — to her 6-year-old son.

For the full feature, click here.

(Hat tip: Neil Brickley)