Tag Archives: Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario: Power Player Of The Week — Again

Last December, Lynsey Addario  was named Fox News’ “Power Player of the Week.”

This week, she did it again.

It may have been a slow news week. Or maybe Chris Wallace really likes the Staples High School graduate, who has gone on to earn both a Pulitzer Prize and a MacArthur genius grant.

The “Fox News Sunday” host says that Lynsey Addario takes “riveting photographs that bring the savagery of the front lines into your home.”

Addario claims she is “not brave — just committed.”

Wallace listed the places Addario has worked: Afghanistan. Iraq. Libya. Darfur. South Sudan. Somalia.

She goes there, she says, because it is “fundamental to document” what occurs in those war-torn places.

After photographing skeletons and devastated villages, Addario goes home. There, she tries to explain war — and her work — to her 6-year-old son.

For the full feature, click here.

(Hat tip: Neil Brickley)

Lynsey Addario: Fox News “Power Player Of The Week”

Chris Wallace says that Lynsey Addario takes “riveting photographs that bring the savagery of the front lines into your home.”

The Pulitzer Prize and McArthur grant winner claims she is “not brave — just committed.”

Those quotes — and stunning examples of her work — were shown yesterday. The Westport native and Staples High School graduate was named Fox News’ Power Player of the Week.

Wallace listed the places Addario has worked: Afghanistan. Iraq. Libya. Darfur. South Sudan. Somalia.

She goes there, she says, because it is “fundamental to document” what occurs in those war-torn places.

After photographing skeletons and devastated villages, Addario goes home. There, she tries to explain war — and her work — to her 6-year-old son.

For the full feature, click here.

(Hat tip: Neil Brickley)

Lisa Addario’s “Amateur Night”

Lynsey Addario gets plenty of shout-outs on “06880.”

But the Pulitzer Prize and MacArthur grant-winning New York Times photographer is not the only talented member of the 4-female-sibling family.*

Lisa — a 1986 Staples High School graduate — has just written and directed “Amateur Night” (with her husband, Joe Syracuse).

Based on their early experiences in Hollywood, the film stars Jason Biggs, Janet Montgomery and Ashley Tisdale. It’s also the feature debut for Eddie Murphy’s daughter, Bria Murphy.

“Amateur Night” opens today (Friday, August 5) in New York and Los Angeles. It’s then in select cities — and video on demand — beginning August 12.

Here’s the trailer. Warning: It’s rated R!

*And of course we love their parents, Philip and Camille.


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Tyler Hicks Wins Another Pulitzer Prize

Most journalists dream of winning a Pulitzer Prize.

Tyler Hicks needs a new dream.

The Westport native and Staples High School graduate earned his 3rd Pulitzer in 7 years today. He shared the award for Breaking News in Photography with 2 fellow New York Times photojournalists. The trio were honored for their images that “captured the resolve of refugees, the perils of their journeys and the struggle of host countries to take them in.”

This photo by Tyler Hicks appears on the Pulitzer Prize website. The caption reads: "After battling rough seas and high winds from Turkey, migrants arrive by rubber raft on a jagged shoreline of the Greek island of Lesbos. Fearing capsize or puncture, some panicked and jumped into the cold water in desperation to reach land. This young boy made it, unlike hundreds of others." (Photo/Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - October 1, 2015). 

This photo by Tyler Hicks appears on the Pulitzer Prize website. The caption reads: “After battling rough seas and high winds from Turkey, migrants arrive by rubber raft on a jagged shoreline of the Greek island of Lesbos. Fearing capsize or puncture, some panicked and jumped into the cold water in desperation to reach land. This young boy made it, unlike hundreds of others.” (Photo/Tyler Hicks, The New York Times – October 1, 2015). Click image to enlarge.

Hicks’ previous Pulitzers came in 2009 (as a member of a team, for International Reporting coverage of Afghanistan and Pakistan), and 2014 (for Breaking News Photography, for his stunning shots of the deadly attack by terrorists on a Nairobi shopping center.)

Hicks began working for the Times in 1999, photographing stories throughout Africa. After 9/11, he traveled to Kabul, documenting the city’s liberation from the Taliban. He has returned to Afghanistan often.

Hicks has done award-winning work around the globe, from Haiti to Albania and Kosovo.

Tyler Hicks

Tyler Hicks

On March 16, 2011 Hicks and 3 other reporters — including fellow Times photojournalist and Westporter Lynsey Addario were abducted in Libya. After 6 harrowing days in captivity, they were released. (Click here for more details.)

On Feb. 16, 2012 in Syria, Hicks was with Times Beirut bureau chief Anthony Shadid, when Shadid died of an asthma attack. Hicks helped carry the journalist’s body across the border to Turkey.

When he gets a chance, Hicks visits Westport, where his mother and sister still live. He now calls Kenya home.

But — as his important, eye-opening Pulitzer Prize-winning photos attest — the world’s hot spots are truly his home.

PS: Congrats too to Matt Davies. The 1985 Staples grad was one of 2 finalists for the Pulitzer Prize in Editorial Cartooning. Davies — who now draws for Newsday — won the Pulitzer in 2004, and was also a finalist in 2011.

(For full details of the Pulitzer Prize in Breaking Photography, click here.)

Lynsey Addario’s Latest Story

Today, Nile Rodgers was the focus of a New York Times feature.

Tomorrow, Lynsey Addario focuses on a Times Magazine cover story.

The issue examines the plight of displaced people around the globe. Lynsey —  a Pulitzer Prize and MacArthur genius grant winner, and a Staples High School graduate — contributes stunning photos from Syria, South Sudan and Ukraine.

Lynsey has a knack for finding heartbreak — and, amid it sometimes, hope — around the globe. This story is some of her most harrowing, and important, work.

(Photo/Lynsey Addario for the New York Times)

(Photo/Lynsey Addario for the New York Times)

Click here for the stories, and Lynsey’s remarkable images.

(Hat tip: John Karrel)

 

Lynsey’s Love Fest

Maxine Bleiweis has mastermined 17 “Booked for the Evenings.”

But tonight was her first honoring a homegrown hero.

Lynsey Addario — Pulitzer Prize winner, MacArthur genius grant awardee, inspiration for an upcoming Steven Spielberg movie and now best-selling author — drew a packed house to the Westport Library.

Friends from childhood, friends of her parents, family members (including her 102-year-old grandmother), and just proud Westporters, they were already impressed by the New York Times photojournalist. When they saw her compelling images, heard her harrowing stories of her work in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Darfur and Libya, they left even more awed.

Lynsey Addario speaking tonight at the Westport Library's

Lynsey Addario speaking tonight at the Westport Library’s “Booked for the Evening.” One of her vivid photographs is projected behind her.

It was a hometown evening. Actress Cynthia Gibb (Staples High School Class of ’81) read excerpts from Lynsey’s book, It’s What I Do: A Photographer’s Life of Love and War. Doug Tirola (Staples ’84) produced a tribute video (narrated by CNN anchor and Easton native Ivan Watson). Eli Koskoff (Staples ’15, and Lynsey’s colleague Tyler Hicks’ nephew) played guitar.

Lynsey was called “brilliant, articulate, warm, engaging and very kind” — and she did not disappoint. She gave shout-outs to her sisters, parents, and the town she grew up in. All helped provide the one quality that, she said, every photojournalist needs: “being non-judgmental.”

It was a wonderful evening: for Lynsey, for Westport, and for the library that — in 17 years of “Booked” events — has raised over $3 million.

As New York Times Magazine director of photography Kathy Ryan said: “This is the rocking-est library I’ve ever seen!”

Lynsey Addario’s “Booked For The Evening”: The Back Story

The Westport Library’s “Booked for the Evening” fundraiser is always special. Previous honorees have included Tom Brokaw, E.L. Doctorow, Calvin Trillin, Wendy Wasserstein, Pete Hamill, Martin Scorsese, Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Halberstam, Oscar Hijuelos, Adam Gopnik, Will Shortz and Patti Smith.

This year, though, is especially special. On Saturday, May 9 (7:30 p.m.), the library welcomes Lynsey Addario. She’s a Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist, MacArthur “Genius Grant” winner, internationally known role model — and a Westporter.

Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario

Lynsey’s accomplishments are — well, special. Working for the New York TimesNational Geographic and Time, she has documented life and oppression under Taliban rule in Afghanistan; conflicts in Iraq, Libya, Lebanon, Darfur and Congo, and humanitarian and human rights issues across the Middle East, South Asia and Africa.

Now, Lynsey is a noted author. It’s What I Do: A Photographer’s Life of Love and War is an insighful, inspiring memoir. It’s also been optioned as a big-time film. Steven Spielberg will direct it, with Jennifer Lawrence playing Lynsey.

None of which may have been possible without our special Westport Library.

The other day, I asked Lynsey if she recalled her early library days.

Boy, did she.

Her parents came to Westport in the 1960s to open a salon, Phillips. They had finished hairdressing school in New Haven, and were attracted to Westport’s thriving, creative atmosphere. Artists and authors seemed to be everywhere.

As a Coleytown Elementary School student, Lynsey remembers making field trips to the “old” library. In that building, on the Post Road and Parker Harding Plaza — where Starbucks and Freshii are now — she learned how to use the card catalog, and search for books.

The "old" library, where a young Lynsey Addario learned a lot.

The “old” library, where a young Lynsey Addario learned a lot.

The “new” library — the one next to the Levitt Pavilion — opened when Lynsey was at Staples. She was discovering photography, and used the library to learn more about the field.

Today, most of Lynsey’s research is done via the internet. But she knows how important libraries are.

At the University of Wisconsin, she spent “countless” nights researching papers and utilizing resources.

“I have always seen libraries as sanctuaries,” Lynsey says. “Now, I work primarily in war zones. Basic resources like food, water, electricity and shelter are a priority. Libraries would be the greatest luxury in these places. They are a sad casualty of the realities of war.”

Lynsey Addario photographed this young girl, who died delivering twins. The Sierra Leonean wanted to earn a degree, but at 14 was forced into marriage. (Photo/Lynsey Addario for NPR)

Lynsey Addario photographed this young girl, who died delivering twins. The Sierra Leonean wanted to earn a degree, but at 14 was forced into marriage. (Photo/Lynsey Addario for NPR)

The Westport Library is many things, to many people. We all use it in different, and varied, ways. But all of us find — and learn — something there.

On May 9, we can learn a little bit from Lynsey Addario — who learned more than a little bit in our own across-the-street library, a very brief lifetime ago.

(For more information on “Booked for the Evening” — including tickets — click here.)

It’s Official: Lynsey Addario Is A Star

Last night she reached the top of the food chain: an appearance on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.”

The segment was not hilarious. It was harrowing — as the Staples graduate/Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist/MacArthur “genius” grant winner recounted her 2 kidnappings — but also very instructive.

Lynsey Addario Jon Stewart

Stewart called Lynsey’s new book — It’s What I Do — “fascinating and phenomenal.” He ended the segment with a shot of her after her wedding, and announced, “You have a life. And you are a person.”

She is indeed. Westport has long known that.

Now the world does too.

(To see Lynsey Addario’s “Daily Show” appearance, click here.)

Lynsey Addario’s “Fresh Air”

Two wonderful women — Lynsey Addario and Terry Gross — met this afternoon.

The host of NPR’s “Fresh Air” interviewed the author of It’s What I Do: A Photographer’s Life of Love and War. The result was both insightful and important.

To listen, click here.

Addario — a Staples High School graduate, Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist and MacArthur fellow — also earned a very positive book review in last Sunday’s New York Times. Click here to read it.

Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario

 

Lynsey Addario: A Pregnant Photographer Covers War, Famine, Other Horrors

Lynsey Addario — New York Times photojournalist, Pulitzer Prize winner, MacArthur fellowship recipient, Westport native and Staples grad — has written a fascinating book. “It’s What I Do: A Photographer’s Life of Love and War” provides great insight into what it’s like to cover war, famine and horror — and how being a woman has impacted every aspect of her professional and personal life.

This coming Sunday’s Times Magazine includes a long, compelling excerpt from the book. It begins with the harrowing account of being captured — along with fellow Staples grad and Times photographer Tyler Hicks — in 2011, by forces loyal to Muammar el-Qaddafi:

You have two options when you approach a hostile checkpoint in a war zone, and each is a gamble. The first is to stop and identify yourself as a journalist and hope that you are respected as a neutral observer. The second is to blow past the checkpoint and hope the soldiers guarding it don’t open fire on you.

The group’s young driver tried to avoid capture by yelling “Media!” It did not work.

Three weeks before her capture, Lynsey Addario photographed children amid the ruins of Benghazi. (Photo/Lynsey Addario for the New York Times)

Two weeks before her capture, Lynsey Addario photographed children amid the ruins of Benghazi. (Photo/Lynsey Addario for the New York Times)

After providing harrowing details about their captivity, Lynsey describes the agonizing pull she felt between doing what she felt was her life’s mission, and her responsibility to her loved ones:

I had imposed unspeakable worry on my husband, Paul de Bendern, on more occasions than I could count. And Anthony [Shadid] and Steve [Farrell] each had infants at home. Yet as guilty as we felt, and as terrified as we were, only Steve sounded convinced by his own declaration that he would no longer cover war. Each one of us knew that this work was an intrinsic part of who we were: It was what we believed in; it governed our lives.

“We need to get to Tripoli,” Anthony said. “We will never get released if we don’t get to Tripoli. We will probably survive, it will be difficult, but we might live if we get there.”

“If we do, I am going to be so fat in nine months!” I cried out suddenly.

After more than a decade of feeling ambivalent about having a child, I knew that if we made it out of Libya alive, I would finally give Paul what he had been wanting since we married: a baby.

Later, she digs deeper into the lives of war correspondents:

Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario

There was a lot of cheating in war zones, a lot of love and a lot of mistaking loneliness for love. But the reality was different for men and women. Most male war correspondents had wives or girlfriends waiting at home while they fooled around on assignment. Most female war correspondents and photographers remained single, searching fruitlessly for someone who would accept our devotion to our work.

My romantic life was colorful but difficult: I had an affair with a Cuban diplomat in New York, fell in love with an artist in Mexico City and had a relationship with an Iranian actor in Tehran, whom I could rarely get a visa to visit. But I gave only a finite part of myself to each of these men; work remained my priority, keeping me on the road 280 days a year. I began to assume that my relationships would end in affairs and heartbreak.

After meeting her husband, marrying, getting captured and then pregnant, Lynsey continued to work:

At four and a half months, Doctors Without Borders sent me to photograph its medical outreach for victims of the drought in the Horn of Africa, from the Turkana region to the Somali refugee camps at Dadaab in Kenya. Part way through the assignment, working in remote African villages, I could no longer button my pants. I was 20 weeks pregnant. The nausea and exhaustion were gone, my energy had returned and I was eating regularly, though careful to avoid harmful bacteria, which meant a diet of bread, rice, bananas and protein bars that I carried from home.

She continued on to Mogadishu, where the situation was far worse than even Kenya. She knew that if anything happened to her — 5 months pregnant — her editors and peers would write her off as “crazy and irresponsible.” But, she says, “I couldn’t leave that story of starvation untold.” She traveled on:

Something strange happened then: the baby that I had imagined as a pea or an avocado pit for weeks and weeks started kicking. He came to life inside me as I entered Somalia, a place where so many people were dying.

Lynsey Addario was pregnant while photographing a child dying from malnutrition in Mogadishu, in August 2011. (Photo/New York Times)

Lynsey Addario was pregnant while photographing a child dying from malnutrition in Mogadishu, in August 2011. (Photo/New York Times)

Working quickly — and trying to avoid kidnapping — she photographed the death of a 1 1/2-year-old boy from malnutrition.

His skeletal chest pumped up and down as he labored to breathe. His eyes rolled back into his head and then forward again as he focused on his mother. I knelt down beside the two women, introduced myself as a journalist and asked permission to photograph. They agreed. I began shooting as the two women put their hands on Abbas’s tiny frame and then onto his face. Each time that his eyes rolled back into his head, the women thought he was dead. To my horror, they began closing his tiny mouth with their hands, a premature death ritual. They were covering his eyes and closing his mouth. As I photographed, I felt my own baby inside of me, kicking and twisting.

In Gaza — caught in the frenzy of a prisoner exchange — Lynsey started to panic.

In the Muslim world, women and children are put on a protected pedestal, and pregnant women are slightly higher up on that pedestal. Naturally, no pregnant woman in Gaza would voluntarily be in that mix of madness, but it was too late to lament my stupidity. I had an idea: I threw my arms up in the air and screamed, “Baby!” and pointed down at my very round stomach with my index fingers on both hands. “Baby!” I screamed again, pointing down.

Lynsey Addario was 27 months pregnant in October 2010, when she photographed children in the Gaza Strip. (Photo/New York Times)

Lynsey Addario was 7 months pregnant in October 2010, when she photographed children in the Gaza Strip. (Photo/New York Times)

All the men around me momentarily paused. They looked at my face and then down at my stomach, and the seas parted. Spontaneously, they made a human gate around me, cocooning me from the crowd. And I continued shooting with my new bodyguards keeping watch over my unborn son and me.

Lukas Simon de Bendern was born perfectly healthy on Dec. 28, 2011, at St. Mary’s Hospital in London.

There is much, much more in this fascinating excerpt from an important book. To read the entire Times story, click here.