Tag Archives: Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario And Maternal Mortality: The NPR Interview

NPR is an auditory medium. But its website complements its radio features. A few days ago, that site featured some stunning photos.

They were taken by Lynsey Addario. The Staples High School graduate has spent the past decade — in addition to covering life in Afghanistan and the plight of Syrian refugees, for publications like the New York Times, National Geographic and Time magazine — documenting the brutal reality of maternal mortality.

Every 2 minutes around the world, a woman dies in childbirth or from pregnancy-related causes. Since 2009, Addario has photographed overcrowded hospitals, bloody delivery room floors and midwives in training.

An overcrowded maternity ward in India. (Photo/Lynsey Addario, courtesy of NPR)

She’s done it thanks to a MacArthur Fellowship. Known popularly as a “Genius Grant,” the no-strings $625,000 award can be used however the recipient sees fit.

Addario has pursued a subject that is not “sexy.” It’s one many editors, readers — even male photojournalism colleagues — don’t understand.

In the NPR interview, Addario talks about a formative experience: watching a woman in Sierra Leone hemorrhage and die.

She describes the intimacy of her photos; her own experience becoming a mother while documenting maternal mortality, and the reality that childbirth is not a Hallmark card.

It’s a fascinating story. Thanks to NPR, it is seen — as well as heard.

(Click here for the full interview. Hat tip: Dick Lowenstein)

The aftermath of a stillbirth in a Somali hospital. The woman survived, thanks to skilled midwives. (Photo/Lynsey Addario, courtesy of NPR)

Andrea Dutton: Westport’s Newest Genius

Andrea Dutton is a genius.

That’s not just hyperbole. The 1991 Staples High School graduate — visiting associate professor of geology at the University of Wisconsin, who investigates changes in sea levels and ice sheet mass — is one of 26 people chosen as 2019 fellows of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

That’s the official wording. The world calls them “genius grants.”

MacArthur fellowships honor “extraordinary originality.” The award is pure genius: a no-strings grant of $625,000, distributed over 5 years.

The fellowships — announced yesterday — went to men and women whose work “pushes the boundaries of disciplines and genres,” says the New York Times.

They include a theater artist who incorporates artificial intelligence into performances; novelists, musicians, scientists, historians, legal advocates, community activists and others. All were chosen “at a moment in their careers when the award might make a difference,” and range in age from 30 to 67.

Andrea Dutton with a fossilized coral reef in the Florida Keys. (Photo/Joshua Bright for Redux)

Potential geniuses are suggested by hundreds of anonymous nominators, in many fields. The final selection is made by a committee — also anonymous.

Dutton calls herself a “detective collecting clues to solve the puzzle of earth’s climate history.

The paleoclimatologist’s work has immense real-life implications. Her reconstruction of sea levels over thousands of years can help predict future rises. In 2017, Rolling Stone magazine listed her among “25 People Shaping the Future in Tech, Science, Medicine, Activism and More.”

Dutton is not Westport’s first MacArthur genius. Photojournalist Lynsey Addario — a fellow 1991 Staples grad — received a fellowship in 2009.

(Click here for the stories of all 26 new MacArthur fellowship awardees. Hat tips: Sandee and Chuck Cole.)

 

Lynsey Addario: Power Player Of The Week — Again

Last December, Lynsey Addario  was named Fox News’ “Power Player of the Week.”

This week, she did it again.

It may have been a slow news week. Or maybe Chris Wallace really likes the Staples High School graduate, who has gone on to earn both a Pulitzer Prize and a MacArthur genius grant.

The “Fox News Sunday” host says that Lynsey Addario takes “riveting photographs that bring the savagery of the front lines into your home.”

Addario claims she is “not brave — just committed.”

Wallace listed the places Addario has worked: Afghanistan. Iraq. Libya. Darfur. South Sudan. Somalia.

She goes there, she says, because it is “fundamental to document” what occurs in those war-torn places.

After photographing skeletons and devastated villages, Addario goes home. There, she tries to explain war — and her work — to her 6-year-old son.

For the full feature, click here.

(Hat tip: Neil Brickley)

Lynsey Addario: Fox News “Power Player Of The Week”

Chris Wallace says that Lynsey Addario takes “riveting photographs that bring the savagery of the front lines into your home.”

The Pulitzer Prize and McArthur grant winner claims she is “not brave — just committed.”

Those quotes — and stunning examples of her work — were shown yesterday. The Westport native and Staples High School graduate was named Fox News’ Power Player of the Week.

Wallace listed the places Addario has worked: Afghanistan. Iraq. Libya. Darfur. South Sudan. Somalia.

She goes there, she says, because it is “fundamental to document” what occurs in those war-torn places.

After photographing skeletons and devastated villages, Addario goes home. There, she tries to explain war — and her work — to her 6-year-old son.

For the full feature, click here.

(Hat tip: Neil Brickley)

Lisa Addario’s “Amateur Night”

Lynsey Addario gets plenty of shout-outs on “06880.”

But the Pulitzer Prize and MacArthur grant-winning New York Times photographer is not the only talented member of the 4-female-sibling family.*

Lisa — a 1986 Staples High School graduate — has just written and directed “Amateur Night” (with her husband, Joe Syracuse).

Based on their early experiences in Hollywood, the film stars Jason Biggs, Janet Montgomery and Ashley Tisdale. It’s also the feature debut for Eddie Murphy’s daughter, Bria Murphy.

“Amateur Night” opens today (Friday, August 5) in New York and Los Angeles. It’s then in select cities — and video on demand — beginning August 12.

Here’s the trailer. Warning: It’s rated R!

*And of course we love their parents, Philip and Camille.


Click here for “06880+”: The easy way to publicize upcoming events, sell items, find or advertise your service, ask questions, etc. It’s the “06880” community bulletin board!

Tyler Hicks Wins Another Pulitzer Prize

Most journalists dream of winning a Pulitzer Prize.

Tyler Hicks needs a new dream.

The Westport native and Staples High School graduate earned his 3rd Pulitzer in 7 years today. He shared the award for Breaking News in Photography with 2 fellow New York Times photojournalists. The trio were honored for their images that “captured the resolve of refugees, the perils of their journeys and the struggle of host countries to take them in.”

This photo by Tyler Hicks appears on the Pulitzer Prize website. The caption reads: "After battling rough seas and high winds from Turkey, migrants arrive by rubber raft on a jagged shoreline of the Greek island of Lesbos. Fearing capsize or puncture, some panicked and jumped into the cold water in desperation to reach land. This young boy made it, unlike hundreds of others." (Photo/Tyler Hicks, The New York Times - October 1, 2015). 

This photo by Tyler Hicks appears on the Pulitzer Prize website. The caption reads: “After battling rough seas and high winds from Turkey, migrants arrive by rubber raft on a jagged shoreline of the Greek island of Lesbos. Fearing capsize or puncture, some panicked and jumped into the cold water in desperation to reach land. This young boy made it, unlike hundreds of others.” (Photo/Tyler Hicks, The New York Times – October 1, 2015). Click image to enlarge.

Hicks’ previous Pulitzers came in 2009 (as a member of a team, for International Reporting coverage of Afghanistan and Pakistan), and 2014 (for Breaking News Photography, for his stunning shots of the deadly attack by terrorists on a Nairobi shopping center.)

Hicks began working for the Times in 1999, photographing stories throughout Africa. After 9/11, he traveled to Kabul, documenting the city’s liberation from the Taliban. He has returned to Afghanistan often.

Hicks has done award-winning work around the globe, from Haiti to Albania and Kosovo.

Tyler Hicks

Tyler Hicks

On March 16, 2011 Hicks and 3 other reporters — including fellow Times photojournalist and Westporter Lynsey Addario were abducted in Libya. After 6 harrowing days in captivity, they were released. (Click here for more details.)

On Feb. 16, 2012 in Syria, Hicks was with Times Beirut bureau chief Anthony Shadid, when Shadid died of an asthma attack. Hicks helped carry the journalist’s body across the border to Turkey.

When he gets a chance, Hicks visits Westport, where his mother and sister still live. He now calls Kenya home.

But — as his important, eye-opening Pulitzer Prize-winning photos attest — the world’s hot spots are truly his home.

PS: Congrats too to Matt Davies. The 1985 Staples grad was one of 2 finalists for the Pulitzer Prize in Editorial Cartooning. Davies — who now draws for Newsday — won the Pulitzer in 2004, and was also a finalist in 2011.

(For full details of the Pulitzer Prize in Breaking Photography, click here.)

Lynsey Addario’s Latest Story

Today, Nile Rodgers was the focus of a New York Times feature.

Tomorrow, Lynsey Addario focuses on a Times Magazine cover story.

The issue examines the plight of displaced people around the globe. Lynsey —  a Pulitzer Prize and MacArthur genius grant winner, and a Staples High School graduate — contributes stunning photos from Syria, South Sudan and Ukraine.

Lynsey has a knack for finding heartbreak — and, amid it sometimes, hope — around the globe. This story is some of her most harrowing, and important, work.

(Photo/Lynsey Addario for the New York Times)

(Photo/Lynsey Addario for the New York Times)

Click here for the stories, and Lynsey’s remarkable images.

(Hat tip: John Karrel)

 

Lynsey’s Love Fest

Maxine Bleiweis has mastermined 17 “Booked for the Evenings.”

But tonight was her first honoring a homegrown hero.

Lynsey Addario — Pulitzer Prize winner, MacArthur genius grant awardee, inspiration for an upcoming Steven Spielberg movie and now best-selling author — drew a packed house to the Westport Library.

Friends from childhood, friends of her parents, family members (including her 102-year-old grandmother), and just proud Westporters, they were already impressed by the New York Times photojournalist. When they saw her compelling images, heard her harrowing stories of her work in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Darfur and Libya, they left even more awed.

Lynsey Addario speaking tonight at the Westport Library's

Lynsey Addario speaking tonight at the Westport Library’s “Booked for the Evening.” One of her vivid photographs is projected behind her.

It was a hometown evening. Actress Cynthia Gibb (Staples High School Class of ’81) read excerpts from Lynsey’s book, It’s What I Do: A Photographer’s Life of Love and War. Doug Tirola (Staples ’84) produced a tribute video (narrated by CNN anchor and Easton native Ivan Watson). Eli Koskoff (Staples ’15, and Lynsey’s colleague Tyler Hicks’ nephew) played guitar.

Lynsey was called “brilliant, articulate, warm, engaging and very kind” — and she did not disappoint. She gave shout-outs to her sisters, parents, and the town she grew up in. All helped provide the one quality that, she said, every photojournalist needs: “being non-judgmental.”

It was a wonderful evening: for Lynsey, for Westport, and for the library that — in 17 years of “Booked” events — has raised over $3 million.

As New York Times Magazine director of photography Kathy Ryan said: “This is the rocking-est library I’ve ever seen!”

Lynsey Addario’s “Booked For The Evening”: The Back Story

The Westport Library’s “Booked for the Evening” fundraiser is always special. Previous honorees have included Tom Brokaw, E.L. Doctorow, Calvin Trillin, Wendy Wasserstein, Pete Hamill, Martin Scorsese, Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Halberstam, Oscar Hijuelos, Adam Gopnik, Will Shortz and Patti Smith.

This year, though, is especially special. On Saturday, May 9 (7:30 p.m.), the library welcomes Lynsey Addario. She’s a Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist, MacArthur “Genius Grant” winner, internationally known role model — and a Westporter.

Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario

Lynsey’s accomplishments are — well, special. Working for the New York TimesNational Geographic and Time, she has documented life and oppression under Taliban rule in Afghanistan; conflicts in Iraq, Libya, Lebanon, Darfur and Congo, and humanitarian and human rights issues across the Middle East, South Asia and Africa.

Now, Lynsey is a noted author. It’s What I Do: A Photographer’s Life of Love and War is an insighful, inspiring memoir. It’s also been optioned as a big-time film. Steven Spielberg will direct it, with Jennifer Lawrence playing Lynsey.

None of which may have been possible without our special Westport Library.

The other day, I asked Lynsey if she recalled her early library days.

Boy, did she.

Her parents came to Westport in the 1960s to open a salon, Phillips. They had finished hairdressing school in New Haven, and were attracted to Westport’s thriving, creative atmosphere. Artists and authors seemed to be everywhere.

As a Coleytown Elementary School student, Lynsey remembers making field trips to the “old” library. In that building, on the Post Road and Parker Harding Plaza — where Starbucks and Freshii are now — she learned how to use the card catalog, and search for books.

The "old" library, where a young Lynsey Addario learned a lot.

The “old” library, where a young Lynsey Addario learned a lot.

The “new” library — the one next to the Levitt Pavilion — opened when Lynsey was at Staples. She was discovering photography, and used the library to learn more about the field.

Today, most of Lynsey’s research is done via the internet. But she knows how important libraries are.

At the University of Wisconsin, she spent “countless” nights researching papers and utilizing resources.

“I have always seen libraries as sanctuaries,” Lynsey says. “Now, I work primarily in war zones. Basic resources like food, water, electricity and shelter are a priority. Libraries would be the greatest luxury in these places. They are a sad casualty of the realities of war.”

Lynsey Addario photographed this young girl, who died delivering twins. The Sierra Leonean wanted to earn a degree, but at 14 was forced into marriage. (Photo/Lynsey Addario for NPR)

Lynsey Addario photographed this young girl, who died delivering twins. The Sierra Leonean wanted to earn a degree, but at 14 was forced into marriage. (Photo/Lynsey Addario for NPR)

The Westport Library is many things, to many people. We all use it in different, and varied, ways. But all of us find — and learn — something there.

On May 9, we can learn a little bit from Lynsey Addario — who learned more than a little bit in our own across-the-street library, a very brief lifetime ago.

(For more information on “Booked for the Evening” — including tickets — click here.)

It’s Official: Lynsey Addario Is A Star

Last night she reached the top of the food chain: an appearance on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.”

The segment was not hilarious. It was harrowing — as the Staples graduate/Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist/MacArthur “genius” grant winner recounted her 2 kidnappings — but also very instructive.

Lynsey Addario Jon Stewart

Stewart called Lynsey’s new book — It’s What I Do — “fascinating and phenomenal.” He ended the segment with a shot of her after her wedding, and announced, “You have a life. And you are a person.”

She is indeed. Westport has long known that.

Now the world does too.

(To see Lynsey Addario’s “Daily Show” appearance, click here.)