Tag Archives: Westport Fire Department

UPDATE AND CORRECTION: Alert: Nixle Replaces Code Red

NOTE: The earlier version of this story said to “dial” 888777 from your mobile phone. You should TEXT that number to sign up. My apologies!

For the past 4 years, the Westport Police Department has used Nixle to provide traffic advisories.

Now, the WPD and Westport Fire Department have partnered with Nixle to offer a Community Notification System. Residents can sign up to receive localized emergency situation and relevant community advisories.

This system replaces the CodeRED emergency notification system in use here since 2009.

All alerts are targeted geographically, allowing residents to receive localized, relevant alerts from the Fire and Police Departments.

Nixle sends out immediate emergency notification — for instance, for flash flooding downtown. (Photo/Jacques Voris)

Nixle sends info via text, email, voice, web, and social media in an instant.

Town officials say residents and business owners should not assume your number is registered.

To sign up, dial 888777 from your mobile phone. Then text the zip code: 06880.

You can customize your alert setting by logging on to www.nixle.com, and creating a User Profile.

Do it today. You don’t know when the next emergency will strike.

(Hopefully not tomorrow. The last 2 Tuesdays have been brutal. Perhaps the 3rd time will be charm.)

Water, Water, Everywhere

Yesterday’s flash floods — the result of 7 inches of rain in some parts of town — caused widespread disruption and damage.

Roads turned into swirling rivers. Lakes suddenly appeared from nowhere. Some drivers turned around. Some tried carefully to get through. Others plowed right in.

Iris Greenfield was not rash or hasty. Still, her car was completely submerged under the South Compo Road railroad bridge. She and 2 of her children were rescued through the window by Westport firefighters.

The scene on South Compo, even after the worst of the waters receded. (Photo/Iris Greenfield)

It was dramatic and heroic. When they finally reached solid ground, the firefighter who carried Iris out asked, “aren’t you the acupuncturist?”

Yep. He was a former patient. And her son recognized him by name.

Skye Greenfield wrote this letter of thanks to the Westport Fire Department:

As of 7 this morning, Compo Road South at the railroad overpass was still closed due to flooding. Roseville Road at Salem Road was also closed..

Meanwhile, Morley Boyd offers this report from Violet Lane, off Myrtle Avenue directly across from Sconset Square:

“One house lost its furnace, hot water heater, washing machine, dryer and I guess AC. Our driveway is gone — all down on Myrtle now. This was the worst flooding in downtown we’ve seen since 1968.”

Myrtle Avenue was completely submerged at the height of yesterday’s flood. (Photo/Joyce Joiner)

 

Westport Firefighter Battles Western Blaze

California’s wildfires are snagging all the headlines.

But other states face fires too.

They need help. And — just as the rest of the country sends aid when we’re battered by hurricanes or blizzards — Connecticut firefighters have headed west.

Deputy Chief Michael Kronick joined 18 other members of the CT Interstate Fire Crew. They traveled last month to Colorado, where thousands of acres burned in the Buttermilk and Green Mountain Fires.

Kronick returned home last night.

Deputy Fire Chief Michael Kronick, in Colorado.

Connecticut participates in a reciprocal aid program operated by the US Forest Service. The state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection maintains a roster of staff and personnel from local fire departments who are certified to fight wildfires.

Kronick — a member of the Connecticut Interstate Fire Crew since 2002 — has been deployed on 11 wildfires throughout North America. He’s a great representative of Westport’s superb Fire Department.

Westport — and Colorado — salute Deputy Fire Chief Michael Kronick!

Colorado wildfire

 

Fire Department Tour: A Day To Remember

“06880” reader Sharon Maddern sent this letter to 1st Selectman Jim Marpe, Fire Chief Robert Yost and Deputy Fire Chief Brian Meadows. But it’s worth sharing with a much larger audience:

I’d like to let you know about an outstanding experience my son and I recently had visiting the Westport Fire Department, and what an impressive, dedicated and professional team they are.

My son Derek is 21. Though he has some disabilities, he is a huge firefighter fan. He listens to all the calls over the scanners, and follows them online. For him this was a super-exciting day.

With the help of Sal Liccione, who set up the visit, we arrived on a Saturday morning. I expected a basic 20-minute overview. But our guide, Lt. Jonathan Piper — a veteran fireman of 20-plus years — gave us an incredibly informative tour of the facility. Even I was enthralled by the advanced technology, and his extensive knowledge of all the sophisticated equipment.

He explained the various roles of the department beyond firefighting, including HazMat and emergency responses like pulling cars out of ditches.

We also got a firsthand look at the new fire engines.

Derek gets a close-up look at a Westport fire truck.

I cannot tell you how meaningful this was to my son, and how appreciative I am of the time Jon took with us. Even I could follow his articulate, enthusiastic and patient explanations!

While I have spent the last 17 years working in commercial real estate in Westport, I was never aware of the extent that the fire department and these men are involved in: all the day-to-day aspects of our safety, including road hazards, building inspections, alarm responses, etc.

I hope that the WFD continues to receive Westport’s respect and the funding that it deserves, as they have an enormous burden of responsibility. They are an invaluable part of the community, and should be generously supported in their endeavors to continue to provide such an efficient, effective resource for the town.

This was a day both my son and I will always remember. Our thanks go out to the WFD!

Sunset Drama On Sunrise

Sunrise Road was not made for 18-wheelers.

The driver of a truck filled with 43,000 pounds of refrigerated meat — bound from Minnesota to West Haven — learned that out the hard way last night at 7.

He tried to make a right turn onto Saugatuck Avenue — no easy feat even for Mini Coopers. Soon, he was hung up on a stone wall.

Alert “06880” reader Gerald F. Romano Jr. was on the scene. For the next 2 1/2 hours, he says, Westport police and firefighters did a great job. A crew from Quality Towing unloaded 10,000 pounds of meat off the truck.

That lightened the load, so the Quality guys could pull the rear wheels off the wall. No one one was injured. The driver — who said this was his first incident in 40 years — drove off.

(All photos Gerald F. Romano Jr.)

“It all ended well,” Romano says.

But just imagine if the driver had headed for the William F. Cribari Bridge.

Westport Firefighter: “Every Neighborhood Deserves To Be Safe”

Some of us look at Westport’s new, large homes and say “oh no!”

Others say “aaah!”

Nick Marsan sees them and thinks “uh oh!”

He’s a Westport firefighter. He knows that — with their open floor plan — new construction burns faster than old.

He also knows that — with just 2 men assigned to one engine in both the Greens Farms and Coleytown fire stations — the situation is dire.

Two men, one engine at the Greens Farms fire station.

Marsan is also president of Westport Uniformed Firefighters IAFF Local 1081.

So he’s decided to speak out.

“Family safety is our number one priority,” he says. “Unfortunately, we’ve reached a point where we can no longer protect you in the way you deserve.”

A 2-person engine crew has limited responses, Marsan says. They can choose to rescue a trapped family member — no easy task, in a large house. Or they can attempt to extinguish the fire.

Marsan says national standards recommend 4 firefighters per engine, to safely battle a house fire in a 2,200 square foot residence.

Westport’s average home size is 5,500 square feet, Marsan notes. He’s asking for only 3 firefighters.

The issue dates back to 2007, he says. Town officials agreed then to 3 firefighters per truck.

But the recession hit. Faced with budget choices, politicians pulled back to 2 per truck — and changed post-retirement benefits for new hires.

The new pension plan will save Westport $40 million over the next 20 years, Marsan says.

So, he believes, “now is the time to put 3 people  on every truck, in every station. The savings are there.”

Every Westporter, he adds — regardless of where in town they live — “deserves a safe and effective response.”

The Westport Fire Department “will continue to do a very professional and dedicated job,” Marsan says.

“We just want as much safety as possible — for Westporters, ourselves, and our own families.”

A Ducky Rescue

Most Westport Fire Department press releases describe house blazes, motor vehicle extrications and hazardous waste clean-ups.

This one’s different. 

And one more reason why we love our firefighters:

 Earlier this evening, Westport Fire Department dispatchers received numerous calls for an animal rescue on I-95. A family of ducks had been observed trying to navigate I-95 at rush hour, resulting in 9 ducklings falling into a storm drain.

Rescue 3 and the shift commander responded to I-95 North to provide assistance, meeting up with state police troopers just prior to exit 17. A Department of Transportation Safety Patrol vehicle provided critical barrier protection for those working on the highway.

Removing the grate for the rescue.

Firefighters used a variety of hand tools, hydraulic rescue tools and metering equipment to gain access to the storm drain. Firefighter Andrew Ponticiello entered the storm drain via a ladder and patiently rescued all 9 of the ducklings, despite their reluctance to exit. This was his second animal rescue from a storm drain in as many days.

Firefighter Andrew Ponticiello, with his 9 ducklings.

As a reminder, if you are concerned about the welfare of any animal — particularly when the animals are on a highway or main road — call 911 and ask for assistance. The roads and highways are dangerous places to be. We want to make sure everyone goes home safely.

Volunteer Firefighters Fill A Need — And Need You!

Westport’s fire department is older than Westport itself.

The volunteer Saugatuck Fire Company was incorporated in 1832 — 3 years before the town did the same. Equipment consisted of one hand engine.

In 1859, Westporters formed Compo Engine Company #2. Almost immediately they saved a lumber yard and adjoining buildings, when a candle factory caught fire.

Five years later Vigilant Engine Company #3 was organized on Wilton Road, in part because of the Post Road drawbridge. When it was up, engines could not cross the river.

The Vigilant Firehouse on Wilton Road, circa 1977.

Main Street, Pioneer Hook & Ladder, and the Saugatuck Hose Company followed.

In the early 1900s E.T. Bedford donated money and land for the Greens Farms Company. After World War II, the Coleytown Company was formed to serve that rapidly expanding part of town.

All those firefighters were volunteers.

The career department was established in 1929, with 2 paid firefighters. The first paid chief was hired in 1937.

But volunteers served vital functions, particularly as the town grew.

Gradually, volunteer companies folded. The only firehouses that remain — besides the Post Road headquarters — are on Riverside Avenue, Easton Road and Center Street. All are staffed by career firefighters.

The Saugatuck firehouse. The sign still says “Hose Co.”

Volunteers remain active. They’re still important.

But their numbers are dwindling.

Westport has changed. There are more dual-income families, greater demands on time, fewer blue-collar folks residents. At the same time, training demands have increased. Minimum state certification requires 180 hours of classroom and hands-on instruction, plus 24 hours riding a truck every 3 months.

The trend is nationwide.

But Westport needs its volunteers. With so many large and expensive homes, 2 bustling commercial districts, the Post Road, many offices, 3 beaches, Longshore, I-95, the Merritt Parkway and Metro-North, our very professional and well-respected career fire department has a lot to handle.

Westport firefighters respond to 3,500 calls a year — nearly 10 a day. They  include not only fires, but medical calls, motor vehicle accidents, odors, and much more.

Ken Gilbertie is a volunteer. Since joining in the early 1980s, he’s risen to the role of deputy chief of the Westport Volunteer Fire Department. He’s also a civilian dispatcher. He loves what he does.

And he’d like some help.

Ken Gilbertie, at his dispatch station.

“We don’t need muscle power,” the native Westporter says. “Just able-bodied people willing to do hard work.”

There’s no pay. In fact, volunteers must purchase their own protective equipment. Boots, pants, a coat, helmet and gloves can run $1700. The money comes in part from a townwide fundraiser.

What volunteers get is “a load of satisfaction. It’s a great feeling to know you’ve made a significant contribution to someone, on their worst day,” Gilbertie says.

Donna Cohen is a volunteer too. The PR executive and event planner walked in one day and asked how she could help.

“There’s a real team feeling with volunteers,” she notes. “There’s a social aspect too. This is such a good way to give back to the community.”

You know — the community that had not even been named nearly 2 centuries ago, when our first volunteer firefighters banded together to help their neighbors.

(For more information, email kgilbertie@westportct.gov)

No, these firefighters are not posing for the camera during an actual fire. It’s training, using a house that would be torn down. It was donated for the exercise.

Kudos!

Over 1,700 Westporters are still without power. Restoration continues slowly.

Wednesday’s storm — the 2nd in 5 days — took its toll on much of New York and New England.

But as we’re recovering from that double whammy, let’s realize how good we actually have it.

Our public officials and town employees really earned their pay this week. In no particular order, we owe huge thanks to:

Westport Police Department. They’ve been vigilant in responding to calls, assessing damage, helping work crews, and keeping the town safe and secure. They’re stretched thin — but every man and woman on the force responded. (NOTE to impatient citizens: Those traffic barricades are up for a reason. Click on the video from New Jersey below — but beware. It’s gruesome.)

Westport Fire Department. At the height of the storm Wednesday night, they answered literally hundreds of calls. From live wires and fallen trees to actual fires, they covered the town. They were often the first eyes on an incident, and they coordinated expertly with other town offices. On Thursday and through today, they’ve kept going. Their red trucks — and the firefighters on them — are a truly welcome sight. And they seem to be everywhere.

Public Works Department. They’re the guys who are actually out there, working all day and night. They plow the roads, remove the trees, and do all the other dirty work that enables the rest of us to carry on with our lives. It’s tough, demanding, physical work. And they haven’t had a break in days.

First Selectman Jim Marpe. He’s the man at the top. His calm, efficient yet commanding presence has inspired everyone else — at the emergency operations center, and in the field — to do their jobs. Jim believes in public service, and he makes sure every public official serves the town well.

Everyone else in emergency operations too. I don’t know everyone’s names. But quietly and effectively, they managed back-to-back storms with professionalism and care.

Superintendent of schools Colleen Palmer. She had to make difficult, irrevocable, damned-if-you-do, damned-if-you-don’t choices about closing school.  That comes with the territory. But she went above and beyond, communicating often and clearly about how and why she made those decisions. Today she threaded the needle — opening school, but not penalizing students for absences, and postponing all tests and quizzes. She “weathered” criticism with grace — and kept thousands of youngsters safe.

School maintenance staffs. They shoveled tons of heavy snow, and did all the other work, to ensure that schools could open today. They were there at the height of the storm. No one saw what they did — but today we noticed how much they did.

I’m sure I’ve forgotten other key men and women in town. If you know anyone I’ve missed, click “Comments” below.

Public Works takes care of downed trees. Police put up barricades. It takes a village to help our town weather 2 storms since last Friday. (Photo/Janette Kinnally)

Nor’easter Keeps Pounding

More dramatic photos from today’s storm:

The Saugatuck River rises close to its banks. (Photo/Robin Gusick)

A flooded parking garage on Riverside Avenue. (Photo/Robin Gusick)

Meanwhile, firefighters raced to Saugatuck Shores. They trudged through cold water, in high winds, to fight a smoky blaze on Canal Road.

Local builder Oliver Wilson rescued a dog from the house, before the fire department arrived. There was no one else inside.

A fire truck navigates flooded streets. (Photo/Gene Borio)

Firefighters trudged through flooded streets to fight the blaze. (Photo/Jeff Manchester)