Tag Archives: Westport League of Women Voters

Roundup: Halloween Parade, Mike Sansur, Paul Newman …

Halloween comes early!

The annual downtown Children’s Halloween Parade is set for next Wednesday (October 26). Kids and parents meet at the Post Road East/Main Street intersection at 3:30 p.m.

They’ll march up Main Street, turn right to Avery Place, then turn left on Myrtle Avenue to Town Hall and Veterans Green. Children may trick-or-treat along Main Street and outside Town Hall. 

Entertainment, refreshments and a small gift will be provided on Veterans Green across from Town Hall at 4 p.m. 

The Parks and Recreation Department, Westport Downtown Association and Westport P.A.L. are sponsoring the event. It’s for all children — “especially those 8 and under.”

NOTE: There is no parkin on Main Street between 2 and 4 p.m. during the parade.

Seen at a previous Halloween parade.

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The Westport Education Association is raising funds to honor one of its own.

Beloved Staples High School technology education teacher Mike Sansur was killed Saturday, when his vehicle was rear-ended on I-95. His 21-year-old son — who is studying to be a teacher too — is hospitalized with serious injuries.

A GoFundMe page will help defray medical costs for Mike’s son, and help with future college costs for his 2 high school daughters.

The WEA says, “Mike touched the hearts of all students who walked through his door. A former student said was the “the only class where I felt like I belonged. He opened up a world of possibilities, and a desire to learn more. He taught the importance of attention to detail, design, and craftsmanship, which influenced me to pursue architecture. As I write this, the lamp he helped me build is still on my desk. Its light will not go out.”

Click here to contribute, and for more information.

Mike Sansur

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In the wake of “The Extraordinary Life of an Ordinary Man” — Paul Newman’s new memoir — it’s hard to keep up with media mentions.

But a story in the current issue of The New Yorker caught my eye.

Twice, writer Louis Menand references the book’s genesis: over 100 interviews with and about the actor, conducted by his screenwriter friend Stewart Stern.

But in 1991, Newman asked Stern to stop. In 1998, Newman “took the cassettes to the dump and burned them all.”

Later, Menand mentions the incident again: “the auto-da-fé at the town dump seems a pretty clear indication that Newman did not want a memoir.”

The New Yorker is well known for its rigorous fact-checking.

It seems pretty clear that “the town dump” is our town dump. After all, this is where Newman lived. It’s where he kept the tapes.

But wait! We don’t have a “town dump.” It’s a “transfer station.”

And there’s no place there to burn anything.

So … maybe Paul Newman did not burn those hundreds of tapes here, but somewhere else?

Or maybe they were never burned at all?!

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One of the major themes of “From the Mississippi Delta” — the current Westport Country Playhouse production — is civil rights.

That’s inextricably tied in with voting rights. So — with an election looming next month — Westport’s League of Women Voters is offering political information in the Playhouse lobby through the show’s run. It ends on October 30.

For over 70 years, the LWV has been a non-partisan Westport institution. They do not support individual candidates; instead they advocate for voter education and enfranchisement. They actively register voters, and organize candidate debates.

Before each performance of “From the Mississippi Delta,” LWV volunteers will offer information on times, locations and requirements for voting in the November 8 mid-term election, including how to get an absentee ballot and online registration.

They will conduct in-person voter registration for people with valid identification (driver’s license, passport, or Social Security card).

The LWV will also explain the ballot referendum about adding days to voting in Connecticut. Right now, we are one of only one 4 states that limits voting to one day.

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Before Halloween and Election Day, there’s another holiday.

United Nations Day is not a big one. Except for the people who believe in things like, um, world peace.

To celebrate, the United Nations Association of Southwestern Connecticut is sponsoring a talk and Q-and-A at the Westport Library (October 24, 7 p.m.).

Dr. Mary Evelyn Tucker, co-founder of the Yale Forum on Religion & Ecology, will speak on “Reimagining Our Environmental Future Together.” Her goal is to inspire people to “preserve, protect and restore the earth community.”

After nearly 3 COVID years away from cabaret,  Leslie Orofino is back. And “Laughing at Life.”

This Ruth Steinkraus Cohen Lecture honors the founder of the UNASC. She was  a longtime Westporter, and advocate for all things UN-related.

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Speaking of world peace: World-famous photojournalist (and 1991 Staples High School graduate) Lynsey Addario has spent more than 2 decades reporting in the face of conflict, corruption and censorship. She’s done it in the Middle East and Africa; now she capturing the horrors of war in Ukraine.

On November 9, she’ll receive a “Courage in Journalism” award from the International Women’s Media Foundation.

The virtual ceremony is set for November 9 (5:30 p.m.). CBS News’ Norah O’Donnell will host. Click here for free registration, and more information. (Hat tip: Naree Viner)

Lynsey Addario

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Westport’s prized vocalist joins director (and fellow townie) Louis Pietig in 2 performances at New York City’s Don’t Tell Mama.

“Laughing at Life” — that’s the show’s name — is a “foot-stomping, life-affirming journey of love.” It includes songs by Alberta Hunter, Fats Waller, Cole Porter, Bob Dylan and many others.

The first show is this Saturday (October 22); the next is Sunday, October 30. Both are at 4 p.m. There’s a $20 cover, with a 2-drink minimum. Click here for reservations.

Leslie Orofino

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Not much gets by Bob Weingarten.

He spotted frost yesterday morning on a Morningside Drive South roof.

“It’s the first of the season,” he reports.

Spring arrives in 152 days.

Frosty roof. (Photo/Bob Weingarten)

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Autumn continues to awe. Jonathan Alloy sends along today’s spectacular “Westport … Naturally” foliage. It’s at Long Lots Elementary School. Similar scenes can be found all over town.

But not for long.

(Photo/Jonathan Alloy)

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And finally …  On this date in 1977, Lynyrd Skynyrd’s plane crashed in the Mississippi woods. Six people, including 3 band members, were killed.

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Roundup: Deer, Alaska, Trump …

A deer in distress has been wandering around the Long Lots Lane/Keene Road area.

Tangled in what looks like a badminton net, its gaunt appearance suggests it cannot see to forage for food.

Residents who spot the deer should call Westport Animal Control (203-341-5076) pr Wildlife in Crisis (203-544-9913). They are aware of the situation, and are ready to help.

Ruth Ayles, who sent this photo — which she saw on Facebook — reminds residents to properly dispose of balloons (or skip them all together).

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You’ve probably seen the ads for ABC and Hulu’s new drama “Alaska Daily,” which debuts tonight.

They’re hard to miss.

But all the marketing for the Hilary Swank show neglect to mention Gabe Sherman’s contributions.

The Westport native is a key writer on “Alaska Daily.” He’s collaborating with Tom McCarthy, who executive produced a show based on Sherman’s book about Fox News, “The Loudest Voice.” For a rave preview of the series, click here.

In addition to this TV project, Sherman is a regular writer for Vanity  Fair.

Gabe Sherman

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Elections loom in a month. Westport’s League of Women Voters is ready.

They want you to be, too.

They want everyone to know about Vote411.org, It’s a national information center. Type in your address, and get all the voting information you need.

On November 2 (7 p.m., Westport Library Trefz Forum and Zoom), the LWV sponsors a candidates’ debate. Included are Senate District 26 hopefuls Toni Boucher and Ceci Maher, House District 136 (Alma Sarelli, Jonathan Steinberg), and House District 143 (Nicole Hampton, Dominique Johnson).

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Speaking of politics: Check out the latest “Cross Examining History” podcast (link below).

Host Talmage Boston — a 1972 Staples High School graduate — interviews Peter Baker and Susan Glasser about their new book about “The Divider,” about Donald Trump.

The entire series, in fact, is worth hearing. Boston examines American history and leading books, through in-depth and entertaining interviews.

That’s only one of Boston’s many talents. He’s a commercial trial and appellate litigator in Dallas, a Texas Monthly “Super Lawyer” with a sideline as a writer, on topics as diverse as baseball history and Teddy Roosevelt.

 

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There’s something new at Old Mill Grocery: tables.

Three handsome, sturdy tables now welcome customers to sit inside. The Hillspoint Road spot continues to attract a steady stream of guests.

As OMG transitions to fall, regular dinner specials are an added attraction.

Old Mill Grocery tables. (Photo/Dan Woog)

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Westport’s Representative Town Meeting is seeking candidates to fill the vacancy created by the passing of Arline Gertzoff. The vacancy must be filled by a registered voter residing in RTM District 3.  No party affiliation is required, as Westport’s RTM is non-partisan.  The term expires November 28, 2023.

Residents of RTM District 3 interested in being considered to fill the vacancy should send a resume by October 14 to JDunkerton@westportct.gov.

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Wait! The Remarkable Theater drive-in movie season is not yet over!

They’ve just added another film. It’s tomorrow night — and it’s the 1941 Disney kids’ classic “Dumbo.”

The Imperial Avenue parking lot opens at 5:45 p.m. for tailgating. The show begins at 6:45. Click here for tickets.

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Everyone talks about historic preservation in Westport.

But — as homes and buildings as old as 200 years, and as new as 20, fall to the wrecking ball — what are our greatest protection needs?

The Westport Historic District Commission recently received a Historic Preservation Enhancement Grant from the State Historic Preservation Office.

Funds will be used to hire a consultant to prepare a town “Preservation Plan.” It will identify and prioritize the greatest areas of need for historic preservation.

The plan will also will help establish and prioritize more Local Historic Districts and Local Historic Designations.

Properties within a Local Historic District have a higher degree of protection. The HDC must approve an application for alteration to a historic structure, as well as any new construction within a district.

Gorham Avenue is one of Westport’s Historic Districts.

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Push Against Cancer is a family affair.

Jessica and Keith Larit’s daughters Emma, Leah and Katie wanted to do something special for the kids of the Hole in the Wall Gang Camp. Their idea: a “Kids Helping Kids” bake sale.

On October 16 (Staples High School, 9 a.m.), everyone attending the 13th annual Push Against Cancer can do push-ups for pledges — and then reward themselves with tasty treats.

Katie says, “I enjoy helping because all kids deserve to have fun at camp.”

Emma adds, “I hope we can raise enough money to send hundreds of kids and their families to camp to have fun.”

Click here for more information on the Push Against Cancer.

Andrew Berman (red shirt), CEO and founder of Push Against Cancer, with
Emma, Leah and Katie Larit, and their parents Keith and Jessica. The sign refers to this year’s event, which will surpass $1 million raised in 13 years.

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“The Afro-Semitic Experience” is the intriguing title of the next Y’s Women meeting.

In 1998 Dr. David Chevan, professor of music at Southern Connecticut State University and Hartford native Warren Byrd co-founded a 6-piece group of Jewish American and African American musicians. The Afro-Semitic Experience has performed, recorded and taught together ever since.

On October 10 (Greens Farms Church. 10:45 a.m.), they’ll share stories and songs, and discuss their conviction that people of different faiths, races and beliefs can come together with music to celebrate and build community.

Click here for more information.

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“From the Pen to the Knife” is MoCA Westport’s new exhibit. A free opening reception is set for October 15 (5 to 7 p.m.).

The collection is by artist 90-year-old Marian Christy. She creates innovative watercolors using only palette knives and puddles of paint — no drawing or brushes. Click here for information.

One of Marian Christy’s nearly 300 works, exhibited soon at MoCA Westport.

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Westport Community Gardens director — and superb nature photographer — Lou Weinberg sends this superb “Westport … Naturally” image:

(Photo/Lou Weinberg)

Lou notes: “The magical honeybee is not just a great pollinator. It is also an acrobat, sitting out the rain vertically on glass!”

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And finally … on this date in 1927, “The Jazz Singer” — the first full-length “talkie” (sound) movie premiered. The site was Warner Bros.’ flagship New York City theater.

Wikipedia notes: “In keeping with the film’s theme of a conflict within a Jewish family, the film premiered after sunset on the eve of the Yom Kippur holiday.”

Among the many notable performances in the movie: Al Jolson’s performance of “Mammy.” Though he wore blackface, as other entertainers in the era did, he was known as a strong advocate for racial justice, particularly on Broadway.

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Roundup: RTM, Inklings, Pop-Up Thrift Shop …

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Admit it: You hear “RTM” all the time. And you don’t know a thing about it.

Well, for one thing, it stands for “Representative Town Meeting.” For another, it’s our special local legislative body.

For a third, Westport’s League of Women Voters is sponsoring a series of “Know Your Town” events. And — wouldn’t you know it — the first one is “Know Your RTM.”

Set for this Wednesday (March 23, 7 p.m., Westport Library Trefz Forum and Zoom), the all-star (and all-RTM) panel includes former moderator Velma Heller, who’ll discuss the body’s history; member Matthew Mandell (today’s RTM), and current moderator Jeff Wieser (why you should run for office).

Click here to register for in-person attendance. Click here for the Zoom link.

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For the first time ever, Inklings — the nearly 100-year-old Staples High School publication — earned a Columbia Scholastic Press Association Gold Crown award for Hybrid News. Only 16 other high schools in the country received that honor.

Inklings has won numerous Gold Circle Awards for individual reporter excellence, along with overall Silver Crowns. This is the first Gold Crown since switching to a magazine model — and it came in Inklings’ first year with the format.

“I think the change in layout and design spoke to our strengths,” says co-advisor Mary Elizabeth Fulco. ” I’m so incredibly proud of our hard-working students for achieving this national recognition.” The other advisor is Joe Del Gobbo.

In order to be eligible for a Crown, a newspaper must first achieve a Gold Circle Award for individual reporting. This year’s honorees were Lyah Muktavaram for “Piglet: The Deaf, Blind, Pink Puppy Embarks on New Chapter,” and Katie Simons for “Rodrigo’s Debut Album ‘SOUR’ Captures the Essence of Adolescence.”

For more information, and a list of all winners, click here. For Inklings online,, click here.

The cover of Inklings’ February magazine featured indoor track athletes heading to the national meet.

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Fast fashion — mass production of cheap clothing that destroys resources and pollutes the planet — is endemic.

On March 28 (6:30 p.m., Wakeman Town Farm), WTF sponsors a “Sustainability Forum.”

Panelists will discuss the effects of fast fashion on our environment, consumers and workers. Attendees will learn how to identify sustainable businesses, make smarter buying choices, and what it means to be a conscious consumer.

There’s also a spotlight on local sustainable clothing business, including Our Woven Community, The Exchange Project and Shop Tomorrows.

Click here to register.

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Meanwhile, a few yards south of the Town Farm, a group of Staples High School students is doing something about fast fashion too.

The school’s Zero Waste Committee is creating a pop-up thrift store, The EcoBoutique opens April 27 during lunch waves in the courtyard.

Whether you’re a student, parent or just a Westporter interested in the planet, you can help.

The Zero Waste Committee is collecting donations (gently used clothing, handers and bins) from March 28 to April 11, at Staples’ front atrium.

In addition to education the community about the importance of limiting fast fashion, and thrifting, funds from the pop-up thrift store will help the ZWC’s sustainability initiatives: composting, recycling and more.

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Eurovision — the European singing contest that began in the 1950s, and brought fame to bands like ABBA — is coming to the US.

Instead of a variety of countries, our version — “The American Song Contest” — includes acts from all 50 states, plus US territories, possessions and Washington, DC.

The “06880” connection? Connecticut’s representative is Westport’s own Michael Bolton.

“The American Song Contest” starts tonight. Click here for more information, and to vote — hopefully for our neighbor. (Hat tip: Mark Mathias)

Screenshot from the “American Song Contest” website.

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For many years, this tree has captivated — and slightly concerned — Long Lots Road drivers.

It’s part of Westport’s natural beauty — and a great candidate for today’s “Westport … Naturally” feature.

(Photo/Tom Lowrie)

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And finally … we usually say, “Spring can’t come soon enough!” Yesterday it snuck in, a day earlier than normal. Whenever it arrives, we’re more than happy to greet it.

 

 

Remembering Jackie Heneage

Jacqueline Heneage — Westport’s 1st female 1st selectman — died October 3. She was 96 years old.

A former president of the League of Women Voters, her election over incumbent John Kemish in 1973 marked the first time a Democrat had won the top spot since 1948. She was 3 more times, serving until 1981.

Jackie Heneage, 1979

As noted in Woody Klein’s history of Westport, she hired a grantswoman who obtained nearly $2 million. It was used to convert Bedford Elementary School into Town Hall, and for open space acquisition, a youth center (now the Gillespie Center), elderly housing, the Police Department and beautification projects.

Heneage extended long-term projects like flood control, and sewers and road improvements. She believed the town had enough commercial zoning, and pushed for reduced building sites, increased setbacks and the elimination of Design Development Districts.

Westport’s school population declined sharply during her tenure. In addition to the Bedford Elementary School conversion,  Hillspoint Elementary School became a childcare center; Greens Farms Elementary became the Westport Arts Center, and Saugatuck Elementary on Bridge Street became elderly housing.

Heneage also oversaw the construction of the transfer station on the Sherwood Island Connector, extension of sewers on Post Road East and in many residential areas, and the move of fire station headquarters from Church Lane to its current Post Road location.

Jackie Heneage in 2002 with Ted Diamond. He served as her 2nd selectman.

She entered into long negotiations with Baron Walter Langer von Langendorff, who owned 32 acres of land on the Post Road East/Compo Road North corner. In 1979 the RTM voted to appropriate $3,48 million for the purchase, but postponed giving her condemnation authority if the baron refused to sell. After her administration, the land became Winslow Park.

Heneage also oversaw Westport’s participation in the nation’s bicentennial celebration in 1976. Over that July 4th weekend, Main Street between the Post Road and Elm Street turned from 2-way traffic to a 1-way street.

But Jackie Heneage was more than a groundbreaking first selectwoman. Her daughter Audrey sends along this remembrance.

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Our mother, Jackie Heneage was a dynamo. During our childhood she worked part-time, volunteered in many civic organizations, played tennis and still found time to put a hot meal on the table every night (despite not being a domestic
goddess)!

Saturday mornings we woke up to Broadway tunes or classical music blasting in the living room and our list of chores. It was always: clean your room and another space, plus mow one side of the lawn in summer. But after that we were
free to do whatever with whoever until dinner.

Summertimes we were shipped off to Beach School or Longshore every day for swim lessons and general tanning. This regimentation may have felt onerous to us, but it allowed my mom to continue being herself and not drown in family life.

There was no guilt on her part and no lasting damage to us kids. In fact, the structure was just what we needed.

Winter vacations meant a visit to our grandparents in Hanover, New Hampshire where she taught us all how to ski on her old equipment on the golf course behind her house, which had a rope tow in winter. She threw us into all the activities she had loved as a child. We were always outside riding bikes, skating, swatting at tennis balls. While only one of us became an athlete (Cynthia). the exposure was not a waste. She supported Cynthia in every sport she wanted to try — swimming, figure skating, skiing, gymnastics. She became proficient at all of them, although Mom finally told her she had to focus on one because she didn’t have time to drive her to the various practices.

Our mother planned fantastic trips and outings for our family. After Cynthia brought home several books on the national parks, she planned a 1-month trip out west. In summer 1966 we visited 7 different national parks and Mexico.

Jackie Heneage (seated) with her daughters.

The ’60s were the time of her increasing involvement in the Westport League of Women Voters, eventually becoming its president. The League’s study of town government prepared her for her first political campaign for a seat on the Zoning
Board of Appeals, and her later successful campaign for First Selectman.

As first selectman she was busy at work all day, and at town meetings every night. She took speechwriting very seriously and labored over each one, reading them aloud for our feedback.

On weekends, the police chief called her to report various disturbances around the town, many which her youngest daughter had attended (but never as a troublemaker)!

Her 8 years in office coincided with her parents needing increasing care in New Hampshire. Every holiday she and our father Peter traveled to give the caregivers their time off, never taking the holiday for themselves.

Jackie Heneage, reading the Westport News.

She retired from First Selectman in 1981 and went on to further corporate and government jobs. In 1983 she became a grandmother and doted on her grandchildren.

After her retirement in 1992 she and Peter delighted in taking them on excursions and extended trips, in between their own travels. She continued to play her favorite sport, tennis, until she was 80 years old. She was eventually blessed with 5 great-grandchildren she loved to see.

Peter and Jackie moved to Sedona, Arizona in 2018. Always active, Jackie made a friend who took her to meetings of the Sedona League of Women Voters and out to lunch. Jackie maintained her sense of humor and upbeat attitude to the end, becoming a favorite at Sedona Winds Assisted Living. But when she reached the age of 96, the age of Peter at his death, she decided it was time to check up on him, and off she went. We will miss her dearly

Candidates’ Voter Guide: 2021

Before every local election for years, Westport’s League of Women Voters distributed a Voters’ Guide. Filled with biographies of candidates for every office — and, more importantly, their responses to very direct questions about key issues — they helped many Westporters decide who to vote for.

Back in the day, nearly every Westporter got those guides through the Westport News. The paper is still printed, but the guide is not.

Fortunately, the LWV Voters’ Guide is now online.

So if you want to know where the candidates for selectmen; the Boards of Education, Finance and Assessment Appeals; Planning and Zoning Commission, and the Zoning Board of Appeals, plus all 9 RTM districts, stand — as well as where to vote, get absentee ballots, even how to register — click here.

It took a massive amount of work to prepare. It’s well worth taking the time to download. (NOTE: It is the only literature you’re allowed to bring into your polling site.)

And — on November 2 — don’t forget to vote!

Roundup: Flu Shots, Voters Guide, CLASP Concert, More


There is no COVID vaccine yet. But — uh oh — flu season is near. And the Westport Weston Health District is offering flu shots.

Clinics are set for Wednesday, October 21 (9:30 to 11:30 a.m.); Wednesday, October 28 (2 to 3 p.m.), and Monday November 16 (1 to 4 p.m.).

There are no walk-ins. All appointments must be scheduled in advanced. Click here for details.

The WWHD accepts Medicare, ConnectiCare, Cigna, Aetna and HUSKY insurance, as well as credit cards, checks and cash.

Questions? Call 203-227-9571, ext. 231.


For decades, voters have relied on the League of Women Voters’ Westport Voters’ Guide. It was delivered with the local newspaper.

It’s here now, and more available than ever: The Guide is online.

It’s packed with answers to policy questions by candidates for president, Congress and the state legislature.

There is also a map of polling places, sample ballots, and absentee ballot information.

Click here for this great resource. Questions for the LWV? Call 203-293-7687.


The Westport Weston Chamber of Commerce has sponsored a great — and welcome — series of outdoor concerts this year.

The last of the season is next Thursday (October 15, Imperial Avenue parking lot). Part of the Chamber’s support for people with special needs, it’s a safe, fun, family-friendly evening called “Flashback to the ’80s and ’90s.” Band Central will play — and the very entertaining group is donating their time.

The event is a benefit for CLASP Homes. For half a century they’ve created and supported family environments for people with autism and intellectual disabilities.

Tailgating begins at 4:30 p.m. The show kicks off at 6. Click here for tickets ($150 per car; 70 car limit in the lot).


And finally … it’s a weekend in mid-October. Time to go pumpkin picking!

 

LWV Offers ABCs On Election Ballots

If you’re confused about when and where to vote this November: You’re not alone.

COVID-19 — and a nationwide move toward mail ballots — make this election different for many Connecticut voters.

Westport’s League of Women Voters won’t tell you who to vote for. But they’re happy to tell you how.

First, there are 2 options. You can vote in person on Tuesday, November 3 (6 a.m. to 8 p.m.). Click here to find your polling place.

You can also vote by mail. Every registered voter will receive (by mail) an application to request an absentee ballot. They’ll be sent within the first 2 weeks of September. If you don’t want to wait, click here to request an absentee ballot.

Fill out the absentee ballot application, then mail it ASAP to Town Clerk, c/o Town Hall, 110 Myrtle Avenue, Westport, CT 06880. Alternatively, you can put it in the official Connecticut drop box behind Town Hall (see photo below).

The Town Clerk’s office will mail out absentee ballots beginning October 2. Or you can make an appointment with the office to receive your ballot in person; call 203-341-1110.

Fill out your ballot, then mail it ASAP to Town Clerk, c/o Town Hall, 110 Myrtle Avenue, Westport, CT 06880. Alternatively, you can put it in the official Connecticut drop box behind Town Hall (see photo above).

The ballot must be returned to the Town Clerk’s office no later than 8 p.m. on Election Day (November 3). The drop box behind Town Hall will be open until 8 p.m. that day.

If you mail your absentee ballot via the US Postal Service, or deposited it in the drop box, you can click here to track it.  If the ballot was not received, contact the town clerk (tclerk@westportct.gov; 203-341-1110).

Of course, none of that can happen unless you’re registered to vote. Click here to learn how.

(For the Town Clerk’s web page — with even more details on voting — click here. For more information on Westport’s League of Women Voters, click here. You can follow them on Instagram [@lwvwestport] and Facebook [Westport League of Women Voters. Hat tip: Nicole Klein)

 

Election Day Is November 6. Here’s What You Need To Know.

Westport’s League of Women Voters has been — as usual — hard at work preparing for Election Day. (It’s a week from Tuesday: November 6.)

For one thing, they’re sponsoring a debate tomorrow (Monday, October 29, 7 to 9 p.m., Town Hall auditorium), for the state legislature candidates in the districts that include Westport.

In the State Senate, that’s Toni Boucher and Will Haskell (District 26), and Tony Hwang and Michelle McCabe (District 28).

State Legislature candidates include Jonathan Steinberg and Greg Kraut (District 136), and Stephanie Thomas and Gail Lavielle (District 143).

The debate will be televised on Public Access Channel 79 and Frontier Channel 6020.

In addition, the LWV has published its very comprehensive Voters’ Guide. It’s the only material that can be brought into the polls during voting. Click here to see it; click here for a printable PDF version.

The LWV also reminds Connecticut residents that the deadline to register to vote is this Tuesday (October 30). That includes name or address changes to existing registrations. Click here for more information.

Election day registration is available for new voter registration at Westport Town Hall on Election Day, starting at 6 a.m.

Need to check your polling place? Click here.

LWV Wants Your Candidate Debate Questions

With Connecticut teetering on the brink of financial disaster — and education, housing, transportation and infrastructure issues clamoring for attention too — the stakes are high in next month’s election.

So besides sponsoring their usual candidates’ debate, Westport’s League of Women Voters is taking one more step to ensure citizen involvement.

The October 29 event (7 p.m., Town Hall auditorium) will include questions from community members — and they can be emailed ahead of time.

To ask State Senate candidates Toni Boucher, Will Haskell, Tony Hwang and Michelle McCabe, and House hopefuls Gail Lavielle, Stephanie Thomas, Greg Kraut and Jonathan Steinberg anything, email LWVWestportct.org.

Screeners — 1 Republican, 1 Democrat and 1 unaffiliated League member — will ensure that all questions are nonpartisan.

Can’t be there? The debate will be televised live on Cablevision Channel 79 and Frontier channel 90, and posted thereafter on the town website.

Whether you ask questions, attend the debate or miss it complete, don’t forget to vote! Election Day is November 6.

(The League of Women Voters is co-sponsoring this debate, with the Westport PTA Council.)

Maker Faire Adds Governor Candidates

On Saturday, downtown Westport will teem with more than 12,000 Maker Faire-goers. Intrepid, curious, creative and resourceful, they’ll listen, ask questions and learn all about technology, arts and crafts, food, robotics, art, transportation and a whole lot more.

Curiosity is also a hallmark of the electoral process. Already, 31 people have filed to run for governor of Connecticut this fall. That’s a huge number — and it mirrors interest across the country in the upcoming midterm elections.

Eighteen of those candidates will be at the Maker Faire. From 12:30 to 2 p.m. at Town Hall, they’ll share their visions and dreams for the state. The Gubernatorial Forum is sponsored by Westport’s League of Women Voters, in conjunction with Maker Faire.

Hopefuls include Democrats, Republicans, independents and unaffiliateds. They come from all across Connecticut.

Two of the 31 candidates are from Westport. Marisa Manly (unaffiliated) will have the shortest trip of anyone. Republican Steve Obsitnik could also have walked there, but has a conflict and can’t make it.

The forum is free, and open to the public.

Every year, Westport’s Maker Faire gets bigger. This year it reaches all the way to the governor’s mansion.