Tag Archives: Winslow Park

Roundup: Parks & Rec Rules; Drive-In Movies; Assumption Food Drive; More


New Parks and Recreation rules!

As of today (June 13), doubles play will be allowed at the tennis courts at Longshore, Staples High School, Town Farm and Doubleday (behind Saugatuck Elementary School).

Also as of today, dogs will no longer be required to be on leash in the off-leash area of Winslow Park or other town property where dogs are allowed.

As of Wednesday (June 17), one pickleball court at Compo Beach will be open for singles play with restrictions.  It’s first come, first serve.

Also as of Wednesday, both platform tennis courts at Longshore will be open for singles play with restrictions.  Advanced reservations are required, and can be booked online 5 days in advance, or by calling the Longshore tennis office at 203-341-1180 2 days in advance. No walk-ups allowed!

Registration for Parks and Rec and Wakeman Town Farm summer programs begins Wednesday. To see programs and register, click here,


And in more Parks & Rec news: The Compo Beach bathrooms are open. They bear these signs:

(Photo/Andrea Cross)


Coming attraction: Movies in the Imperial Avenue parking lot.

A “drive-in theater” will be set up there this summer. The Remarkable Theater — the initiative employing men and women with disabilities — is behind the project, which got a unanimous go-ahead from the Board of Selectmen.

Four films will be shown on a 40-foot-wide screen over 2 weeks at the end of June, said Remarkable creative director Doug Tirola. Up to 80 cars can be accommodated in the lot, which during the day is both a commuter parking lot and the site of Thursday Farmers’ Markets.

Film titles and more details will be announced soon.

 


A pair of Norwalk food pantries — St. Philip’s and St. Vincent de Paul — feed 350 families a week. Both the families and the pantries are in desperate need of help.

Tomorrow (Sunday, June 14, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.), the Knights of Columbus will conduct a “drive-through food drive.” The site is the Assumption Church parking lot (98 Riverside Avenue).

You don’t have to leave your vehicle. K of C members will pick up your donation from your trunk or back seat.

Food that is needed:

  • Small bags of rice
  • Small packets of pasta/macaroni
  • Pasta sauce
  • Bags of dried black beans
  • Canned fruit
  • Canned vegetables
  • Peanut butter
  • Jelly
  • Vienna sausage – regular or chicken
  • Cereal – oatmeal or cornflakes
  • Powered milk
  • Coffee

Checks are great too. Make them payable to Church of the Assumption; in the memo line, write “Food Drive.”

Assumption Church (Photo/Ellen Wentworth)


Staples High School and University of Southern California journalism student Becca Rawiszer recently interviewed Board of Education chair Candice Savin about where Westport schools go from here. Click here to download the Persona Interviews app to watch the full interview — and ask Savin a follow up question.

Screenshot from the Candice Savin interview.


And finally … like Tacocat, we can dream, right?

Winslow Park Plea: Dirt Bikers, Clean Up After Yourselves!

Deb Howland-Murray calls herself “a portrait artist who benefited tremendously from growing up in Westport’s artistic environment. After a sojourn for college and adventures, I returned to Westport. I have lived here for the past 35 years.” 

She writes:

Each spring people pour out of their houses and into nature, shedding months of cold the way a snake sheds its skin.

This year brings new significance to this outdoor migration: a heightened longing for beauty and distraction in the spring of COVID-19.

Maybe that’s why so many people flock to Winslow Park. They come not only to walk dogs, but to enjoy its 28 acres of sunny fields and dense woods. They are parents with children riding scooters and bikes, joggers, couples sitting in conversation on the park’s benches, and teenagers anxious to try their skills on the dirt bike jumps in one of the forested, trail-laced sections of the park.

The Winslow Park dirt bike course. (Photo/Deb Howland-Murray)

Winslow is a treasure. Now more than ever, it’s a breath of fresh air literally and figuratively. I’ve watched it come to life this spring, delighted in April’s little purple flowers, the massive trees leafing out in May, the fields that now read yellow with buttercups.

These are such a sharp contrast to the trash, broken glass and empty vape boxes carpeting the dirt bike section of the park.

Vape boxes litter the dirt bike area. (Photo/Deb Howland-Murray)

I like to watch the teenagers barreling down the course’s steep hill and becoming airborne on the ascent. But it saddens me that the fun is coupled with such disrespect for the surrounding environment, one that’s dotted with wonderful examples of human creativity as well as natural beauty.

The dirt bike course was created by enterprising teenagers, and adjacent to it there is a remarkable lean-to someone made from large branches. Next to the lean-to, a picnic table waits invitingly in the shade. I’ve seen people meditating there.

But who would want to stop there now? Who could bring their small children to play among the empty cans and vape boxes? Which paw will be the first to be sliced by glass shards? When will an unknowing puppy be drawn to the scent of food on a snack wrapper and make the unfortunate mistake of swallowing it?

Trash left on tables. The lean-to is in the back. (Photo/Deb Howland-Murray)

Don’t get me wrong. I love teenagers; I raised 5 of them. An avid skier and hunter-jumper rider, I’m all for the excitement of speed and the joy of flying through the air. I want the kids to have fun in the park. They seem like good kids, wearing their helmets and respectfully keeping a physical distance when they meet others on the trails. They’re polite.

I’m happy that they have a safe, outdoor place to congregate in small numbers at such a difficult and disappointing time to be a teenager. And I’m not interested in passing judgment on what they might or might not be drinking or smoking. That’s up to their parents.

But speaking directly to you, young people: Nature is not your trash can. The park is there for all to enjoy. Now especially, we need to add what we can to each other’s enjoyment.

The Winslow Park lean-to. (Photo/Tracy Porosoff)

Please, kiddos: Create whatever mess you want in your rooms – I certainly did. Just bring a bag with you to the park, collect your garbage and drop it in the trash cans when you exit.

We dog owners do the same. Believe me, collecting your garbage is not nearly as gross as what we are collecting and ferrying to those cans! But what if we didn’t? What if the area you enjoy was full of the kind of waste no one wants to step in?

So, c’mon. Litter-ally, place your drop in the massive bucket of consideration we need right now. It’s not too much to ask.

Pics Of The Day #1113

Longshore Club Park … (Photo/Kathie Motes Bennewitz)

… and Winslow Park (Wendy Crowther)

Weekend In Westport: Pandemic Edition

Spring is here. And here’s what Westporters saw this weekend:

As always, the Minute Man saves Westport. (Photo/Bruce Becker)

The Senior Center is closed — but open for beauty. (Photo/Molly Alger)

As he did in life, Cameron Bruce provides a ray of sunshine. His garden is at the corner of Old Hill Farms and Winding Lane. (Photo/AnneMarie Breschard)

Walking — carefully apart — on Canal Road. (Photo/Gene Borio)

Park Lane (Photo/Molly Alger)

Baron’s South (Photo/Molly Alger)

Sue Terrace (Photo/Molly Alger)

Saugatuck Shores (Photo/Gene Borio)

Waiting to meet, properly socially distanced at Winslow Park. (Photo/Dan Woog)

COVID-19 Roundup: Winslow Park Rules; Virtual Bingo Helps Non-Profits; Keep Your Distance!; Restaurant, Retail News; More

As of yesterday, there were 89 positive cases of COVID-19 in Westport — the smallest daily increase here since the spread was first reported. Norwalk has passed Westport for the most cases in Connecticut (105).

Social distancing appears to be working. Governor Lamont emphasized that again, restricting all social and recreational gatherings to no more than 5 people.

The Parks and Recreation Department institutes these rules at Winslow Park:

  • No off leash areas. All dogs must be kept on leash.
  • Pets must be kept close to the handler.
  • The 6-foot physical distancing protocol is to be followed for people and pets. 

These protocols should be followed everywhere in town, including Longshore. Park.


Reader Stan Witkow reports that a group of Westporters has started a virtual bingo night every Thursday. The winner chooses a non-profit to get the buy-in pot. This week’s beneficiary is Westport EMS.

Over 20 people played last week, from as far as Florida and California. Most met 20 years ago at New Neighbors, Temple Israel and parents’ night at Bedford Middle School.

Even more signed up for this Thursday. Bingo!


A reader writes:

My wife and I walk on our sidewalks and roads. We’re mindful of the 6-foot distancing recommendation, so we’re distressed to encounter people who seem oblivious or apathetic. Young folks seem most careless, though some are mindful. Some older folks are careless too.

Yesterday, a young man running and breathing heavily came up from behind and nearly brushed my shoulder. That single encounter could easily have spread the virus. Unfortunately it was not our only close call.

A reminder: The virus is in the community. We all must avoid spreading it.

Be careful out there!


Nefaire, JoyRide and Haus of Pretty have teamed up on a “self-care bundle.” It  includes a facial, cycling class and blowout.

15% of proceeds go to retail employees across the 3 businesses: estheticians, therapists, cycling instructors, front desk hourly staff and hair stylists.

The bundle can be purchased at www.westportisstrong.com.


In restaurant news, Bartaco is donating 100% of all gift card sales to an employee fund.

And although Bobby Q’s moved from Westport to Norwalk, its heart is still here. They always contribute generously to town causes, like Christ & Holy Trinity Preschool. A reminder: Their smoker is open now, with curbside and delivery service.


Last month, “06880” profiled Ben Saxon. The bright, creative Staples High School 9th grader had just launched a math, robotics and coding tutoring service  for 6- to 14-year-olds.

Schools closed, but Ben hasn’t. He now offers weekly LEGO building, Kano Star Wars programming and Makeblock robotics courses, for 2-3 students each. They’re 1 hour a day, 5 days long, starting on Mondays, all via Zoom Video Conferencing. For details, click here.


The Berniker family has had a tough time during this crisis. Jen is now recovered from a bout with COVID-19. Her husband Eric is at home after an encouraging chest X-ray.

The other day, Jen Berniker interviewed her 6-year-old son Max about the ups and downs of family isolation.

That’s today’s Persona interview (below). Download the Persona mobile app to share your own stories, by interviewing family members and answering questions we’ll be sending around. Tag “6880 Dan Woog” in the interviewee field.


Finally, this has absolutely nothing to do with COVID-19. But it has everything to do with the idea that everything we do matters. Bruce Springsteen took a chance and invited a kid onstage. Look what happened next. So cool!

 

Pic Of The Day #1057

Monkey in a Winslow Park tree (Photo/Tracy Porosoff)

Photo Challenge #262

Seems like there are a lot of wrought iron fences in town.

One surrounds Christ & Holy Trinity Episcopal Church. Another sits outside “Fort Apache” — the medical center on Kings Highway North,near Wilton Road.

Neither of those fences was last week’s Photo Challenge, though. Amy Schneider captured the one at Winslow Park. It was built for a previous use of the rolling land bordered by North Compo and the Post Road: originally handsome estate for Henry Richard and his wife Mary Fitch Winslow (click here for that amazing back story), then part of the mysterious and spooky Westport Sanitarium (click here).

The first person to correctly recognize that fence was Fred Cantor — though he qualified “Winslow Park?” with a question mark.

We see that fence all the time, stuck at that Post Road/Compo traffic light. Next time, look a bit more closely.

It’s beautiful.

Today’s Photo Challenge is a cornerstone. No one is alive today who remembers it being laid — but it was an important one. Click “Comments” below if you know where it is.

(Photo/Dan Woog)

Photo Challenge #260

Last week’s Photo Challenge — showing what looked like a valve — drew this in-depth comment/possibly tongue-in-cheek explanation from John Terpening:

Spillway gate valve for Nash’s Pond overflow protection. You can see by the reverse thread (counterclockwise arrow) that it also acts as a survey marker for determining when Westport was founded in 1681. By the fact that it was stamped into the valve three times it relates to the number two (also stamped) that most second graders have to be told something three times in order to retained it. The valve is located on the east end of the dam in order to avoid large waves as the prevailing winds are from the west.

Interesting– but wrong.

The image can be seen at Winslow Park. It is — according to the photographer, Jay Dirnberger — the “last remaining structure from the sanitarium” at the property on the Post Road, at North Compo.

No one correctly identified the photo (click here to see). No wonder: We’re too busy chasing our dogs (or chatting with friends) at the park to look down and notice. And the sanitarium is long gone. But what a building it was!

Here’s another magnificent building. If you know where in Westport you’d see it, click “Comments” below.

(Photo/Amy Schneider)

Pics Of The Day #926

Witches’ house at Winslow Park? (Photo/Tracy Porosoff)

Meanwhile, there was a special guest player at last weekend’s Challenger Little League game. (Photo/Beth Cody)

Pic Of The Day #924

Winslow Park (Photo/Tracy Porosoff)