Tag Archives: Seth Schachter

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 16 Gallery

A few 4th of July-themed works are featured in this week’s art gallery.

“06880” is finishing our 4th month featuring readers’ creations. As the world changes, your submissions are as important as ever.

Keep ’em coming. Professional, amateur, old, young — we want it all. Student works are particularly welcome!

The only rule: Your art must be inspired by, reflective of, or otherwise related to the times we’re going through. Email dwoog@optonline.net.

“Happy 4th of July!” (Amy Schneider)

“Welcome Back” (Lawrence Weisman)

Seth Schachter created this collage from discarded items he spotted, in and around downtown. “It’s sad to see litter like this (or any litter for that matter),” he says.”But of course it’s reflective of the times we live in.”

“Out for a Drive in the New Norm!” Bob Weingarten says, “While cleaning drawers, I found cars and figures that our grandkids used.” One result is this photograph.

“First Recital” (oil on canvas). Artist Cindy Wagner says, “I just watched my granddaughter perform a virtual dance recital. It’s still beautiful and made me smile, but I thought about how different it was from her past recitals.”

“The Golden Rule” (Mark Yurkiw)

Untitled. Larry Untermeyer shot this tight closeup of the pistils from within a single bloom of a wild tiger lily that grows on his patio.

Photo Challenge #121

Some of our photo challenges are easy. Some are hard.

But I don’t think I’ve ever posted one where a number of people get the right answer — but even more guess the same wrong answer.

Last week’s photo showed a picnic bench near some water. It could very well have been taken from the top of Burying Hill, looking out at Long Island Sound below.

Seven people thought it was.

But Seth Schachter actually shot the image at ground level. The bench was at Sherwood Mill Pond Preserve — the former site of Allen’s Clam House, now a wonderful, peaceful spot with tons of native grasses and plants. (Click here for the photo, and all the other wrong guesses.)

Chris Swan was the first person to answer (and he nailed it). Good thing, too — he’s been a member of the Sherwood Mill Pond Advisory Committee since its inception in 2005. (Plus, he grew up — and still lives — nearby.)

Kudos too to Matt Murray (another neighbor), Joyce Barnhart, Golda Villa, Kimberly Englander Leonard and Rebecca Wolin. I’m sure they all enjoy the preserve’s quiet beauty.

Now you can too. But ssshhh — don’t tell anyone!

This week’s photo challenge also includes a bit of water. Click “Comments” below if you know where it is.

Oh My 06880 — Photo Challenge #82

Okay, I know: Last week’s photo challenge was too easy.

It took Julie Fatherley all of 6 minutes to note that the mannequin dressed in Army fatigues can be found outside the Liberty Army & Navy store. She was followed in rapid succession by Edward Bloch, Leslie Wolf, Matt Murray, Anthony Palmer, Rebecca Wolin, Fred Rubin, Susan Schmidt and Erik Østbye.

Congratulations to all. Sorry if it was too simple. (Click here to see the photo.)

This week’s challenge — courtesy of Patricia McMahon — is very, very cool. Click “Comments” if you know where this photo (from 2 nights ago) was taken.

Oh My 06880 -- July 24, 2016

(Photo/Patricia McMahon)

 

Oh My 06880 — Photo Challenge #75

Westport has more tunnels than anyone realizes.

Some are well-known. Others are obscure. A few are hidden in plain sight.

Among the last group is the Saugatuck River passage at the back of Parker Harding Plaza. It’s on the right (east) side of Gorham Island as you paddle upriver. (It’s not always navigable. Check the tides!)

Richard Stein was the only “06880” reader to nail last week’s photo challenge. He’s good!

Incorrect guesses for Seth Schachter’s image included the nearby Ruth Steinkraus Cohen bridge (where the flags fly); Post Road West to Nash’s Pond; Sherwood Mill Pond to Sherwood Island; Sasco Creek to Southport Beach, and 2 pedestrian tunnels (some readers thought the water came from floods); Main Street to Parker Harding Plaza (transformed last year by Miggs Burroughs’ lenticular photos), and the Saugatuck train station. To see last week’s photo and all the guesses, click here

It’s on to this week’s challenge. As always, click “Comments” if you think you know where in Westport you’d see this:

Oh My 06880 - June 5, 2016

I-95 Graffiti: The Sequel

Yesterday, “06880” posted photos of a less-than-stellar job the state did removing graffiti from the Sasco Creek Bridge over I-95.

Not far away, there’s some more they completely missed.

Alert reader Seth Schachter says that this handiwork has been up for several months, at the I-95 Maple Lane underpass:

Maple Lane - Seth Schachter

So, readers, which is worse: This stuff, or the paint job on Sasco Creek?

Greens Farms Tavern?!

Alert “06880” reader Seth Schachter spotted this token for sale the other day, on eBay:

Greens Farms Tavern collage

It was listed by someone in South Carolina, and sold for $25.

What’s much more interesting up here in “06880” is this:

  • What was the Greens Farms Tavern? And where, in when?
  • Who is “EJT”?
  • What are these tokens for, and what would 5 of them get in trade?

If you know anything about the tavern — or the tokens — click “Comments.” The most complete answer wins a free drink, courtesy of “06880.”

Redeemable only at the Greens Farms Tavern.

A Tale Of One Library Book

The Westport Library can be a noisy place.

But it does many things well. And some of those things are done very, very quietly.

The 1st book Seth Schachter checked out — and read with his son — was “Mister Doctor.” It’s a wonderful story about a remarkable man, during one of history’s darkest periods.

Seth learned that the subject of the story — Janusz Korczak — had written a Harry Potter-like book, “Kaytek the Wizard.” He wanted to check it out for his 9-year-old son. But the library did not own it.

Westport Library logoSeth offered to purchase it for them. The librarian said no. Instead, she asked Seth to write down details about the book, and add his own contact info.

A few days later, the library emailed Seth. The book was on hold.

They’d purchased the book. They already received it, cataloged it, and reserved it for him.

It’s a little thing, sure.

But the library didn’t have to do it. They didn’t have to go the extra mile.

That they did — and did it so graciously, quickly and quietly — says a lot about the Westport Library, and everyone who works there.

You might say: It speaks volumes.

Kaytek the Wizard

That Didn’t Take Long…

Last Friday, “06880” erroneously reported that Bertucci’s will close on Wednesday.

My bad. The restaurant actually shut its doors yesterday.

This morning, the sign was already down…

Bertucci's sign - 1 - Seth Schachter

…and headed to that great restaurant recycling bin in the sky.

Photos and hat tip: alert "06880" reader Seth Schachter.

Photos and hat tip: alert “06880” reader Seth Schachter.

Greens Farms Post Office: Back In The Day

Our recent story about the sign on the Greens Farms post office spurred alert “06880” reader Seth Schachter to action. He sent along this photo he found on eBay, from decades ago:

Greens Farms PO - 1950s

Seth says it’s from the 1950s. He’s probably right. The sign above the windows — while similar to the current one — does not include a zip code. They were introduced in 1963.

Greens Farms School, Back In The Day

This morning’s post about Westport’s constantly changing school landscape inspired alert reader Seth Schachter to go his archives.

He’s lived here only 4 years, but he’s got a great sense of history. Seth writes:

This post card is from the early 1900’s. From what I was told, the school was in the same location as today’s Greens Farms Elementary School. It is my guess and understanding that the oldest section of today’s GFS (referred to on the inside as “the fountain area”) is probably this post card image.

Early Greens Farms School

Is this in fact the current site of Greens Farms Elementary School? If readers have any information on this original building, please click “Comments” below.