Tag Archives: Lawrence Weisman

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 62 Gallery

Happy Memorial Day weekend!

Westport celebrates with its 48th annual Fine Arts Festival. It’s been moved from the traditional bake-on-the-asphalt-in-mid-July date to a more artist-and-art-lover-friendly late May slot.

Main Street is the place to go, to see fantastic works of all types and styles. It’s today and tomorrow — Saturday and Sunday — from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Click here for more details.

To get you in the mood, enjoy “06880”‘s own tradition: our weekly art gallery. Like the downtown one, it’s free!

Remember: This is your gallery. We rely on your submissions.

Some of you are professionals; most are amateurs. Experience does not matter. We want all your art!

Student submissions are especially welcome. So are artists who have not submitted previously. Email dwoog@optonline.net, to share your work with the world.

“On the Way to the Beach” (Lawrence Weisman)

“Peony” (Amy Schneider)

“Amelie.” Elizabeth Hiltz painted her daughter. The artist says: “The time not commuting has allowed me to focus again on my painting. It has taken a new turn though, and now I’m enjoying exploring the portrait as I never have before. I love diving in, in a way which also makes the subject’s heart sing — surrounded by their fondest things in life. A shift in one’s mindset during COVID, and a literal reminder of what’s important in life.”

“Earthplace” (Rowene Weems Photography)

“Just Because” (Ellen Wentworth)

“Healing Waters” (Kathryn O’Reardon)

“Tonight’s Moon” (Karen Weingarten)

“Walking at My Brother’s 2007 Graduation” — mixed media paint. Artist Michael Beaudoin — Staples High School Class of 2021, asks: “Will he be able to walk with me at mine?”

“A Study in Beauty” (Larry Untermeyer)

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 61 Gallery

After 60 weeks, we’ve turned a corner.

Only 2 this week’s art submissions refer specifically to the pandemic.

This feature began as a way for reader/artists to express their feelings — about COVID, the quarantine, the political climate, you name — through their favorite medium.

Now it’s evolved. The works we feature are more wide ranging. They’re a bit more nuanced. Just one more sign that the world is moving on.

As always: This is your gallery. Some of you are professionals; most are amateurs. Experience does not matter. We want all your art!

Student submissions are especially welcome. So are artists who have not submitted previously. Email dwoog@optonline.net, to share your work with the world.

“Mask Quilt” (Amy Schneider)

“Garden Gate” (Lucy Johnson)

“Happy Gatsby Day: The Fitzgeralds” (Brian Whelan)

“Taken from Inside Rive Bistro” (Ellen Wentworth)

“Man With Glasses,” Carina Bockhaus, age 10

“Valtameri Shell,” Allegra Bockhaus, age 13

“Looking Up” (Karen Weingarten)

“To Mask or Not to Mask” (Ellin Spadone)

“Prague” (Lawrence Weisman)

“Palladian Vista” (Fred Cantor)

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 60 Gallery

Spring keeps hanging on in Westport.

And our talented “06880” artists keep painting and photographing it.

This week’s art gallery shimmers with the splendors of the season. Here’s our latest selection of reader/artist works.

Some of you are professionals; most are amateurs. Experience does not matter. We want all your art!

Student submissions are especially welcome. So are artists who have not submitted previously. Email dwoog@optonline.net, to share your work with the world.

“May the Bird of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose” (John Gould)

“Inside a Rainbow of Hope” (Amy Schneider)

“Kenzie.” Artist Beth Berkowitz says: “I had not painted or drawn since high school, when I decided I didn’t want to study art for a career, and have it become a chore with deadlines.
I thought I would work in a ‘real job,’ then always have my art to relax with. However, life took off and I never found the time. Now I’m making the time, and find it soothing and therapeutic.”

“Close-Up” (Lucy Johnson)

“Trees at Earthplace (Rowene Weems)

“More Beauty” (Lauri Weiser)

“Your Shot Matters a Lot!” (Ellin Spadone)

“My Lilacs” (Karen Weingarten)

“Spring Plein Air Painting” (Werner Liepolt)

“A Study in Beauty” (Larry Untermeyer)

“Provincetown Sunset” (Lawrence Weisman)

 

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 59 Gallery

And the colors keep coming!

Enjoy this week’s art gallery. If you’re an artist of any kind, you can help us present our next one.

Each week we present a new gallery of “06880” reader/artist works. Some of you are professionals; most are amateurs. Experience does not matter. We want all your art!

Student submissions are especially welcome. So are artists who have not submitted previously.

Email dwoog@optonline.net, to share your work with the world.

Today Is National Dog Mom’s Day. These are Amy Schneider’s 2 cockapoo “sons”: 3-year-old Ripley, and 9-week-old Bosco. (Amy Schneider)

Untitled — at Parker Harding Plaza (Susan Iseman)

“A Gift of Spring” — oil on canvas (Ellin Spadone)

“Car Wash Splash” (Karen Weingarten)

“They Don’t Build ‘Em Like This Anymore (Lawrence Weisman)

“Gig in the Garden” (Brian Whelan)

“View From the Family Room This Glorious Spring Day” (June Whittaker)

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 58 Gallery

Amy Schneider leads this week’s art gallery, with a May Day submission.

That sets the tone for much of the rest of the work. It’s been a beautiful season, and “06880” artists capture it beautifully.

Each week — no matter what the weather — we feature whatever suits your mood. Some of you are professionals; most are amateurs. Experience does not matter. We want all your art!

Student submissions are especially welcome. So are artists who have not submitted previously.

Email dwoog@optonline.net, to share your work with the world.

“Happy May Day” (Amy Schneider)

“When Do I Get My Shot?” (Ellin Spadone)

“Gig in the Garden” (Brian Whelan)

“Spray of Flowers” (Lucy Johnson)

“The Door to the Other Side” — Hillandale Road (Karen Weingarten)

Untitled (Lawrence Weisman)

“The Lightness of Being, Wakeman Place” (Tom Kretsch)

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 56 Gallery

Once again, our “06880” art gallery welcomes a new young artist.

12-year-old Luke Bernier created a unique character on his Wacom pen tablet. He joins nearly a dozen other contributors, whose works range from watercolor and Japanese ink to photography (both still and in motion).

That’s the whole idea of “0*6*Art*Art*0.” Each week, we feature whatever form suits your mood. Some of you are professionals; most are amateurs. Experience does not matter. We want it all!

Student submissions are especially welcome. So are artists who have not submitted previously.

Email dwoog@optonline.net, to share your work with the world.

“Blowing in the Wind” (GIF by Karen Weingarten)

“King McHucklechucks” (Luke Bernier, 6th grade)

“A Rose is a Rose …” (Lucy Johnson)

“Daydreaming #1” (Martin Howard)

“Touches of Spring on a Misty Morning (Southport)” (Tom Kretsch)

“Beach Horse” (Pam Kesselman)

“Panda and Child” Sumi-e wok: painting on Japanese handmade paper, with ground Japanese ink (Costanza Baiocco)

“Are We There Yet?” (Ellin Spadone)

“Public Personas” — on view at Westport River Gallery (Brian Whelan)

“New England Coast” (Lawrence Weisman)

“Daffodils in Our Backyard” collage (Amy Schneider)

 

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 55 Gallery

This week’s art gallery opens with a new artist.

Evan Sealove — age 10 — moved to Westport with his family in August. During COVID, he discovered Bob Ross’ videos. Evan decided to try painting on his own. His mother Joselyn got supplies at Michaels. He got to work. The result is impressive.

We welcome Evan — and, as we do each week, we welcome whatever art form suits your mood. You don’t have to be a pro, or even experienced. Send it all!

Student submissions are especially welcome. So are artists who have not submitted previously. Email dwoog@optonline.net, to share your work with the world.

“Happy Little Mountains” (Evan Sealove)

“Fairy Tale Plant” watercolor (Ellin Spadone)

“Nature’s Beauty” (Lauri Weiser)

“Spring is Here” oil pastels on sketch pad (Jennifer Skarupa)

Untitled (Karen Weingarten)

“Be the Sun!” (Pam Kesselman)

Untitled (Marybeth Woods)

“The Garden Door” (Lucy Johnson)

Feathers float down and
stick on weathered jetty rocks. 
Pull before they curl. (Amy Schneider)

“Mykonos” (Lawrence Weisman)

“Acacia” rice paper with mineral watercolors (Costanza Baiocco)

 

 

 

 

 

 

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 53 Gallery

We begin our 2nd year of the Saturday art gallery with plenty of color (and a couple of watercolors). And, of course, a few other surprises.

Spring is on the way. Enjoy our artists’ interpretation of it.

Each week, we welcome whatever art form suits your mood. You don’t have to be a pro, or even experienced. Send it all!

Student submissions of all ages are especially welcome. So are artists who have not submitted before.

Email dwoog@optonline.net, to share your work with the world.

“Masked COVID Portrait” (Dereje Tarrant, age 14)

“Palm Sunday (Christ Entering Jerusalem)” (Brian Whelan). Tomorrow is Palm Sunday. This work is on view at the Westport River Gallery.

“Small Miracle” watercolor (Ellin Spadone)

“Looking Forward to Traveling Safely Again” (Amy Schneider)

“Horsing Around” (Lawrence Weisman)

Untitled watercolor (Lucy Johnson)

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 52 Gallery

Ta-da! We did it!

Today, “06880” celebrates one full year of our Saturday morning art gallery.

In those first frightening days of the pandemic, I put out the call: Create art. Then send it in. A welcome tradition was born.

It was a way for artists and photographers to work through so many jumbled emotions. It was a way too for readers around the world to appreciate our artists, without the galleries and shows they always relied on.

In the beginning, work was entirely COVID-related. Oils, lithographs, sketches, photos, crafts — they showed masks, isolation, hearts. They evoked fear, uncertainty, hope.

Over time, other themes emerged. The summer’s Black Lives Movement sparked a new type of art — and a familiar welter of mixed emotions.

Gradually, our gallery changed. Nature emerged. Traditional scenes reappeared. Whimsy popped up.

Coincidentally, 12 artists contributed works to this week’s anniversary gallery. That’s one for every month we’ve endured.

There is light at the end of the tunnel. Let’s hope it’s not an onrushing train.

Meanwhile, our “06880” art gallery will continue. As always, we welcome whatever form suits your mood. You don’t have to be a pro, or even experienced. Send it all!

Student submissions of all ages are especially welcome. So are artists who have not submitted before.

Email dwoog@optonline.net, to share your work with the world.

“Spring Has Sprung” (Amy Schneider0

“I See the Light at the End of the Storm” (Ellen Wentworth)

“St. Patrick and the Wolfhounds” (Brian Whelan)

Untitled (Werner Liepolt)

“Crocuses, Bee and Shadow” (Elena Nasereddin)

“Betrothed in the Time of COVID” (Diane Yormark)

“Done! Who’s Pouring?” (Patricia Duesy)

“Rites of Spring” (Ellin Spadone)

Lithograph artist Ann Chernow says, “If you wear a mask even if you are vaccinated, you’ll have ‘Sweet Dreams, Baby’!”

Untitled (Pam Kesselman)

“Wash Day” (Lawrence Weisman)

“Sunset” (Karen Weingarten)

 

[OPINIONS] Cons, Pros Of State “Multi-Housing” Bill

Westport Weston Chamber of Commerce executive director and RTM member Matthew Mandell sends regular emails to a large list. He addresses a variety of local topics.

The other day he weighed in on State Senate Bill 1024, concerning multi-family housing. He wrote:

More than one bill being proposed in Hartford would usurp local zoning laws and single family zoning, and allow as of right multi-family housing.

One would mandate this change 1/2 mile around any train station, as well as 1/4 mile from a commercial zone.

Another would allow duplexes (2-family homes) in any single family zone.

The former, which I will focus on, would include both Saugatuck and Greens Farms areas, the swaths along Riverside Avenue and all along the Post Road. We are talking hundreds if not thousands of properties.

The Westport train station has long been the center of multi-use developments.

The term “as of right” means free to do it essentially without Planning & Zoning  approval. Any developer could come in and build 4 condo units on any property they wanted, regardless of our rules, and the concerns or living choices of the neighbors.

There is a need for affordable housing, no argument, and social inequities exist in our state. The cause of much of this is being laid, by the proponents of these measures, at the door step of our towns and more than often those towns in Fairfield County. Past zoning rules, now outlawed, fostered exclusionary practices and this, they say, still needs to be rectified. More importantly, they also say current zoning decisions still do this.

So in order to set things straight, all towns across the state would have to accept this responsibility and must allow this unfettered development.

Many legislators, senators and representatives, want to be doing the right thing. So do most of us. Being on the right side of history, by creating more affordable housing and correcting social injustices, is for the most part a no-brainer. It’s right.

But many of them yearning to help have and are being persuaded that this specific legislation is the right way to do it. It is not. It’s like many things that start with the best of intentions, if not vetted thoroughly, and yes challenged, have significant and unintended consequences

The proponents believe that legislating by fiat and across the board densification will solve the problem. Yet there is no proof offered that any of this housing would be affordable or that a great diversity of individuals would be benefited. It is a theory, it seems, without verified merit and a myopic view of how planning works.

For years, Canal Park has offered affordable housing for seniors, near downtown.

What is most bothersome to me is that this would be done without regard to how this would affect those that currently live in these towns and specific areas. At risk are the areas where economics presently support naturally affordable housing and the strivers who have worked hard to have a home with a front and backyard for their kids to play.

In the case of Westport, this legislation would actually thwart our efforts to create housing diversity. We currently mandate 20% affordability for all multi-family housing and have advanced proposals to create more. We actually have done such a good job that not only did the state award us with an 8-30g moratorium that other towns are looking at what we have done to emulate it.

If this legislation came to be, developers would snap up the choicest of properties first, most likely along the river and build million dollar condos all along its banks. This would then cascade to more and more lots, especially the naturally occurring affordable, creating more unaffordable housing, stressing water, sewer, police, fire, school and road infrastructure.

The negative environmental affects would be dramatic as the walkable community envisioned would not exist as basic household needs and jobs would still be a drive away instead of within this newly over dense community. Saugatuck would grind to a halt and Greens Farms would be a shadow of itself.

Bottom line: All transit hubs and TOD’s are not the same and top down. One-size-fits-all legislation simply does not work. The only people who this would actually benefit are developers.

=======================================================

Lawrence Weisman disagrees. Because he has no mechanism like Mandell’s to respond, he asked “06880” to post his response.

Dear Matt:

It is my observation that when a debater tries to persuade an audience of the rightness of his position by offering a parade of horribles, he is almost always on the wrong side of the issue and, for want of substance, is reduced to hyperbole.
Your description of the substance of this bill and its consequences is a prime example of that tactic.

You are wrong about both the substance and the probable consequences of the bill, and your reference to those “who have worked hard to have a home with a front and backyard for their kids to play” is a classic dog whistle in favor of exclusionary policies.

Connecticut has a systemic bureaucratic problem in addition to its systemic racial problem. Government in our state is fractured. We have counties but no county or regional government with authority to address what are clearly regional problems, among which are transportation, the environment, and housing.

So rather than trying to deal with regional issues in an uncoordinated town by town basis, we are obliged to rely on statewide action to produce uniform results. That’s what this bill is intended to do and why it is needed.

Westport is not the villain in this piece. Our P&Z has done and continues to do its part to address housing inequity and the need for affordable housing, and it is even considering “as of right” accessory dwelling units.

1177 Post Road East includes 30% affordable units, according to state standards.

You say that “as of right” means without P&Z approval, thereby suggesting that it means unregulated, but what you don’t say is that these accessory units do not require P&Z approval precisely because they are limited by regulation as to size, height, building coverage, number of parking spaces, and the amount of unused permissible coverage on the lot in question.

You do yourself, your constituents and the town as a whole a grave disservice by urging a point of view which is ungenerous, ill-considered, and provincial, and by playing to the fears and ultimately the prejudices of those who are resistant to change.

We desperately need new ideas for solutions to problems which, because they have existed for so many years, are assumed to be immune to correction. This bill is a judicious and creative step in the right direction which deserves your support.

Sincerely,
Larry

====================================================

Last night, State Senator Tony Hwang held a Facebook Live meeting on proposed zoning legislation. Among the bills is the one referenced above.

There is a public hearing in Hartford this Monday (March 15). Click here for information on that hearing, as well as a video of Hwang’s discussion. (Hat tip: Cornelia Fortier)