Tag Archives: Lawrence Weisman

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 11 Gallery

Week 11 of our online gallery features another wide variety of local Westport artwork.

Watercolors, charcoal, photos, videos, even furniture-making — it’s all here in our regular Saturday feature.

Each week, you show off your creativity and spirit; each week, we gain insights into your COVID-filled moods.

Keep sending your work. Professional, amateur, old, young — we want your paintings, collages, sketches, photos, sculptures, cartoons, whatever. Student submissions are particularly welcome!

The only rule: It must be inspired by, reflective of, or otherwise related to the times we’re going through. Email dwoog@optonline.net.

“Empty Beach” (Martin Howard)

“Staying Strong” (Elizabeth Devoll)

Staples High School art teacher Angela Simpson says, “As part of distance learning, I make demo videos for my students. For the one on how to make a multi-color registered silk screen print using an adhesive film media, I created a print of my beloved dog, Teddy. The print was a hit at home. Now I’ve been ‘commissioned’ by my son to create a version printed on a black hoodie.”

“Backwards and in Heels” (Lawrence Weisman)

Amy Saperstein made this table in her garage workshop. She says, “I must be honest. It is extremely flimsy, and likely to collapse at any moment! I found the white branch in my yard, and had the wood for the top in the garage.”

“The Beach is My Happy Place” (Amy Schneider)

“Not Venice Carnival” (Lisa Weinstein)

“Unconnected Now” (Karen Weingarten)

Susan Lloyd says, “This is Saint Dymphna, an Irish gal with a horrible backstory; patron saint of depression and anxiety. I am not Catholic; I just like saints and their histories, and of course shells.”

A video tribute, from Rob Feakins:

Ann Chernow’s garden, near Main Street. “People walking by feel good seeing these,” she says. (Photo/James Walsh)

Roseann Spengler says, “Under house arrest like Cinderella, I have discovered new friends. Making them masks is more important than making them clothes.”

“Seagulls Above a Watercolor Sky” (Photo/Patricia McMahon)

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 10 Gallery

Our Saturday gallery has hit double digits — in duration, that is. We’ve always shown at least a dozen works each week.

Photos, watercolors, paintings, acrylic, chalk messages and more… each week, you show off your creativity and spirit; each week, we gain insights into your moods.

Please keep sending your work. Professional, amateur, old, young — we want your paintings, collages, sketches, photos, sculptures, cartoons, whatever. Student submissions are particularly welcome.

The only rule: It must be inspired by, reflective of, or otherwise related to the times we’re going through. Email dwoog@optonline.net.

(David Vita)

“Corona Crazy” (Laura Overton)

“Sophie in Quarantine” (Claudia Rossman)

“Time to Read,” graphite on paper (Francis Vitale)

Irene Mastriacovo says, “My yard is now my ‘go-to’ for walks. I enjoy the little things in life, like the birth of spring. The budding plants and flowers bring hope.”

Origami rug, with 2,000 birds (John Millock)

“Pandemic Provisions,” acrylic paint on cardboard box (Roberta Delano)

Artist Norah Leigh Parker turned 9 years old yesterday!

“Compo” (Lawrence Weisman)

“Protecting Our Totem” (Karen Weingarten)

Untitled (Libby Turner, age 13)

Leonor Dao Turut says, “gardening and making art keep me calm and focused amid the fears of this pandemic.”

(Amy Schneider)

Art*6*8*8*Art — Week 9 Gallery

The coronavirus crisis continues — and Westporters continue to make art.

Once again, we’ve got all kinds in our Saturday gallery: photos, watercolors, paintings, acrylic, chalk messages and more. Each week, our readers show us their creativity and spirit; each week, we gain insights into their moods.

And our own.

Please keep sending your work. Professional, amateur, old, young — we want your paintings, collages, sketches, photos, sculptures, cartoons, whatever. Student submissions are particularly welcome.

The only rule: It must be inspired by, reflective of, or otherwise related to the times we’re going through. Just email dwoog@optonline.net.

“A Wish.” Karen Nordberg took this photo before she lost her grandmother to Covid19.

“A Hole in My Heart.” After her grandmother died, Karen Nordberg walked again. She found this.

“GFS 4S 2020.” Elizabeth Chang created this in response to Greens Farms Elementary  School art teacher Cameryn Robinson’s request to make art that brings the school together. Elizabeth — a 4th grader in Mrs. Stroud’s class — says that each small nail represents the home of a classmate. The large one is GFS itself.

“Feet,.” Self-portrait by Benj Serfaty, a 6th grader at Bedford Middle School.

“Corona Cootie.” Mary Ann Nielson reinvented the traditional game “Cootie.”

Untitled (Marita Driscoll)

“Oyster Gatherers — With Profound Apologies to John Singer Sargent” (Lawrence Weisman)

“Hanging Together” (Karen Weingarten)

Molly Alger spotted this whimsical scene outside Winslow Park Animal Hospital…

… while Les Dinkin saw this on Bermuda Road …

… and Sandra Long noticed this on Birchwood Lane.

“Connected” (Amy Schneider)

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 2 Gallery

Last week, “06880” debuted “0*6*Art*Art*0.”

Every Saturday, we’ll share readers’ artwork. Professional, amateur, old, young  — send us your painting, collage, sketch, photo, sculpture, chalkwork, cartoon, whatever.

The only rule is it must be inspired by, reflective of, or otherwise related to the times we’re going through. We’re all experiencing tons of emotions, and art is a wonderful way to express (and share) them. Email your submission to dwoog@optonline.net.

Here is today’s gallery.

Keep the submissions coming. If yours is not posted yet, be patient. There will be more next Saturday. And, unfortunately, for some time to come.

Joanie Landau’s “Hope” was inspired by Robert Indiana’s “Love.”

Brandon Malin’s medium is photography. The Staples High School senior’s drone shot of downtown Westport — empty at night, in the midst of the pandemic — is striking.

Untitled, Beth DeVoll

Artwork by Merri Mueller’s young Fillow Street neighbors Addie and Nora (ages 4 and 6)

“Compassion” (Miggs Burroughs)

Ellen Greenberg made “The Birds and the Bees” for a friend’s first baby shower (postponed now until after the birth). She dropped it in a sealed bag at her friend’s house. The expectant mom is a beekeeper. “I want her to remember their joy, and the love of all their friends during these challenging times,” Ellen says.

Amy Schneider’s collage expresses how she feels these days.

“Peaceful Valley” (Laura Loffredo, age 8)

“The Low Hum of Anxiety” (Jennifer Sabella)

“Comforting” (Lawrence Weisman)

Julie Van Norden painted this last year. “Prophetic about social distancing,” she says.

Emma Nordberg, age 15, took this photo during the first week of quarantine. “Despite the virus, it’s a beautiful spring,” she says.

Westporters Bring Hospice Care To Fairfield County

Today in Westport, approximately 25 men and women could benefit from hospice care.

Suffering from terminal illnesses, in the final weeks of their lives, they also face the reality that their relatives are too elderly — or too far away — to provide the care they need.

Three of those patients are younger than 50. To spare their young children awful memories, they do not want to die at home.

Yet options are limited. For many years, Branford was the only dedicated hospice in Connecticut. The concept has siince spread to hospitals and institutions. But there is still no small, neighborhood, residential hospice in Fairfield County.

Soon, there may be.

A group of dedicated volunteers — hospice nurses, elder care workers, attorneys, architects and others — announce today on “06880” a plan for Fairfield County Hospice House.

A rendering of Fairfield County's planned hospice.

A rendering of Fairfield County’s planned hospice.

If all goes well, they hope to open a year from now. The site is 427 Roxbury Road in Stamford, just 1/5 mile from Merritt Parkway Exit 33.

Westporters Larry Weisman and Lynda Tucker are 2 of the prime forces behind the project.

Tucker ran a children’s hospice in Cincinnati before moving here 12 years ago. Several years ago, she devised a plan for a 4-bed hospice in an existing house on the Baron’s South property.

It did not work out. But as a hospice nurse who sees 75 or 80 patients a year in Westport alone, she knew there is an enormous need for such a facility. Several other highly motivated women believed in the mission too.

Plantings like these will enhance the grounds of the proposed hospice.

Plantings like these will enhance the grounds of the proposed hospice.

Weisman — a Westport attorney — provided many hours of pro bono work. Fairfield County Hospice House became a 501(c)(3) corporation.

The group got a big break when they learned of the 1.3-acre Stamford property. It lay vacant for years, after a community center burned to the ground. A deed restriction limits is use to a non-profit. The nearly-defunct organization that owned the land was happy to give it to FCHH. They even threw in $82,000 that remained in their dormant bank account.

Attorney Richard Redniss went to work on zoning issues. Wesley Stout Associates provided architectural and site drawings, also pro bono. The Colonial-style hospice will include 6 rooms, all with outside access; a central living room with fireplace; a kitchen, and administrative offices.

“It is very much a house, for people with very specific needs,” Weisman says.

Hospice residents will have easy access to the outdoors, as shown in these plans.

Hospice residents will have easy access to the outdoors, as shown in these plans.

Offers of help poured in. Westport excavator Scott Walker and Stamford builder Gus Pappajohn will work at cost. Gault will contribute propane tanks.

Construction is almost ready to begin. But funding is needed.

The target is $5.5 million. Organizers estimate the facility will cost $2.5 million, including furnishings. $3 million is budgeted for working capital. (Jewish Senior Services will provide primary nursing care. Payments will be on a sliding scale. No one will be turned away for an inability to pay.)

Westport’s Newman’s Own and Stamford-based Purdue Pharma have already made grants. Without any publicity, a few individual donations have come in. FCHH will soon begin a capital campaign.

A view of the Colonial-style building.

A view of the Colonial-style building.

Weisman, Tucker, Westporter Dr. Richard Zelkowitz and other board members are excited about the plan, and the progress they’ve made. Soon, they believe, Fairfield County will have its 1st, and desperately needed, residential hospice.

Many local residents — and their loved ones — can at last rest easy.

(For more information — or to help — write PO Box 4606, Stamford, CT 06907, or call 203-912-6429.)

Worship And A B&B

If you’re one of the 99 percent (the Westporters who left town for the schools’ winter break last week — haha, the weather was gorgeous!), or simply haven’t read the local papers in a month or so, there are a couple of stories you may have missed.

Both involve Westport’s most contentious subject: dogs bad drivers zoning.

The first is in the planning stages. Jarvis and Coke Anne Wilcox own an 1813 home on 25 Turkey Hill South that they hope to convert to a 3-room B&B. They’ve owned it since 1986, and rent it out — they live in another home not far away — but in a “dismal” real estate market, the couple believe a small B&B makes more sense.

The Wilcoxes owned a Hamptons inn (as opposed to a Hampton Inn) from 1992 to 2008.

The potential B&B at 25 Turkey Hill South.

A text amendment is needed to permit a B&B in a residential zone. The last such establishment like it here  was the Cotswold Inn, at 76 Myrtle Avenue. Surrounded by residences, as well as medical and law offices in converted homes — not far from Town Hall and the Westport Historical Society — the Cotswold Inn was such a low key presence, many Westporters had no idea it was here.

On the other hand, it was so quiet many others don’t realize it closed years ago.

The Wilcoxes hope their B&B will be similar to the Cotswold Inn: a low-key, low-impact spot that will nevertheless provide work for a few folks, and bring tourist dollars to town.

Meanwhile, across the river, another zoning battle looms. Beit Chaverim Synagogue hopes to move from its rented quarters on 85 Post Road West — in a small house just down from Lincoln Street — across the street and up the hill, to property it owns at 24 Ludlow Road. They would raze the structure — built in 1868 — and build a new synagogue.

The potential Beit Chaverim synagogue at 24 Ludlow Road.

The issue here is not zoning. All places of worship are located in residential zones, says attorney Lawrence Weisman. (I thought I had him on the Saugatuck Congregational Church, but he pointed out that the back part of the property extends into a residential area.)

The issue here is parking. Beit Chaverim has a “positive traffic study,” Weisman says, and offered to request that “No Parking” signs be posted on the street. They’ll also request a “Left Turn Only” sign at the exit, forcing traffic to the Post Road and not north to King’s Highway, and will arrange for off-site parking during peak holiday and event times.

Neighbors are skeptical. They worry about overflow parking on the narrow street. A related issue involves current parking regulations for houses of worship, new ones proposed by Weisman, and what power the fire marshal should have in determining parking standards for churches and synagogues.

As with all things zoning, both the B&B and Beit Chaverim are a long way from opening the doors to their new homes. Chances are good, though, that you’ll read much more about both issues in the months ahead.