Tag Archives: Tom Kretsch

Downtown Pulses With Art Show Life

The 49th annual Westport Fine Arts Festival was bopping along today.

Just-right weather — the sweet spot between last year’s unseasonably cold rain, and previous years’ sweltering July temperatures — drew a couple of thousand folks to Main and Elm Streets.

(Photo/Lauri Weiser)

At 2 p.m., a brief thunderstorm rolled in.

But it quickly passed. The sun returned. Dozens of artists — and many more art-lovers — smiled again.

Popular photographer (and Westporter) Tom Kretsch.

The show is on until 5 p.m. today. It runs tomorrow (Sunday, May 29) from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Click here for more information.

One work for sale …

… and another.

Great Stuff, for sure …

… and more sculptures.

Westporter Nancy Breakstone exhibits …

… while others came from all over.

Booths line Main Street …

… and artists of a different kind take the “stage.” (All photos/Dan Woog, unless otherwise noted)

PS: It takes a ton of work to make a show like this happen. Kudos to the Westport Downtown Association — including their Abbey Road-like volunteers (below):

(Photo/Robin Tauck)

Roundup: Business & Arts, Tom Kretsch, Glass Recycling …

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Two of our town’s most powerful engines are business and the arts.

The Westport Library brings both together on Wednesday, March 9 (7 p.m., in-person and Zoom). The event is called “Exploring the Intersection of Arts and Business.”

First Selectwoman Jen Tooker leads a discussion with commercial developer David Waldman, architect Rick Hoag and business owner Andrea Pecoriello. Click here for details, and to register.

Bedford Square — built by David Waldman — is home to many businesses, including permanent and pop-up art galleries. This is Sorelle.

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Admit it: We’re all stressed. We’d love to go to Maine to relax — or even cherished local spots, like the beach.

We can’t always do that. But if you’ve got even a bit of free time, head over to Gordon Fine Arts (1701 Post Road East, across from Goodwill).

The gallery features “A Symphony of Sea and Sand,” Westport photographer Tom Kretsch’s soothing shots from here and Maine.

And if you can’t get there, click here for Tom’s equally soothing website.

(Photo/Tom Kretsch)

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The transfer station on the Sherwood Island Connector has a new recycling container.

It’s for glass — specifically beverage and condiment bottles, and juice and fruit jars. Glass should be rinsed, and lids removed.

Unacceptable items include mirrors, drinking glasses, ceramic cups and plates, clay flower pots, crystal, light bulbs, window glass and ovenware.

(Photo/Bob Weingarten)

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Howard Maynard died Sunday in Westport. He had lived here for 62 years.

After serving with the military in Korea for almost 2 years, Howard graduated from the University of California at Berkeley. He worked for Westinghouse in Bridgeport, then for 3 decades for Exxon in New York, in computer applications. He spent 4 years in London, where he developed an email system for the company.

After Exxon, he applied his knowledge and skills to Young & Rubicam in New York.

Howard was a skilled craftsman in his wood shop and darkroom. He loved chamber music and cars.

He served on many boards, including Human Services, the Westport Weston Health Department and Westport Library. He was proud of assisting with the library’s renovation.

His family says that Howard “lived a long and peaceful life. He was spare with his words and logical with his thinking. He fervently expressed gratitude for all he was given and obtained during his life — proud of his career and his post-retirement volunteer work for Westport.

“What really mattered to Howard, however, was his family, especially Mary, his wife of 65 years. They made the most of their time together, traveling often and widely.

Mary survives him, as do their children Douglass Maynard, Mallory McGrath and Allison deVaux and 7 grandchildren.

He donated his body to Yale Medical School. No services are planned. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Regional Hospice in Danbury.

Howard Maynard

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Today’s “Westport … Naturally” photo shows a scene any cat owner knows well: Michael Catarevas’ Licorice stuck inside, watching a squirrel chipmunk race by outdoors.

“If only…!” the cat is thinking. The squirrel chipmunk, of course, is oblivious.

(Photo/Michael Catarevas)

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And finally … Gary Brooker died Saturday, at 76, after battling cancer.

He was Procol Harum’s singer, pianist and composerin . The British band’s “A Whiter Shade of Pale” is one of the most memorable from the 1967 Summer of Love. It’s #57 on Rolling Stones “500 Greatest Songs of All Time,” and is in the Grammy Hall of Fame.

But Procol Harum was much more than just that Bach-derived song with haunting, mystical lyrics. They played and toured for 50 years. And in 2003 — in recognition of his charitable service — Queen Elizabeth made Gary Brooker a Member of the Order of the British Empire. Click here for a wonderful obituary.

 

Roundup: Downtown Tunnel, Downtown Cleanup, Compo Shoe …

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In 2014, “Tunnel Vision” — Miggs Burroughs’ clever series of lenticular photos, showing Westporters connecting with each other (and each one changes, depending on your viewing angle) — turned a drab pedestrian walkway between Main Street and Parker Harding Plaza into a lively, creative tourist attraction.

“Tunnel Vision,” in the walkway between Main Street and Parker Harding Plaza

Although — 7 years later — plenty of people still don’t know it exists.

Recently, the images were refurbished and reinstalled. A small reception, including a ceremonial re-lighting, is planned soon.

Also in the works: great visibility.

Miggs and Mark Yurkiw are seeking approval to add awnings to the tunnel’s front and back entrances. They’ll be an easy way for shoppers to find the handy cut-through (and enjoy Miggs’ photos).

They’ll also be an easily identifiable shelter for people waiting for a friend or ride, in all kinds of weather.

PS: Check out the new name: “Tunnel of Love and Community (TLC).”

Rendering of the proposed tunnel awning on Main Street.

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Speaking of downtown: Westporters of all ages headed there yesterday, for the first annual Riverwalk clean-up.

Sustainable Westport, Staples High School’s Zero Waste Committee and the Coleytown Elementary School PTA’s Sustainability Committee met behind Starbucks, then fanned out to remove trash from the riverfront, on both sides of the Ruth Steinkraus Cohen Bridge.

They spent 3 hours, and filled 25 buckets.

The rest of Westport — and all kinds of wildlife — are grateful.

It takes a village to clean up a village.

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Are you missing a shoe?

This one was spotted yesterday at Compo Beach. The photo comes courtesy of 10-year-old Samantha Perrotta.

(Photo/Samantha Perrotta)

Then — a couple of hours later — I got this, from June Rose Whittaker:

(Photo/June Rose Whittaker)

There must be a story behind this. Though I’m not sure we want to know.

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Looking for a special — and beautiful — holiday gift?

Longtime photographer Tom Kretsch has some ideas.

How about “Touching Maine,” his beautiful book of essays and images of coastal Maine? A 4″ x 4″ acryclic photo block? Or a gift certificate for one of his photos? There are plenty, taken throughout Fairfield County and beyond. Click here to see.

Email tom@peacefulplacesphoto.com for more information.

(Photo/Tom Kretsch)

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Today’s “Westport … Naturally” photo shows a beautiful gingko biloba tree. It’s in Ted Horowitz’s back yard on Wilton Road — but now everyone can enjoy it!

(Photo/copyright Ted Horowitz)

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And finally … today marks the 58th anniversary of President Kennedy’s assassination. I’m still not convinced we know the whole truth.

Roundup: Patsie Bonardi, Keith Haring, Broadway …

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It took a while for this news to make it here. But it was worth waiting for.

After a long and legendary teaching career in Westport, beloved elementary school icon Patsie Bonardi returned to her hometown of Bethlehem, New Hampshire.

For her 90th birthday in June, the town gathered along Main Street. They celebrated her with a surprise “reverse parade.” Residents gathered outside the theater, post office and library, holding signs and cheering as she rode by in her convertible — with a police and fire truck escort.

Elementary school students held handmade signs.

Bonardi was a longtime supporter of the Colonial Theater, and served as a library trustee and Home Health Care Board member. As part of her birthday celebration, residents raised $1,300 in her name for the theater.

(Click here for the full story, from the Littleton Courier. Hat tips: John and Carol Waxman)

Patsie Bonardi, during her parade. (Photo/Angel Larcom)

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The “Piece by Piece” artwork was unveiled Friday at the Westport Library. Sixty local artists each contributed a panel — not knowing how it would fit into the “big picture.” They had no idea what the finished piece was.

Turns out to be a work by Keith Haring.

The final work impressed the Westport Library crowd. (Photo/Miggs Burroughs)

Individual panels were on sale, with proceeds split between the Library and the artist of that particular panel.

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Adam Bremen was born with cerebral palsy. He’s used an electric wheelchair all his life.

In 2017, he decided to become more physically fit. Thanks to water aerobics and the Keto diet, he lost 45 pounds. His next step was to create a good-tasting Keto-based snack bar. He called it Keto Krisp.

This past weekend — after quarantining for 16 months — Adam traveled from California to Westport. He visited his sister Erin, who lives here.

Adam had never kayaked before. But the crew at Westport Paddle Club took care of him. He and his family had a fantastic time.

He’s thanking them by sending a package of Keto Krispy bars. And he’ll wear his WPC t-shirt proudly.

Adam Bremen and Westport Paddle Club owner Robbie Guimond (front), with Adam’s family and WPC staff members.

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Sure, the Levitt Pavilion offers 50 nights of free summer entertainment.

But here’s a different kind of free show, at a very different site.

Karen Elizaga lives on Soundview Drive, between Norwalk and Westport Avenues. This Friday (July 16, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.), she’s hosting a group of Broadway stars.

Devin Ilaw (“Miss Saigon,” “Les Miserables”), Sarah Beth Pfeifer (“Lightning Thief”), Staples High School graduate Mia Gentile (“Kinky Boots”) and others will sing in her front yard. Everyone is welcome to gather on the beach, and listen.

The goal is to raise awareness — and funds, if you’d like to lend support — of Broadway for Arts Education. The non-profit provides arts education to underserved youth in New York, Haiti and India.

It should be a great event. And even though there’s no ticket, feel “free” to donate to this important group.

Free concert on Soundview.

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From horseback riders to model plane flyers, there’s always something going on at Sherwood Island State Park.

But yesterday might have been a first: an in-the-water wedding.

Patricia Auber was attracted by the singing and tambourine playing. She wanted to keep a respectful distance, so there are no details about the bridge and groom. Still, she did capture this wonderful photo:

A minister leads the ceremony, in Long Island Sound. (Photo/Patricia Auber)

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Noted Westport photographer Tom Kretsch, and Shapleigh Smith of Stowe, Vermont have been friends for 65 years.

The Newtown natives parted ways after high school. But they reunited in Stowe, where Shap lives and Tom bought a timeshare. at the Trapp Family Lodge.

Last winter they spent time photographing the back roads of the Northeast Kingdom. Now they’re showing their work, back in their hometown of Newtown.

This Thursday (July 15, 5:30 to 7 p.m.) is the opening of “Down on Vermont Country Road: Old Friends and New Visions” at the Cyrenius Booth Library on Main Street.  The show runs through Labor Day.

One of Tom Kretsch’s Vermont photos.

Staples High School boys soccer tri-captain Bruno Guiduli knows the important of giving back.

During the past year he’s raised over $2,300 for TOPSoccer. The non-profit helps special needs youngsters play the sport Bruno loves.

This Saturday (July 17, 8 a.m. to noon), he invites everyone to Wakeman Field. He’ll set up a special goal he built with his father, Barry. All are welcome to test their skills, while learning about TOPSoccer. Donations will be gratefully accepted.

Bruno Guiduli, with the TOPSoccer goal he invites everyone to shoot at.

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This weekend’s Fresh Market osprey update, from Carolyn Doan:

“I can’t believe how big they’ve gotten. I was there for breakfast. Dad brought a fish, right on time. He called from a tree to wake everyone up, and went over to the nest once all 3 were ready to eat. Two of the siblings are very affectionate with one another, which was wonderful to watch.

“They were stretching their wings a lot, so fledging is imminent.”

(Photo/Carolyn Doan)

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Speaking of young birds: Today’s “Westport … Naturally” photo shows a pair of gorgeous baby robins. Cutest image ever?

(Photo/Jacqueline Byrne)

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Kendall Gardiner spotted this on Facebook:

A man in France takes care of the grave of an American soldier, killed on D-Day in Normandy, age 29. He’d like to contact any relatives he can find.

The soldier’s name was Sgt. Glenn Everett “Tex” Moats. He lived in Fairfield. If any “06880” readers remember the family, click here to respond. (Hat tip: Kendall Gardiner)

Sgt. Glenn Everett “Tex” Moats

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Nadine Cherna is proud of all her piano students. But she’s particularly proud of Eric Gordonos. The 13-year-old plays everything she asks, everything he can find — and then composes his own pieces. Here is an excerpt:

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And finally … speaking of talented young pianists, today would have been Van Cliburn’s 87th birthday. He rocketed too fame in 1958, when — just 23 years old — he won the 1st International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow, at the height of the Cold War.

Cliburn died in 2013, at 78.

 

 

 

 

 

 

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 58 Gallery

Amy Schneider leads this week’s art gallery, with a May Day submission.

That sets the tone for much of the rest of the work. It’s been a beautiful season, and “06880” artists capture it beautifully.

Each week — no matter what the weather — we feature whatever suits your mood. Some of you are professionals; most are amateurs. Experience does not matter. We want all your art!

Student submissions are especially welcome. So are artists who have not submitted previously.

Email dwoog@optonline.net, to share your work with the world.

“Happy May Day” (Amy Schneider)

“When Do I Get My Shot?” (Ellin Spadone)

“Gig in the Garden” (Brian Whelan)

“Spray of Flowers” (Lucy Johnson)

“The Door to the Other Side” — Hillandale Road (Karen Weingarten)

Untitled (Lawrence Weisman)

“The Lightness of Being, Wakeman Place” (Tom Kretsch)

Roundup: Maine, Save Cockenoe Now, Melissa Joan Hart, More


Who doesn’t love Maine?

Tom Kretsch sure does. The longtime Westport photographer has just published “Touching Maine.” The hard-cover book’s 93 pages of images and text capture the essence of that special state: its water, rocks, fog, islands, structures, dinghies and abstract impressions.

A signed copy is $50. For $100, you’ll get a signed copy plus one of the 8×10 prints shown below. Email tom@peacefulplacesphoto.com, or call 203-644-4518.


Lindsay Shurman is searching for a holiday gift for her husband. And she needs “06880” readers’ help.

She wants to give him Walter Einsel’s iconic “Save Cockenoe Now” poster (below). Back in the 1960s, it was everywhere — and played a role in the town’s purchase of the island off Compo Beach, saving it from becoming a nuclear power plant (!).

A few are still floating around. But The Flat sold the one they had. And Lindsay just lost a Westport Auction bidding war.

“Any idea where I may find an original?” she asks.

“Maybe someone is willing to part with it for a price. Or a donation made in their name to a favorite cause. I could even settle for a reproduction. I just need an original to scan.

“Any help would be so appreciated. I’m obsessed with this poster, and gifting it to my husband this holiday season!”

If you’ve got a lead, email lindsay.shurman@gmail.com. And sssshhhh …  don’t tell her husband!


Melissa Joan Hart has been very busy lately.

The Westport resident produced, directed and starred in 3 new Lifetime holiday films.

“Feliz NaviDAD” — yes, the name of the classic song by Westonite Jose Feliciano — premiered Saturday. “Dear Christmas,” with James Priestley, airs this Friday (November 27, 8 p.m.). “Once Upon a Main Street” follows on Sunday (November 27, 8 p.m.). (Hat tip: Dick Lowenstein, via Connecticut Post)

Jason Priestley and Melissa Joan Hart, in “Dear Christmas.”


Distance education isn’t new to Taylor Harrington. The 2015 Staples High School graduate works at Akimbo, a company that creates online learning experiences.

The pandemic — as awful as it is — has created opportunities. Taylor and her team saw a chance to help young people looking to grow.

They created The Emerging Leaders Program, a free, 5-day online workshop for people ages 16-25,looking to make a difference in the world .

The first 2 sessions were powerful. The next is set for January 4-8. Young leaders — or anyone knowing one — can click here for details. Applications close December 1.

Taylor Harrington


And finally … back in 1961, teenagers were doing (supposedly) the “Bristol Stomp.” Len Barry, lead singer of the Dovells — the band with that hit — died earlier this month, at 78. Four years later, he had another smash with “1-2-3.”

Roundup: Sweet Photos, Trash, Pumpkins, More


Westporters love Tom Kretsch’s photos. They love Saugatuck Sweets. And they love Al’s Angels.

So plan to stop by the ice cream shop patio on the river tomorrow (Saturday, October 10, 1 p.m. to 8 p.m.). Kretsch will display his evocative images — many of his home town.

A percentage of all sales benefits Al’s Angels, the nonprofit started by Saugatuck Sweets owner Al DiGuido to help families with children battling cancer, and families with food needs.

(Photo/Tom Kretsch)


Last weekend, 35 mothers and daughters from Westport’s National Charity League spent a cleaning Compo Beach. The effort supported NCL’s philanthropy partner, Save the Sound.

Volunteers removed over 45 pounds of garbage from the beach. They found PPE, plastic bags, straws and food wrappers, along with 235 cigarette butts, 160 bottle caps and 33 balloons. Data collected will help Save the Sound stop debris at its source. 

A small bit of all the trash.


What’s new at the Senior Center?

Its first-ever pumpkin decorating contest. It’s October 30 (11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.).

Submissions will be judged on originality and scariness. Members can vote for their favorite pumpkins while picking up a drive-through lunch (chicken pot pie, salad, roll, cookie and Halloween treats) from staff members (in costumes).

Seniors can enjoy their meal while socially distancing in the parking lot. Prizes include a Halloween goodie bucket, and a gift card for a Senior Center luncheon.

Lunch is $8. The cost to enter the contest: free (and priceless).


ADL Connecticut’s 10th annual Walk Against Hate will look from the first 9. Though participants can’t join together physically, they’ll still send a powerful message.

Individuals, families, friends, colleagues and teammates are invited to get creative. They can walk wherever they want, from October 12-18. Registration is free, though fundraising is encouraged to help ADL fight anti-Semitism, racism and all forms of hate.

Fundraisers who give or get more than $50 get an ADL bandanna. The first 1,000 people to raise over $150 receive t-shirts.

ADL Connecticut has a strong Westport presence. Director Steve Ginsburg lives here; so does Walk Against Hate chair Claudia Cohen.

Jill Nadel chairs the outreach committee). Terry Bernard, Shelly Herst, Margie Jacobson, Ken Backman, Sara Weiner (co-chair of the education committee), Bret Weiner, Chuck Harris, Liz Kaner, Lynne Goldstein and John Kaufman are all on ADL’s state board. Many other Westporters serve in other capacities.

To register for or donate to the Walk Against Hate, click here.


Instead of a traditional luncheon, the American Cancer Society’s annual “Women Leading the Way to Wellness” event (Wednesday, November 18), is on Facebook Live.

There’s an option to buy a $125 “Wellness Box” to enhance the viewing experience. The boxes are valued at over $175, and include products from The Granola Bar, Performance Physical Therapy and West.

Click here for more information.


And finally … this is the birthday of John Lennon. He would have been — are you ready? — 80 years old today.

 

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 5 Gallery

Hard to believe this is already the 5th edition of our online art gallery.

Every Saturday, we share readers’ artwork. Professional, amateur, old, young  — send us your painting, collage, sketch, photo, sculpture, chalkwork, cartoon, whatever.

The only rule is it must be inspired by, reflective of, or otherwise related to the times we’re going through. We’re all experiencing tons of emotions, and art is a wonderful way to express (and share) them. Email your submission to dwoog@optonline.net.

Keep the submissions coming. If yours is not posted yet, be patient. There will be more next Saturday. And unfortunately, for some time to come.

“The Lightness of Being: Magnolia Blossoms in Late Afternoon Light” (Tom Kretsch, on Compo Road South)

“We Are All In This Together” (Morgan Veltri, Grade 11)

After the Westport Country Playhouse announced it would be dark for the rest of this year, Pat Blaufuss writes of this photo by Kathleen O’Rourke: “Waiting for the curtain to rise again. The darkened theater, with only the reflection of the ghost light on stage.”

“More Anxiety” (Larry Gordon)

Every day they’re home, each Curran kid paints a rock.

“Girl Donning a Flowered Hat During These Daunting Days” (Judith Marks-White)

“Stuck in Your Hometown? Or Loving It” (Drone video by Rob Feakins)

“Just Married. Social Distancing.” (Amy Schneider)

“The Times They Are A-Changin'” clock. (Steve Lunt)

Josh Fagen says: “Per her mom’s great idea, our 6-year-old Lola made art on her friends’ driveways using glitter chalk, with messages of how much she misses them. We warned parents so they would be inside when we showed up. One of Lola’s friends is coming over now to leave her own art message on our driveway.”

Bob Weingarten has seen this on Morningside Drive South for nearly a year. It reminds him of a helping hand.

Staples High School freshman Dylan Chatterjee made this with his father to celebrate Easter — and social distancing.

 

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 3 Gallery

Welcome back to “0*6*Art*Art*0.”

Every Saturday, we share readers’ artwork. Professional, amateur, old, young  — send us your painting, collage, sketch, photo, sculpture, chalkwork, cartoon, whatever.

The only rule is it must be inspired by, reflective of, or otherwise related to the times we’re going through. We’re all experiencing tons of emotions, and art is a wonderful way to express (and share) them. Email your submission to dwoog@optonline.net.

Here is today’s gallery.

PS: Keep the submissions coming. If yours is not posted yet, be patient. There will be more next Saturday. And, unfortunately, for some time to come.

Nell Waters Bernegger took this Winslow Park photo last summer. She calls it “the gateway to hope.”

Susan Joy Miller explains, “These are Tai chi moves I miss doing as we shelter in place. Fair Lady works her shuttle, hands moving like clouds, white crane spreads its wings, sweep the lotus with a kick, repulse the monkey and snake creeps down.”

“Monet Moment on the Saugatuck” (Tom Kretsch)

“Still Life with Sanitizer” (JoAnn Davidson, former Westport teacher, age 89)

“Social Isolation is Getting Old” (Beth DeVoll, who notes that the Kewpie Doll was created by Westport’s own Rose O’Neill in the early 1900s).

This represents Hugo Arber’s full house, and all the card games his family is playing. He’s a 3rd grader at Coleytown Elementary School — and today is his 9th birthday! 

“Anxiety” (Lawrence Gordon)

The Mannino kids’ chalk art message.

East 1st Street, New York City (Susan Thomsen)

Nina Bentley

“Is baking art?” asks Amy Saperstein. “Some meringues and Oreo chocolate chip cookies were made completely independently by Myla Saperstein, age 11, but eaten by all the Sapersteins.” The “06880” answer: This is GREAT art! 

Irene Mastriocovo says, “My yard is now my go-to for walks. I’m enjoying the little things in life, like the birth of spring. The budding plants and flowers bring hope.”

Meandering On The Saugatuck

Bistro du Soleil — the French-Mediterranean restaurant in the old post office on Riverside Avenue — has a loyal following. But it does not get enough attention, either for its food or the ever-changing art on its walls.

This Sunday (November 3, 4 to 7 p.m.), there’s a reception for Westport photographer Tom Kretsch’s photos of the Saugatuck River — the water that runs directly behind the restaurant.

His new exhibit is called “River Take Me Along.” Tom writes:

“The River that Flows Out” is the translation of the word Saugatuck. The Paugusset Indians gave this 23-mile river, with its origins in Danbury, its name.

This treasure of a resource served first as a place of early settlements by Native Americans. Later, settlers farmed along its banks. In the 19th century it was a large shipping port, with warehouses nestled by the edge.

Saugatuck River (Photo/Tom Kretsch)

Today this winding river, flowing through the heart of our community, serves as a wondrous resource for physical and spiritual reflection. From the fishermaen who cast their lines off the Cribari swing bridge to those who fly fish up stream, from the rowers who ply its waters both solo and in team sculls, to the many who simply stop and pause to sit on a bench by the library, the Saugatuck River holds a place in the hearts and souls of many Westporters.

Living close to its banks for 45 years sparked my interest to capture the many magical moods of this flowing body of water. Its ancient path that winds its way, sacred and slow, through woods, ponds, reservoirs and finally into Long Island Sound has provided me a palette to create my impressions of its spirit and soul.

From vantage points on a kayak floating slowly down the stream, to walking along its wooded banks, to standing on a bridge on a misty morning, the river can truly “take our breath away,” as Dar Williams sings eloquently in “The Hudson.”

Saugatuck in the mist. (Photo/Tom Kretsch)

In my series of images I have tried to create both impressionistic and realistic photographs of this ever-changing body of water. I hope the work will speak to you, and draw you into the beauty and spirit of the river.

I hope too it makes you pause and appreciate what a great natural resource this river is for all of us.

Perhaps it will inspire you to take time to explore the Saugatuck’s many nooks and crannies, or simply pause on a quiet summer evening, an early misty morning fog or deep in the fall foliage season to gaze at this gift we have been given.

My journey on this water is always evolving. I continue to look for those moments that speak to me; to capture the many hidden treasures it holds, and that can only be captured in the light that breathes life into our treasure, the Saugatuck River.

(The reception this Sunday is free, and open to the public. Tom Kretsch’s exhibit runs through December 28.)