Tag Archives: Green’s Farms Road

Alert: Monday Morning Commute To Train Station, I-95 May Be Messy

The Westport Police Department says:

Due to electrical grid damage from Friday’s storm, and continuing repairs, it is anticipated that the intersection of Greens Farms Road/Bridge Street at Compo Road South may remain closed to traffic at least through the morning commute tomorrow (Monday, March 5).

No traffic will be allowed through the intersection of Greens Farms Road at Compo Road South.

Road closures will be in place at Bridge Street at Imperial Avenue, Compo Road South at Keyser Road, Greens Farms Road at Hillspoint Road, and Compo Road South at Elaine Road. Any destinations within this area will be accessible only to local traffic; all other traffic should must use detours.

Drivers traveling from all points south of the I-95 overpass on Compo Road South should follow Compo Road South to Hillspoint Road north to the intersection of Greens Farms Road. From this point, traffic will be routed either east on Greens Farms Road and/or north on Hillspoint Road.

Drivers traveling west on Greens Farms Road will be detoured north at the intersection of Greens Farms Road and Hillspoint Road toward Post Road East.

No westbound traffic will be allowed on to Greens Farms Road from the Sherwood Island Connector. This area will be accessible to local traffic only. All other traffic will be diverted north on the Sherwood Island Connector towards Post Road East.

Compo Road South will be completely closed to southbound traffic at the intersection with Keyser Road.

All southbound traffic on Imperial Avenue will be diverted west on Bridge Street. All eastbound traffic on Bridge Street will be diverted north on to Imperial Avenue.

The work may continue into Monday evening.

 

Photo Challenge #156

Every Westporter knows the Post Road. South Compo. North Avenue.

But not every Westporter knows Greens Farms Road — especially the section near Southport.

That’s a shame. You miss out on beautiful homes. Our “other” railroad station.

And last week’s photo challenge.

Peggy Lehn’s image showed a tree stump, painted to look like a happy face. It’s familiar to anyone taking a right out of the station. Bob Grant, India V. Penney, Jimmy Stablein, Barbara Wanamaker, Seth Schachter and Andrew Colabella all recognized it instantly.

It’s been there for maybe a year — after a tree was cut, or fell down.

Let’s hope it stays forever. (Click here for the photo — or go see it yourself.)

This week’s photo challenge comes courtesy of Ed Simek. If you know where in Westport you’d spot this, click “Comments” below.

Scott Smith’s Concrete Questions

The roads of Westport play an important — if often unrecognized — role in our lives. When we do think about them, it’s in the context of traffic, alternate routes, that sort of thing.

Scott Smith thinks of asphalt and concrete. The longtime Westporter writes:

The autumn flurry of repaving Westport’s road before the asphalt plants shut down for the winter makes me wonder about the status of some other byways around town. I’m thinking of the local streetscapes I travel that are still paved with concrete.

Three spots come to mind: the mile or so along Greens Farms Road between Compo and Hillspoint, and 2 blocks on Riverside — one heading toward the train station, the other from Viva’s to the VFW. Made of poured aggregate cement and laid down in blocks of 20 feet or so, these stretches of old roadway remind me of a time when things were built to last.

Concrete on Greens Farms Road …

But not always. Years ago, while re-landscaping a home I lived in off Imperial Avenue, I dug up a bunch of old concrete blocks. They were odd shapes, most 2 or 3 feet across and all 6 to 8 inches thick, smooth on one side and jagged on the other.

The house was built in 1960, on low-lying property, so I figured they were fill from when construction of the I-95 Turnpike tore through town. The chunks of pavement were a bear to raise up out of the ground, but made great stepping stones. I bet they are still there.

… on Riverside Avenue north of the Cribari Bridge …

It’s probably a state versus town issue, but as I see other local roads in the continual process of getting stripped of asphalt and replaced with new black pavement, I wonder what’s up with these concrete remnants of vintage Westport.

Are there any longtime townies — or people in Public Works — who could let the rest of us know when these roads were first laid down, and how long they might stick around?

… and near the train station. (Photos/Scott Smith)

Digging Into Westport’s 300-Year-Old Mystery

The other day, amateur historian Bob Weingarten published a story in Greens Farms Living magazine.

Read the previous sentence carefully.

The publication calls itself Greens Farms. Not Green’s Farms. Or Greensfarms.

Punctuation matters. And the punctuation of Westport’s oldest section of town was the subject of Weingarten’s piece.

I’m interested. From time to time, I’ve referred to that neighborhood in several ways. I never knew the answer — and never knew how to find out.

Weingarten quotes author Woody Klein, who called John Green “the largest landholder” among the 5 Bankside Farmers who in the late 1600s settled around what is now Beachside Avenue (the “banks” of Long Island Sound).

This is where the Bankside Farmers first worked the land. It looks a bit different today.

This is where the Bankside Farmers first worked the land. It looks a bit different today.

The area was called Green’s Farms. But in 1732 it was changed to Greens Farms because, Klein says, Fairfield — the town of which it was part — did not want “any individual landholder to become too independent.”

The plural form, Weingarten writes, could mean either that Green had more than one farm, or that it was “adopted from the multiple farms of the Bankside Farmers.” So Greens Farms it was.

Except in property deeds, which referred to “the Parish of Greensfarms.”

However, in 1842 — when the parish was incorporated into the 7-year-old town of Westport — the spelling became Green’s Farms.

The church of the same name adopted the apostrophe. Today it sometimes uses one, sometimes not. Sometimes on the same web page.

Green's Farms Congregational Church

The church — with or without an apostrophe.

Confusion continued, though. For decades thereafter, official documents and maps referred to both Green’s Farms and Greens Farms.

Weingarten also mentions two streets: Green’s Farms Road and Greens Farms Hollow.

The state Department of Transporation has used both spellings — and a 3rd: Green Farms, for the Metro-North station.

Weingarten cites one more example. The post office near the train station uses the apostrophe spelling on one sign, the non-apostrophe on another.

This is definitely not one of the options.

This is definitely not one of the options.

Weingarten favors Green’s Farms. So do I.

But “06880” is a democracy. So — even though the zip code is 06838 — we’ll put it to a vote. Click the poll below — and add “Comments too.”

All you have to lose is an apostrophe.


Click here for “06880+”: The easy way to publicize upcoming events, sell items, find or advertise your service, ask questions, etc. It’s the “06880” community bulletin board!

Towering Over Greens Farms Road

Remember that 120-foot cell tower proposed for a private residence on Greens Farms Road?

It’s on hold — but drivers in the area have recently noticed a smaller tower, near — but not on — the property in question.

Emergency response tower - Greens Farms Road

Hold your texts and emails (if you can get a signal). This is not that cell tower.

It’s Westport’s Emergency Response System — and it’s been there since the mid-1980s. It was installed to warn residents of impending disasters (I’m just guessing, but say, a truck accident involving toxic chemicals on nearby I-95).

The proposed cell tower will be 75 to 100 feet taller than this structure.

So why are people just now noticing it?

A widening project on Greens Farms Road (including a new turning lane onto Hillspoint, visible in the photo above), and resulting deforestation of the area, has made the Emergency Response System more prominent.

As for the cell tower: neighbors, local officials and state legislators are still working to prevent its construction on private property, in a residential zone. The town continues to seek an alternative site on state DOT property.

 

Saying Goodbye To The Bedford Estate

The Bedfords giveth.

And the Bedfords taketh away.

One of the town’s most philanthropic families — think the YMCA, schools, the Westport Woman’s Club and much, much more — has long owned property on Beachside Avenue.

But Ruth Bedford died last June, at 99. Now her estate, at 66 Beachside, is slated for demolition.

Bedford demo

The sign notes that 3 buildings are intended to be torn down. All are 114 years old.

The Bedford family also owns a 2-story house at 225 Green’s Farms Road, opposite the Nyala Farms office complex. It too was built in 1900.

And it too is slated for demolition.

Check Out The Balloons: The Sequel

North Atlantic Towers floated 2 balloons this morning. They’re part of preparations for building a cell tower in the back yard of a Greens Farms Road home.

Here’s the view from the I-95 overpass on Hillspoint Road. The view looks north.

Cell protest

A couple dozen anti-tower protesters turned up. So — in an observational capacity — did First Selectman Jim Marpe, town attorney Ira Bloom, and state representatives Jonathan Steinberg, Gail Lavielle and Tony Hwang.

(Photos by Mary Ann West)

(Photos by Mary Ann West)

State regulations appear to allow the erection of a cell tower on private property.

But Westport seldom lets an issue like this happen quietly.

 

Check Out The Balloons!

When North Atlantic Towers floats 2 balloons tomorrow morning — as part of a test for the cell tower proposed for Greens Farms Road — they’ll be greeted by a crowd of Westporters.

First Selectman Jim Marpe plans to be there. So does town attorney Ira Bloom. And conservation director Alicia Mozian.

Plus anyone else who wants to see what’s “up.”

Balloon-watchers are invited to meet at the intersection of Greens Farms and Hillspoint Road by 10 a.m. Parking is available at #116, 114, 115, 109 and 106 Greens Farms Road, and along Hillspoint Road.

Just look for the balloons!

This is NOT what will happen to the house at Greens Farms Road during tomorrow's balloon test.

This is NOT what will happen to the house at Greens Farms Road during tomorrow’s balloon test.

 

 

Today Is National Bike To Work Day. Be Careful Out There!

The long winter of our discontent has given way to the glorious spring of our bike-riding.

But though the cold and snow are gone, remnants remain. They did a number on a number of Westport roads, and the public works folks have not yet been able to repair all the damage.

Alert — and not very pleased — cyclist Larry Berman took these photos on recent rides:

Green's Farms Road, between Hillspoint and Clapboard Hill.

Green’s Farms Road, between Hillspoint and Prospect.

Clapboard Hill Road

Clapboard Hill Road.

Hyde Lane, near Long Lots Elementary School.

Hyde Lane, near Long Lots Elementary School.

Wilton Road near Exit 41 -- a closeup.

Wilton Road near Exit 41 — a closeup.

Larry says:

Hitting these potholes in a car is bone-rattling. Imagine hitting them on a 23mm bicycle tire. I hope drivers will please take extra caution around cyclists. Many times we are forced into the middle of the road to avoid dangerous shoulders.

There’s a lot to be said for Westport’s narrow, winding roads. And not all of it is “!@#$%^&*.”

We’re all in this together. Let’s slow down. Look out for each other. And take time to smell the forsythia.