Tag Archives: Eric Bosch

Online Art Gallery #130

September is (almost) over. But some “06880” readers remain on the water. Others are in the midst of the High Holy Days. Plenty are pursuing art.

A few of you are submitting it to “06880.”

Remember: This is your feature. All readers are invited to contribute. Age, level of experience, subject matter — there are no restrictions.

All genres are encouraged. Watercolors, oils, charcoal, pen-and-ink, acrylics, lithographs, macramé, jewelry, sculpture, decoupage and (yes) needlepoint — whatever you’ve got, email it to 06880blog@gmail.com. Share your work with the world!

“Rooftops” (Lucy Antek Johnson)

“Storm Swell” (Eric Bosch)

“Tugboat for Two” — at Fishers Island Sound (Peter Barlow)

“A Shtetl Rabbi Awaiting Yom Kippur” (Steve Stein)

“I Sense a Crack in my Resolve” –outdoor sculpture, Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill, Massachusetts (Mike Hibbard)

“Compo Grove” (Fred Cantor)

“Concentration” (Lawrence Weisman)

“Pretty in Pink in Portugal” (Wendy Levy)

Friday Flashback #316

In the 1960s and ’70s, Staples High School buzzed with educational innovation.

There were English courses in things like filmmaking, and an Alternatives program for students who learned in non-traditional ways. The Staples Governing Board gave students, teachers and administrators a powerful voice in nearly every aspect of school decision-making.

But radical new ideas were not limited to the high school.

In 1969, Eric Bosch was a 9th grader at Bedford Junior High (today, the building is Saugatuck Elementary School). Principal Ken Brummel had an idea: Allow teachers to teach any course they wanted, in any area that intrigued them.

Allow students to choose any courses they wanted, across all disciplines. There were no restrictions. If they wanted, they could take 7 classes of phys. ed.

And, oh yeah: Letter grades were optional. Every instructor could provide any type of evaluation they wanted: “Outstanding, Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory,” for example, or a written set of comments.

Eric Bosch’s course evaluation for “Nutrition.”

Students also graded themselves.

The “Modular Teaching Experiment” began that spring, for the final 6 weeks of the marking period.

The other day — more than 50 years later — Bosch found material from those experimental days.

He did not choose 7 periods of gym. Instead, he took:

  • “Nutrition,” (taught by Don DiGennaro)
  • “Tube Talk” (Edward Elendausky)
  • “Vampires Unlimited” (Annette Silverstone)
  • “Keeping up with the News” (Karley Higgins)
  • “Metalworking” (David Conrad_
  • “The Athlete” (Ray Comeau)
  • “Track” (Ed Hall).

Course description for “The Athlete,” taught by Ray Comeau.

Looking back, Bosch finds the 6-week session “mind blowing.” It was also — well, different.

When he was applying to Clark University 3 years later, an interviewer asked, “What the hell was going on with your 4th quarter in 8th grade?”

Eric Bosch’s 4th quarter report card included grades from traditional and experimental courses. “French was not my strong suit,” he says.

But, Bosch adds , he is “grateful that Westport’s teachers and administrators were willing to try new approaches to teaching. While some college admissions personnel might not have liked it, isn’t that the price you pay for being on the leading edge of anything?”

Early in his first year of college, Bosch recalls, he told his parents he was more prepared than many of his classmates.

The Bedford Experiment ended. But Westport schools — in particular, Staples — continued to innovate.

And what happened to Ken Brummel, the BJHS principal who pushed the envelope?

A few years later, he was named Westport’s superintendent of schools.

(“Friday Flashback” is one of “06880”‘s regular features. To help support your local blog, please click here.) 

Bedford Junior High School, back in the day.

Online Art Gallery — Week 102

Tons o’ submissions this week — including several from first-time artists. (Of course, this is not their first work. It’s their first time featured on “06880.” You understand.)

We appreciate everyone’s submissions. This gallery is open to all readers. Whatever your age and level of experience — professional or amateur, young or old. In every medium. On every topic.

All genres are encouraged. Watercolors, oils, charcoal, pen-and-ink, acrylics, lithographs, macramé, jewelry, sculpture, decoupage and needlepoint — whatever you’ve got, email it to dwoog@optonline.net. Share your work with the world!

“Variations on the Theme: The Eternal City by John Blume,” oil on canvas (Norm Siegel)

“La Donna,” Carrara marble (Alan Goldberg)

“Island Sunset” (Werner Liepolt)

“Together in Pieces,” mixed media (Joyce Landon)

Untitled (Sophia Livecchi, Staples High School Class of 2017)

“Not Just a Building” — exterior in Fairfield (Karen Weingarten)

“Thinking of Ukraine” (Suzanne Goldstein)

“Pink & Green” (Ken Runkel)

“A View of Assumption Church” (Steve Stein)

“Hoping for Harmony in Ukraine” (George Bullwinkel)

“You Can’t Get There from Here” (Lawrence Weisman)

“Nature’s Colors” (Eric Bosch)

“All is Well” (Jill Delaney)

Online Art Gallery — Week 101

World events and weather — one earth-shattering, the other just earthly — predominate in this week’s online art show.

Whatever your muse, we appreciate your submissions. This gallery is open to all readers. Whatever your age and level of experience — professional or amateur, young or old. In every medium. On every topic.

All genres are encouraged. Watercolors, oils, charcoal, pen-and-ink, acrylics, lithographs, macramé, jewelry, sculpture, decoupage and needlepoint — whatever you’ve got, email it to dwoog@optonline.net. Share your work with the world — as wonderful and worrisome as that world may be.

“First Breath” (Bonnie Erickson)

“Good Trouble.” Geoffrey Stein’s collage of Congressman John Lewis includes material from altered photographs from Lawrence Jackson; Bettman Archive – Getty Photos; Spider Martin; Associated Press; Saint Louis American; Official White House Photo Lawrence Jackson. Acrylic and pencil on canvas.

“Leaving Ukraine” (Lawrence Weisman)

“Let There be Peace” — water color (Steve Stein)

Untitled (Werner Liepolt)

Untitled — -digital art using colored fluids and water (Ken Runkel)

“Free to the Wind” (Eric Bosch)

“Snow Lantern” (Karen Weingarten)

“Looking Forward to Spring” (Ellin Spadone)

Online Art Gallery — Week 100

Our online art gallery began nearly 2 years ago, during one crisis: the first weeks of COVID.

We celebrate Week 100 during another: Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

As you’ve done for 100 weeks now, you — painters, photographers, sculptors, weavers and many other types of artists, from Westport and the rest of Fairfield County and far beyond — have sent us again some very compelling works.

They address current events, and timeless themes. They are colorful, somber, thought-provoking and inspiring. Thank you for all of them.

Whatever your muse, we appreciate your submissions. This gallery is open to all readers. Whatever your age and level of experience — professional or amateur, young or old. In every medium. On every topic.

All genres are encouraged. Watercolors, oils, charcoal, pen-and-ink, acrylics, lithographs, macramé, jewelry, sculpture, decoupage and needlepoint — whatever you’ve got, email it to dwoog@optonline.net. Share your work with the world — as wonderful and worrisome as that world may be.

Collage artist Judith Lambertson asks, “How could I paint when the world will never be the same?”

“Sunflowers for Peace” (Amy Schneider)

Steve Stein notes, “Our country and the world are at a ‘fork in the road.'”

“Compo Beach” (Rowene Weems)

“Birdhouse” (Eric Bosch)

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 99 Gallery

The real world is not far from the minds of this week’s online gallery artists.

Brian Whelan paints for peace, Kathryn O’Reardon offers a thought-provoking acrylic work, and Eric Bosch provides a timely title to a photo taken in Westport. In a non-political vein, Amy Schneider takes note of several solar eruptions, 93 million miles away.

Whatever your muse, we appreciate your submissions. This gallery is open to all readers. Whatever your age and level of experience — professional or amateur, young or old. In every medium. On every topic.

All genres are encouraged. Watercolors, oils, charcoal, pen-and-ink, acrylics, lithographs, macramé, jewelry, sculpture, decoupage and needlepoint — whatever you’ve got, email it to dwoog@optonline.net. Share your work with the world!

“May Peace Prevail in Ukraine” (Brian Whelan)

“The Missing Peace?” — acrylic on canvas (Kathryn O’Reardon)

“Solar Eruptions,” Artist Amy Schneider notes, “NASA reported several solar eruptions this month.”

Untitled. Rowene Weeks took this photo behind the Westport Library.

“Stuck in the Wall” (Karen Weingarten)

“Multi-tasking” (Lawrence Weisman)

“Putin: War is Wrong” (Eric Bosch)

No Trespassing At Nyala!

Alert “06880” reader — and open space lover — Eric Bosch sent this photo of Nyala Farm — the well-hidden-from-view office complex between the Sherwood Island Connector and Greens Farms Road, off I-95 Exit 18:

Nyala Farm

He writes:

I thought you, like many of your readers, might question the need for these threatening signs (“No Trespassing/Violators Will Be Prosecuted”). Having lived here since 1963, I can’t ever remember  seeing anything but turkeys, deer, and an occasional hawk perched up on the roof.

Perhaps soon we might also see barbed-wire and a “huge great, great wall” also. A very sad loss indeed.

Nyala Farm is, of course, home to one of Bridgewater’s offices. I’m sure the world’s largest hedge fund has more security than this $1.99 sign.