Tag Archives: Brian Lewis

Town Invited To Big Block Party

The 3 restaurants — one Japanese-inspired, another featuring tacos, the third specializing in meatballs — could not be more different.

But OKO, Bartaco and The Meatball Shop have already joined forces with valet parking. This Sunday (October 6), they’re collaborating on a family afternoon — for a great cause.

National Hall is the site of the 1st-ever Push Against Cancer Block Party. From 2 to 5 p.m. there’ s appetizers from all 3 spots, drinks courtesy of TUCK Gin, and fun activities like Cornhole and an obstacle course for kids and adults, thanks to Upper Deck Fitness.

National Hall and Upper Deck Fitness: the site of Sunday’s block party.

It all benefits the Hole in the Wall Gang Camps — the wonderful site in Ashford, Connecticut for children with life-threatening illnesses founded by Westport’s own Paul Newman.

OKO chef/owner Brian Lewis participated in this spring’s Push Against Cancer push-up contest at Staples High School — also a Hole in the Wall Gang fundraiser. He was so moved by what he learned that he offered OKO — or his other restaurant, The Cottage — for a future event.

PAC organizers Andy Berman and Sherry Jonas were happy to oblige.

Bartaco, The Meatball Shop, Upper Deck Fitness and National Hall’s landlord were equally eager to join in.

There’s a lot going on in Westport this weekend. But if you can, block out time for this great block party.

And yes, there’s plenty of parking.

(Tickets will he sold at the “door.” The cost is $40 per adult, $10 per child under age 12.)

Newest Menu Item: Valet Parking

Bartaco, OKO and the newly opened Meatball Shop are 3 very different restaurants.

But they share 2 things: popularity and parking.

The Mexican, Japanese and Italian-American spots are packed, for lunch and dinner. The National Hall and nearby parking lots are often full — especially during the day, when spots are reserved for employees of nearby offices.

There’s a parking deck across the street. But for various reasons — some people don’t like driving up the narrow ramp; crossing Wilton Road can be dicey; others may not even know it’s there — that option is underutilized.

The other day, representatives of the 3 restaurants sat together. Instantly, they agreed on a solution: valet parking.

The old Vigilant Firehouse on Wilton Road is now OKO restaurant. The Meatball Shop is behind is on the right; Bartaco is behind on the left. (Photo/Dan Woog)

Working together — and with the blessing of the new owner of the entire complex — they hired We Park, a Wilton-based firm.

Just as quickly, the service began. Valet parking is available 7 days a week, for lunch and dinner.

You don’t have to tell the valet what restaurant you’re going to. In fact, you don’t have to eat at all. The service is there if you just want to stroll along the boardwalk, admiring the river and lights.

A beautiful boardwalk connects OKO, The Meatball Shop and Bartaco. (Photo by Anne Hardy)

“We’re all in this together,” says Brian Lewis, owner of OKO. “We want everyone who comes here to feel our hospitality. We all have the same goals: to take care of our guests. Whatever brings people here is good for all of us.”

He says that — like the other owners — he appreciates (and dines at) the nearby restaurants.

The owners appreciate too the receptiveness of the new National Hall owners. They’ve already repainted the lines in the parking lot, and added directional signs.

Coming soon: More signs for the valet service.

Though probably not in Spanish, Japanese or Italian.

Chef Brian Lewis Flays Competition

There’s always something going on at Wakeman Town Farm.

Last night, for example, Tim’s Kitchen was the site of an intimate chefs’ dinner.

Brian Lewis — chef/owner of the wildly popular Cottage and OKO — hosted the event, as part of a sold-out series.

What the guests didn’t know is that one of the dishes on the menu — English pea sachetti with robiola cheese, lemon brown butter and sage crumbs — was the same one Lewis had cooked when he taped “Beat Bobby Flay.”

Brian Lewis, cooking last night at Wakeman Town Farm …

And the episode aired that very night.

So as guests enjoyed their great meal, the rest of America was watching Chef Lewis go head to head with Bobby Flay.

Dessert included viewing the competition on TV.

The icing on the cake: Lewis won!

… and on TV.

“06880” is pleased to pass on this very tasty tidbit.

(Hat tip: Christy Colasurdo)

Times Critic LOVES The Cottage

To earn an “excellent” review from New York Times critic Patricia Brooks, a restaurant basically has to be perfect. That means a spectacular menu, an uber-creative chef, flawless presentation and service. The bathrooms should probably be beautiful too.

But Brooks has just given an exceptionally rare “excellent” rating to The Cottage.

In tomorrow’s New York Times, she raves that the “small, cozy and very homey” Colonial Green eatery — the successor to Le Farm — boasts a menu “far more sophisticated than its simple setting would suggest.”

Brooks and her companions did not have “any disappointments, at either dinner or brunch.”

A cozy table, at The Cottage.

A cozy table, at The Cottage.

She says there were “too many high points at dinner to mention” — perhaps the highest praise she has given any restaurant.

“There were so many appealing choices, and too little time,” Brooks laments. She adores — among chef/owner Brian Lewis’ dishes — appetizers like crunchy tuna, Chioggia beets and Maine sea scallops; house-made pastas; cod and salmon entrees, and 4 “resoundingly ambrosial” desserts.

When Patricia Brooks gives a “very good” rating, restaurateurs can be set for life.

With this “excellent” review, you should call now — the day before the Times lands on your doorstep — for reservations. Otherwise, you’ll have to wait about as long you do for “Hamilton” tickets.

(Click here to read Patricia Brooks’ full story. Hat tip: John Karrel)