Tag Archives: Jimmy Izzo

Joe Italiano: An Ace Retires

Sure, you can get a snow shovel, light bulb or roach motel on the internet.

But you can’t get it immediately — right now, the moment you need it.

You can’t handle the merchandise, to choose  exactly the right product.

You can’t get the expert advice — and no up-selling — from knowledgeable, friendly folks you find at your local hardware store.

That’s why so many Westporters flock to Crossroads Ace Hardware.

Ace is the place for all that — plus the old-fashioned, all-that’s-missing-is-the-pot-bellied-stove atmosphere, courtesy of owner Jimmy Izzo and his dad, AJ.

For nearly 30 years, Joe Italiano has made Crossroads Hardware special too. But January 28 is his last day in the small-but-crammed-to-the-gills store that’s as beloved as its strip mall neighbor, Coffee An’.

Joe Italiano

Joe Italiano

Crossroads is Joe’s last stop, in a long career in the business. The Westchester native worked in Ridgefield and Danbury before Paul Taylor — owner of Weston Hardware, where he worked in the 1960s — told AJ to call Joe for his new store, on the site of the old North Main Garage.

Crossroads Ace Hardware opened in October 1989. Joe’s been there all that time.

In fact, very quietly — but with insights gained from decades of experience — he’s helped make it what it is.

Joe prefers to talk about what he’s gotten out of the place.

“Over the years I’ve been fortunate to meet and work with a lot of nice people,” he says. “The customers are great, and AJ and Jimmy treated me better than well.”

He’s done everything from make keys — you can’t do that on the internet — to repair a completely shattered antique glass lamp.

Customer service is important to the Izzos — and to Joe. “We try our best to give them what they ask for,” he says. “We won’t do a job if we can’t do it right, and reasonably.”

Some customers, of course, think that “reasonably” means “almost free.”

“It costs us to keep merchandise on the shelves,” Joe notes. “On the internet, they have a big warehouse and they shove it in boxes, then out the door.”

But if customers keep going to the internet, he adds, “we won’t be here to serve the public.”

Crossroads Ace Hardware, where customer service -- and Joe Italiano -- are kings.

Crossroads Ace Hardware is a favorite Westport place.

Retirement will give Joe time to catch up on projects he’s got at home; spend time with his wife, who retired 2 years ago, and travel. He looks forward to attending his grandkids’ functions on Saturdays — something he’s never been able to do.

He’ll miss the “interaction with all the people.” He will not miss driving between work and home — Danbury, on the New Fairfield line – in snow.

Meanwhile, thousands of loyal customers will miss Joe Italiano. Ace will still be the place.

It just won’t be the same without him.

An Ace Customer At Crossroads Hardware

If you’ve lived in Westport for more than 12 seconds, you know that Crossroads Ace Hardware is the place — for any home-related item you could imagine, for fantastic personal service, and for that sit-around-the-potbelly-stove community feeling you can’t get anywhere else.

Ace HardwareIf you don’t know and love Jimmy Izzo, his father AJ and the rest of the Ace crew, you should crawl back into your cave.

But if you’re like me, you’ve probably driven by at night after they’ve closed and thought, “Wow, they leave a lot of stuff outside. They must really trust people.”

They do. And here’s why.

Yesterday morning, Jimmy went to open up. Under the door, he found a handwritten slip of paper.

Overnight, a customer had helped himself to some bamboo sticks, copper pipe and plastic tomato stakes.

Jimmy Izzo - Ace Hardware

The customer listed all those items on that sheet of paper. He also slipped a check under the door for the total amount.

Plus tax.

“People are good,” Jimmy says.

Well, yeah. Because, Jimmy, you’re good to them.

Minute Man 2.0

What can be better than Westport’s Minute Man, down by the beach?

How about a 2nd Minute Man — this one downtown?

Church Lane - 2 - Jimmy Izzo

Jimmy Izzo — the Mayor of Main Street — caught an artist in action yesterday. He was decorating the construction fence in front of the old YMCA, part of the new Bedford Square project.

His name is Jahmane. He’s based in Norwalk, and has exhibited at the Westport Arts Center (among many other places).

Let’s hope this one is not decorated the way our Minute Man friend down at Compo sometimes is.

PS: Who says Westport is no longer an artists’ colony?

Church Lane - Jimmy Izzo

(Photos/Jimmy Izzo)

Meanwhile, in related fence-painting news, the Westport Arts Center, Westport Weston Chamber of Commerce and Westport Downtown Merchants Association are sponsoring a “Westport Paints The Town” event a week from tomorrow (Saturday, June 20, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.).

Individuals and families can have their “selfies” outlined on the wall by artists, or can paint their own artistic vision. A $10 per person fee helps cover artists and supply costs. (Professional artists will also participate.)

Tables and chairs will be set up on Church Lane, which will be closed to cars during the event. Restaurants including SoNo Baking Company, Spotted Horse and Pink Sumo will take orders curbside. And a DJ will add music to the art.

Jimmy Izzo Turns 50!

Everyone in Westport loves Jimmy Izzo. He’s a 1983 Staples grad, the owner of Crossroads Hardware, an RTM member, and an all-around great guy.

In honor of his 50th birthday — today! — alert “06880” reader/proud sister Sue Izzo offers this tribute:

Many of us have siblings we love. But I believe I have one of the most selfless, giving and amazing brothers in the world.

Jimmy Izzo, at one of his favorite spots: the Longshore golf course.

Jimmy Izzo, at one of his favorite spots: the Longshore golf course.

Jimmy is 10 years older than me. When I was obsessed with Cabbage Patch dolls, he was into Van Halen and was the bookie at Staples High School driving around in his Scirocco. Yet every night, it was my brother who put me to bed and read me a story.

As a junior in college I decided to study abroad. My brother handed me a credit card. He specifically said it was for emergencies.

Anyone who has traveled through Europe at the age of 19 knows how easy it is to find $2,000 worth of emergencies over 6 months. He just laughed it off.

But what makes my heart swell the most is the unconditional love and support Jimmy has given me through the years, as I dealt with my long journey with depression, building a business, and riding this roller coaster we call life. Having him by my side has made it all possible.

My sister and I abandoned my mom and dad. I left for the West Coast, my sister for Cape Cod. We completely broke the Italian daughter code.

My brother remained in Westport, and has been a pillar in my family’s life. How many sons do you know who not only bring lasagna or eggplant parm to their parents, but cook it from scratch?

The Izzo family -- decked out in Italy's colors.

The Izzo family — decked out in Italy’s colors. Jimmy is 2nd from right.

And have you met my father, A.J.? Not only is Jimmy his first and only son, but he works and puts up with him every day. My brother is definitely an amazing son!

I am confident in saying there is not one person who does not like my brother. He is the ultimate friend. His heart is so big, so giving, and unconditional. His door is always open. He is there to listen to a friend in need, lend a hand, and give advice when needed.

People are very lucky to have him their lives. It is rare to have such a loyal friend as Jimmy. When I come home to visit it is like walking into a bar with the mayor, though I doubt a mayor would be so well liked.

Jimmy Izzo (4th from right), and a few of his many close  friends.

Jimmy Izzo (3rd from right), and a few of his many close friends.

Two words: Ice melt. Go on Jimmy’s Facebook page to see when the latest shipment came in. Crossroads is more than a hardware store; it is the local community center. I love seeing my brother, dad and the longtime employees interacting with old and new residents.

So many times I hear my brother say, “just come down the store. We’ll take care of you.” And that is exactly what he does. That store has been in business for over 20 years. I love what it represents for our town. It is the epitome of community. And I love that my brother cares so much about Westport, its origins, and maintaining what we can of the Westport we grew up with.

So on his 50th birthday, I wish my brother Jimmy many more beautiful Compo Beach sunrises, as much laughter as possible, and a heart full of love and happiness.

I am so proud to call you my brother. I love you more than words could ever describe.

Love,
Sue

Jimmy Izzo, his mother and sisters.

Jimmy Izzo, his mother and sisters.

Red Sky At Morning…

Jimmy Izzo was up early today. He snapped this gorgeous shot at Compo Beach — gorgeous, that is, until you remember the old sailors’ saying.

Red sky - Jimmy Izzo

As Westport prepares for its 1st Snowmageddon of 2015, you should do 2 things:

  1. Go to Stop & Shop, Trader Joe’s, Fresh Market or Stew’s, to clean out the shelves in anticipation of several weeks of famine
  2. Head to Crossroads Hardware to stock up on shovels, snow blowers, roof rakes, flashlights, batteries, road salt, ice melt, and everything else you’ll need. Tell Jimmy “06880” sent you.

Jimmy Izzo: “At Compo Beach, Sometimes Less Is More”

Jimmy Izzo is a native Westporter and Staples High School graduate; the longtime owner of Crossroads Ace Hardware; a District 3 RTM member, and — importantly for the purposes of this story — a longtime Compo beachgoer. 

He notes the Parks & Recreation Commission‘s public meeting on Monday, September 29 (Town Hall auditorium, 7:30 p.m.) to hear public opinion on the proposed Compo Beach 2.0 master plan, and writes:

Many of us are passionate about our beach. This topic will continue to be debated.

There is no crime in adjusting this plan to meet the needs and wants of Westport taxpayers and beach users. The crime would be for the Compo Beach Committee, Parks & Recreation Commission and Board of Selectmen to not listen to the public.

Compo Beach: a town jewel, beloved by all.

Compo Beach: a town jewel, beloved by all.

I personally see no need to spend between $5 million and $7 million on a park venue that really doesn’t need much more than added bathrooms to the south beach; cleaner, more functioning bathrooms by the bathhouse, and a minor facelift — not a complete makeover.

First, the bathhouses. For a structure that is used only a few months out of the year, and brings in between $10,000 and $12,000 annually, I see no reason to blow it up. The history and historic meaning to our community, past and present, is reason enough to leave it alone. If the Masonic temple is good enough to be deemed historic, so should our Compo bathhouse.

The Compo Beach committee has brought up weekend traffic as being a problem, and proposed moving the entrance and creating another lane. Again, in my opinion, there is no need to blow up what already works 95% of the time the beach is being used.

Compo Beach is timeless. This photo from the 1980s could have been taken any time. (Photo/Larry Silver, courtesy of Bruce Silverstein Gallery)

Compo Beach is timeless. This photo from the 1980s could have been taken any time. (Photo/Larry Silver, courtesy of Bruce Silverstein Gallery)

Here are some options which I believe would be a better alternative than spending taxpayer money:

  • No day beach passes purchased at the gate on weekends and holidays.
  • Passes can be purchased at the Parks & Rec Department as late on Saturday at 12 p.m., or until the office closes.
  • Allow passes to be purchased online, like other Parks & Rec purchases. They can be printed out like airline tickets.
  • Create an “out of town parking area” in the middle of the beach for weekends and holidays. There is no reason prime parking spots should ever go to non-residents.
  • Post a sign by Owenoke Road laying out our “day pass policy.”

These are just suggestions. By entertaining a few of these simple steps, we alleviate Parks & Rec employees from spending unnecessary time conducting “business transactions” that take them away from other important things at the beach, like making sure our restrooms are clean, garbage is picked up, and parking lots filled accordingly. Conducting business at the gate creates traffic jams.

I commend the Compo Beach Committee for their hard work in trying to help make our beach better. We have to realize that Compo is already a really good place. Improvements must be handled with care and sensitivity, with concern for the many residents who have for generations enjoyed Compo, and appreciate its natural beauty as is.

Jared Frank captured this Compo rainbow.

It is important that, in the end, everyone is on the same page when it comes to our beach. We as a town cannot afford — financially or emotionally — not to have complete public support when it comes to proposed changes at Compo, regardless of how large or small they may be.

We don’t need another contentious situation like the Y to Mahackeno, where the wounds ran deep and the healing process was long.

Let’s not complicate simplicity, and always remember that sometimes less is more.

 

 

 

The Last Shovel

Crossroads Hardware sold its last rock salt early this morning.

By noon, only one shovel was left.

Crossroads Hardware owner Jimmy Izzo, and the last shovel.

Crossroads Hardware owner Jimmy Izzo, and the last shovel.

It’s probably gone now too.

A Valentine’s Day gift for a very special someone, no doubt.

No Batteries, But…

Jimmy Izzo — the very helpful and conscientious owner of Crossroads Ace Hardware — posted on Facebook this afternoon:

“No more “D” batteries  😦  sorry … maybe Monday.”

Just as quickly, someone responded:

“Plenty of roof rakes?”

So You Think You’re Lance Armstrong

Jimmy Izzo sees and hears everything.

Whether holding court at Crossroads Hardware (which he owns) or driving around town (which he also owns), he’s got his eyes and ears opened.

The other day Jimmy posted this on Facebook:

Almost hit another 2 “Lance Armstrong wannabes” this morning on their bikes.  These arrogant idiots who seem to make up their own rules of the road are without a doubt on a suicide mission.

Cyclists blowing through red lights and stop signs is a practice that needs to be stopped.  Tickets and fines should be given, just as they are to motor vehicles.

Jimmy didn’t hit any cyclists — but he struck a chord.

Comments poured in:

  • I totally agree…riding in the middle of the road…not looking crossing intersections.
  • By law, they are supposed to obey the same laws of the road.  I was avoiding 2 octogenarians on bikes one day.  They rolled through a stop sign.  I was working NOT to pass them.  And who gets the $124 ticket?
  • I actually had a biker hit ME at Minute Men Cleaners.  My baby was sleeping in the back seat, my mom was with me.  And he started yelling at ME about his $3K bike and how I would have to replace it.
  • Weston concurs!  Stay to the side; ride single file!
  • There really should be a campaign about it, because Westport has made the effort to put in bike lanes around a lot of the town.  Single file is right!  Ride with traffic!
  • I ride all the time, and stay as far to the edge of the road as possible.  I never ride side by side with anyone.  The police need to start ticketing the riders who obstruct the roadways.
  • Saugatuck Avenue is loaded with these pains-in-the-asses.  Every Sunday morning they are out there yelling their messages to each other, waking the rest of us up.
  • Sounds like someone should bring this up at a Westport town meeting.  I don’t know what this would fall under, but I bet it would pass unanimously.

And if it does — though nothing, not even a request for world peace, would pass unanimously here — I’ve got the next issue:

The logo-plastered Spandex that bicyclists feel compelled to wear.  If they really want to pretend they’re Lance Armstrong, do it the right way.

Take performance-enhancing drugs.

I'm cool. And I'll mow you down.