Tag Archives: Heather Bauer

COVID-19 Roundup: Property Tax Info; Ringing Bells; Harrowing Survival Story; Online Fitness And Yoga; Free Resumes; More

Several readers have wondered about Westport real estate and personal property tax abatement or deferral (they’re due today — April 1. No fooling). I asked 1st Selectman Jim Marpe. He says:

For several weeks, our town (and others) have been exploring deferment alternatives for property owners who can demonstrate genuine hardship. This is still a work in process.

Among other things, the governor must take executive order steps to allow a local community the option to modify property tax payment penalties and deadlines. I have been in direct touch with Governor Lamont on this issue. In the meantime the April 1 quarterly tax payment date still remains, but as always, allows 30 days (until May 1) to pay without penalty.

I have not heard if utility companies plan to offer any special dispensation for hardship cases. Our Human Services Department regularly works with residents on utility payment plans if true need can be demonstrated.

In related news, Governor Lamont announced yesterday a 90-day grace period on mortgage payments, and a 60-day delay on foreclosures. Homeowners should contact their banks and/or mortgage companies for details.


Across the country, communities are coming together to ring bells in support of medical personnel and other frontline workers.

From 5:00 to 5:02 p.m. tonight, Westport families are asked to “joyously sound a bell, chime, bang pans, etc. as a reminder that while we may be physically separated, we remain united. Let’s make this a gesture of gratitude to all the people helping us overcome this present situation: the police department, fire department, first responders, town officials, teachers and healthcare workers, including the many Westport parents who leave their families to care for those in need at hospitals and medical offices.”

Greens Farms and Assumption Churches — and perhaps others — will join in. Ring them bells! (Hat tips: Jaclyn Lindsey-Noble and Staples High School PTA)

In addition, reader Mary Beth Stirling urges Westporters to fly the American flag. That — and donations to any organization that helps those in need — are both a show of support, and a way to teach children that whatever they can do (including staying home to protect lives) is a patriotic act.

Green’s Farms Congregational Church has a great bell to ring.


“06880” readers know Heather Bauer for her tips on eating healthy in restaurants.

Now the rest of America knows her as a COVID-19 survivor. The 42-year-old nutritionist/mother of 3/ runner of 15 marathons was in great health — until she attended a party, and got infected.

Two days ago — just a week after leaving Yale New Haven Hospital, where she spent 9 harrowing days — Heather told her story on CNN.

It’s a scary tale of fever, migraine headaches, a full body rash, even possible meningitis. It’s also a tale of great care, by a wonderful medical staff. Click below to watch. (Hat tip: Ben Sturner)


Patty Kondub’s great water aerobics classes have been beached by the coronavirus. So have dozens of other Westport Weston Family YMCA offerings, in strength training, yoga — you name it.

But members can still get exercise — on land, at home. There are offerings for all ages, in every imaginable category. Click here for info.

PS: Yesterday, I (coincidentally) got a call from the Y. They were just checking in on all members — seeing how we are, and what we need.

I really need to swim. But failing that, I’d like to say this: THANKS, Y! What a nice, friendly, community touch!

A motivational message from Patty Kondub.


Speaking of exercise, Kaia Yoga’s classes are now all online. Many are inexpensive. There are also free kids’ classes and meditations — great for parents looking for productive activities.

Kaia Yoga — which has long provided classes for Bridgeport school children –has been hit hard by the coronavirus. They employ over 70 teachers.

Click here for a list of classes.


Speaking (again) of exercise, does anyone have an unused stationary bike they’re willing to sell? Asking for (ahem) a friend.


Every Westporter has a talent. Many are figuring out how to use their expertise to help others.

As a career coach, Jaki Suter helps clients write or refresh resumes. With so many people suddenly facing job losses, she’s doing her part: offering a “free resume refresh” to 30 Westport and Weston residents.

She’ll work with you to highlight skills and accomplishments; include new positions and details, and eliminate irrelevant details.

All you need is an existing resume no more than 5 years old. You’ll work by phone. Jaki will produce an updated resume, including a round of revisions and a final document.

To be one of the first 30 local residents, email jaki@sutergroup.com (subject line: “Free Resume Refresh”).


Jennifer Hrbek reports that she and Westport psychiatrist Dr. Mohamed Elsamra are helping raise $50,000 to buy 4 ventilators, to be donated to local hospitals. Click here to contribute.


Public Works director Peter Ratkiewich notes that transfer station personnel cannot assist with bulky waste. Do not bring those items to the station.

In addition, with the increase in cardboard due to online ordering, all boxes should be flattened, stacked and tied.

Tissues and gloves are being placed in recycling bins. They are not recyclable, and must be placed in the regular trash bin.

Due to the increased amount of glass containers, recycling bins are too heavy for workers to lift. For the time being, residents should separate glass into a smaller container, or put all recycling in smaller containers so workers can lift them.

Transfer station


Greens Farms Academy head of school Bob Whelan has gained fame — and respect — for his great snow day videos.

It’s a little tougher to pull off a clever coronavirus video. But the popular, people-first educator did.

This morning he channeled Fred Rogers, for the school’s youngest learners. Bob —  whose career before education was fronting the band Angry Salad — sang for his students.

He reminded them he (and the school) were still there for them. Then, in true Mr. Rogers fashion he asked them to keep him apprised of big events, like birthdays and lost teeth.

You don’t have to be a kid — or go to GFA — to love this one.


Miriam Young writes, “As one of many COVID positive people in Westport, I hope you can tell other positive readers about efforts to collect plasma from recovered patients.”

She sent a link to a story on how plasma might help people still fighting off infection (or, preemptively, those at high risk of infection).


When Westporter John Rizzi read that a TV remote can be 20 times dirtier than your toilet, he got worried. You can’t clean it well, without taking it all apart.

But he devised a solution: cover it in plastic wrap. It takes 2 seconds; it protects the device — and you can replace the wrap over and over again.


And finally, you don’t have to be a Kopite to love this song (and video!):

Menu Moments: What To Eat At Tarantino

With Mario’s gone, Tarantino is the train station’s go-to restaurant. It’s worthy of its Saugatuck location: They grow their own olives in Italy, to bottle their own oil. (But this is 2020. They also offer gluten-free and whole wheat pasta.)

Here are some healthy dining picks at the Railroad Place favorite, from Westport-based nutritionist Heather Bauer.

Vegetarians

Appetizers

  • Di barbabietola (beet/goat cheese salad)
  • Tricolore salad

Entrees

  • Caprese di bufala (buffalo mozzarella and tomato)
  • Grilled eggplant parmesan (not breaded). NOTE: This is not on the menu, but they will make it upon special request.

Sides:

  • Add broccoli rabe, wild mushrooms or spinach with either entree

Tarantino, across from the train station.

Fish Lovers

Appetizers

  • Di barbabietola (beet/goat cheese salad)
  • Tricolore salad

Entrees

Note: If you are sharing a few appetizers and want a lighter dinner, consider choosing a second appetizer for dinner with a side vegetable.

  • Grilled calamari
  • Octopus carpaccio with arugula
  • Tuna tartare
  • Plain grilled salmon with your choice of veggies on the side
  • Swordfish (ask for sauce on the side)
  • Zuppa Di Aragosta (the mussels take time to get through, but they’re worth it)

Carnivores

Appetizers

  • Caesar salad (no croutons; ask for dressing on the side)
  • Tricolore salad
  • Caprese

Entrees

  • Beef carpaccio plus 1-2 shared side veggies
  • Pollo Margherita (request without brandy cream sauce)
  • Veal Milanese (ask for this grilled, not breaded)

Menu Moments: What To Eat At Kawa Ni

Kawa Ni (Japanese for “on the river”) is an Asian-inspired establishment. They serve a wide array of drinks and food in a cozy interior. It’s a casual setting for an after-work get-together with co-workers, or a destination for friends and family.

Though a Japanese-style restaurant, chef/owner Bill Taibe, and his brother and fellow chef Jeff Taibe, draw inspiration from other Asian cuisines (notably Vietnamese, Chinese and Korean).

As a nod to the Japanese-style pub called “izakaya,” Kawa Ni specializes in many small plates, a few one-dish entree portions with rice or noodles, and an impressive variety of sake, other alcoholic beverages and teas. Westport-based nutritionist, Heather Bauer serves up her top healthy picks below.

Bill Taibe (right) and his Kawa Ni staff.

Heather’s Tips

Kawa Ni does not do special requests (except for edamame), so plan your day around dinner; eat clean at breakfast and lunch. Be sure to drink your daily water allotment by 3 p.m., to help your body handle the extra sodium at dinner.

Kimchi — a traditional Korean food made from fermented cabbage — is served as a condiment or on the side. Since it’s fermented, this food helps improve gut bacteria, lowers cholesterol, boosts your immune system, reduces inflammation, and has antibacterial properties.

Pickled kelp is another highly nutritious Asian food rich in vitamins K and A, iodine, calcium, iron and more.

Appetizers

  • Share edamame (request butter on side) and shishito
  • Choose one appetizer (green papaya salad) for yourself.

Entrees

  • Hamachi ochazuke
    • Sliced raw fish over chilled yuzu dashi (no carbs)
  • Kani crab salad
    • While this hass a mayo base, it’s not a carb. Plus it’s so good!
  • Hamachi sashimi appetizer.

Add side veggies to an entree:

  • Tsukemono (pickled vegetables, kimchi)
  • Shaved broccoli miso goma
  • Pickled kelp.

Menu Moments: What To Eat At Tutti’s

If you haven’t been to Tutti’s, then you’re not a real Westporter.

There’s more than just great Italian food at this Saugatuck staple, steps from the train station.

As soon as you walk in, Tutti’s wants you to feel like you’re part of the family.

Tutti’s parking lot is filled during the Slice of Saugatuck. The restaurant is an important part of the neighborhood.

Which makes sense: It’s a family-run business. Owner and head chef Pasquale Funicello is responsible for Tutti’s homestyle cooking.

Pasquale was born in Salerno, and was introduced to the kitchen at age 10. He graduated from the Culinary Institute of Sorrento in 1972. He has been cooking delicious Italian meals in the Westport area almost since then.

Pasquale and his wife Maria — who  runs the front line with warmth and a smile — were the original owners of Angelina’s Trattoria in Westport, back in the 1980s.

Tutti’s owners Pasquale and Maria Funicello.

Tutti’s motto is “Good food, good friends” — and they live it daily.

Tutti’s happily accommodates special requests, and will make any entree gluten-free. They just want you to enjoy your meal.

Westport-based nutritionist Heather Bauer serves up her top healthy picks — of all types — below.

Heather’s Tips

Italian food is traditionally high in carbohydrates, so if you’re trying to lose weight it’s best to skip the bread, pizza and pasta dishes.

However, if you’re on maintenance you can add 1 to 2 slices of pizza, or share a pasta dish as your appetizer in addition to one of my recommendations below. Use this meal as your carb for the day, so avoid a carb serving at breakfast or lunch.

I also recommend avoiding creamy sauces, and choosing white wine or garlic- based sauces instead. Based on my eating plan, the red sauce will count as your carb, so choose piccata, cacciatore or marsala sauce.

However, if you want to have a little pasta and are in the weight loss phase, have pasta fagioli soup. It’s quite filling, and can satisfy your cravings.

One of the many delicious dishes at Tutti’s.

Appetizers 

  • Pasta fagioli soup
  • Small Caesar salad
    • This has an amazing homemade dressing, but request it on the side.
    • Keep the anchovies for an added boost of omega-3s.
  • House salad
    • If ordering for 1 person, choose the small size.
  • House salad with portobello and asparagus
    • Vegetarians: Order a large for your entree, and have the pasta fagioli or caprese as an appetizer.
  • Italian chopped salad

Appetizers to share:

Order your own house salad and share any of these:

  • Caprese
  • Cold antipasto
  • Prosciutto, red peppers and mozzarella
  • Prosciutto, artichoke and mozzarella

Tutti’s Caprese salad

Healthy Entrees

*For all entrees, request double veggies and skip the pasta

  • Any salad recommendation above can be ordered in the large size for entree. Add grilled chicken, grilled salmon (my favorite), grilled steak, shrimp or scallops.
    • Example: order the large Caesar salad with grilled salmon.
  • Chicken scallopini
    • The piccata style is a healthier option.
    • Order without butter.
  • Chicken parm
    • Order grilled and without breading.
  • Eggplant parmesan
    • Order grilled and without breading.
  • Grilled salmon with spinach
    • Request pesto sauce on the side.
  • Stuffed tomato (grilled chicken with veggies)
    • This is from the lunch menu; it’s more popular in the summer months.
  • Zuppa di Pesce
    • This is a filling entree that takes time to eat.

Side Veggies to Share:

  • Sauteed broccoli rabe
  • Sauteed spinach

Gluten-Free Options:
Any entree can be made gluten-free.

  • Pizza

Menu Moments: What To Eat At Little Barn

If you want rustic-chic, American-style food, search no further than Little Barn. With delicious food, great drinks and lively entertainment — all in a barn-like building, served by friendly staff — Little Barn has a special charm.

From lobster mac n’ cheese to a Tuscan kale salad, they offer a wide selection of food for everyone, including vegetarians, vegans, and those on a gluten-free diet.

Enter here for the Little Barn.

Westport-based nutritionist Heather Bauer serves up her top healthy picks for Little Barn.

NOTE: Because the portions are so generous, all starters can be shared.

For Vegetarians

Appetizers

  • The Tuscan kale salad is the perfect way to start your meal. To lighten things up, order it without cranberries and pecans.
  • More traditional? Go for the fork-and-knife Caesar (without the croutons, and with a vinaigrette dressing instead).

Entree

  • Dig into the Shrooms or another veggie burger; request any salad on the side. To reduce carbohydrates, take off the top bun and eat your burger “topless.”

For Pescatarians

Appetizers 

Pair up with your partner and share one of the following:

  • Tuna blocks
  • Brussels and chorizo
  • Tuna tacos wrapped in lettuce.

Entrees

  • Brussel sprouts salad with grilled salmon or tuna on top
  • Fork-and-knife Caesar salad without the croutons; dressing on the side; add salmon or tuna
  • Tuscan kale salad with either cranberries or pecans; add salmon or tuna
  • Tuna tacos.

Shaved Brussels sprouts salad.

For Carnivores

Appetizers

  • Beef or pork taco wrapped in lettuce
  • Fork-and-knife Caesar without the croutons, but with vinaigrette (ask for dressing on the side).

Entrees

  • Cobb Salad (skip blue cheese). with the option to add steak over grilled chicken
  • Any Brussels sprouts salad with grilled chicken or steak
  • Tuscan kale salad with either cranberries or pecans, with grilled chicken or steak
  • The DQ burger without the bun — or eat it “topless” with a side salad.

Heather’s Tips

Because this restaurant is so laid back, you can add up your special requests as long as you are with good family or friends. In this casual atmosphere the entire table shares a few appetizers; then everyone each chooses their own entrees.

If your table is sharing appetizers you can’t really make special requests, but you can try to add in an appetizer (like the ones noted below) for a healthier option.

But if your appetizer feels “heavier” to you and you already had protein in your appetizer, go for one of the salad recommendations sans protein.

Keep the “3/4 rule” in mind: Since food can be heavier at a restaurant than at home, eat 3/4 of your meal; leave ¼ to take home for lunch the next day.

However, remember that fat and flavor are important in satiety and staying healthy. When you deprive your body of too much fat and flavor, you end up craving less healthy food. So be mindful of what and how much you’re eating, while still enjoying things that sound good to you.

Menu Moments: What To Eat At Planet Pizza

Planet Pizza is a favorite spot, in this pizza-crazed town.

Founders Joe, Mike and Frank Rocco grew up in 1970s Bronx, as children of Italian immigrants.

Each day the pizza dough is made in their 8 stores, using a generational recipe from flour milled from Kansas spring wheat and a Hobart mixer. They also make their own pizza sauce.

You can definitely eat healthy at a pizzeria. Westport-based nutritionist Heather Bauer serves up her top picks below.

Heather’s Tips:

When looking at an Italian menu, check out the salads and entrees before ordering pizza.

Depending on your goal — weight loss or maintenance — you should determine the number of healthy carb servings per day.

Examples of healthy carbs include sweet potato, brown rice, sushi roll, beans, corn, peas, chickpeas and condiments that are sweet.

Many people lose weight with one healthy carb a day. Those trying to maintain their weight can build in an indulgence like pizza, and count that as their carb. Each slice of cheese pizza counts as 1 carb.

Planet Pizza is extremely accommodating to diet needs. They have amazing salads, and a special healthy section on their menu.

Pizza Lovers

Planet Pizza has cauliflower pizza crust as an option. It is gluten- and dairy-free. With cauliflower crust, order salad pizza or regular cheese pizza, then add veggies of your choice.

If you choose 1 slice of cheese pizza, enjoy your 1 carb for the day. They do have gluten-free and thin crust whole wheat options. Add mushrooms, broccoli, tomatoes and peppers — all are great for veggies. Add a small garden salad with grilled chicken on the side if you go this route.

Planet Pizza’s gluten-free option.

Salad pizza (cheeseless pizza topped with salad) is also good.

Avoid: Extra toppings such as pepperoni, meats and extra cheese. Also avoid eggplant parm and chicken parm (too much salt, fat, carbs and calories).

Entree Salads

If you order a salad for a meal, choose the large size. There are tons of additional topping options, from avocado to hard-boiled eggs. You can add grilled chicken, grilled shrimp or grilled steak to any salad as well.

Goat cheese and portobello mushroom salad is a good vegetarian option.

For the Greek salad (choose feta or olives), add grilled chicken.

For the Compo salad, choose candied walnuts or cranberries. Both are sweet, so choose only one. Feta and goat cheese are lighter options than blue cheese. Add grilled shrimp or chicken.

Entrees

The Healthy Special section on the menu includes

Grilled chicken with your choice of spinach, broccoli rabe or broccoli (you can request the veggies be steamed).

Chicken bruschetta: grilled chicken with marinated chopped tomatoes, onions and basil. (No bread, of course.)

Side dishes include broccoli rabe, broccoli or spinach (steamed our sauteed).

Menu Moments: What To Eat At The Whelk

The Whelk is a gem on Westport’s restaurant scene.

Fortunately, the Saugatuck spot’s tasty farm-to-table menu — specializing in seafood — does not make healthy choices seem like a sacrifice.

Chef/owner Bill Taibe has created a special dining experience. He is committed to locally sourced food, through farmers and oystermen.

As with all of Taibe’s restaurants, a “kitchen share” program enables them to increase wages for their hard-working kitchen help. That’s one more reason to feel good at The Whelk.

The Whelk (Photo courtesy of Our Town Crier)

This is not a place to make special requests. Enjoy your food the way it was meant to be prepared.

Also, the menu changes along with the seasons. What you see here is on the menu today. In a few weeks, it may not be.

The best strategy is to steer clear of bread, shoestring fries, pasta dishes and (of course, unfortunately) dessert.

Whether you’re a vegan, vegetarian, pescatarian or meat eater, you can’t go wrong with this impressive menu. Westport nutritionist Heather Bauer serves up her healthiest picks below.

For Vegetarians

Appetizer:

  • The gem lettuce salad is perfect for both vegans and vegetarians alike
  • The radicchio salad (if you’re okay with a little Parmesan cheese, which is relatively high in protein and low in fat)
  • The snap peas and feta salad is also a great choice.

Entree: Choose a veggie option. Current favorites:

  • Roasted squash and runner beans
  • Burrata (leave half the toast)

For Pescatarians

Appetizer:

  • Share the raw bar, ideally enjoying a half dozen oysters or littlenecks. Oysters are high in zinc, which boosts immunity
  • Any of the vegetarian salad recommendations

At The Whelk.

Entree:

  • Pair the radicchio, gem lettuce or snap pea and feta salad with either the king salmon crudo or scallop crudo.
  • Halibut
  • Cod

For Meat Eaters

Appetizer:

  • Any of the salad options above
  • Alternatively, order the raw bar

Entree:

  • Roasted Chicken is a great option (leaving some of the skin makes it a little healthier). Eat all of the squash; leave some polenta on your plate.
  • The burger. Just leave the bun!

  • Heather’s Tips

    Make sure you drink 8 cups of water every day, especially when you plan on having a rich dinner. Water helps your body process a heavier meal.

    When you get home, don’t blow it by having a second dinner! Instead, get ready for bed and call it a night.

    Fat and flavor are important in satiety and staying healthy. When you deprive your body of too much fat and delicious flavor, you end up craving less healthy food.

 

Menu Moments: What To Eat At Little Kitchen

Little Kitchen — the fast, tasty pan-Asian restaurant in Compo Shopping Center — has been around more than 2 decades. (It started in an actual “little kitchen” — the old Soup’s On — on Main Street.)

Nearly every item is made in house. Cuisine includes Thai, Japanese and Chinese. In the latest installment of our continuing series, Westport nutritionist Heather Bauer serves up her top healthy picks for the popular spot.

Healthy choice appetizers

  • Small hot-and-sour (100 calories per cup), egg-drop soup (66 calories per cup) or Thai tom yum soup. NOTE: Soups are high in sodium, so if you’re salt-sensitive, pay attention.
  • 1-2 spare ribs (no more than that! — they’re 80 to 100 calories per rib). Enjoy, then pair with one of the steamed recommendations below.
  • Because Little Kitchen has a fusion menu, you can also order a house salad or edamame. Both are very healthy appetizer options.

Healthy choice entrees

  • Any dish with a steamed protein and veggies. Ask for sauce on the side; no cornstarch. Shrimp and veggies with sauce on the side is one of my favorites.
  • Moo shu chicken. If you order this steamed, mix in a little Hoisin sauce, and add light soy sauce. Request lettuce wraps instead of regular wraps if you do not order it steamed. If you ordered hot and sour soup as your appetizer, this also works as a nice sauce on the steamed moo shoo.
  • Moo goo gai pan. To order a dish that is not steamed, this is a great option. It comes with stir-fried chicken, mushrooms and lots of other veggies, but is lighter on the sauce.
  • Chicken lettuce wraps (on the menu under Appetizers): chicken, lettuce, protein/veggies, perfection. This is another top choice for a non-steamed option. Remember, no rice or other carbs in the meal; the sauce is the carb.
  • Sauteed asparagus with chicken or shrimp. Request sauce on the side; you can ask for this to be steamed.

Moo goo gai pan

Healthy sides

  • Order extra side of steamed bok choy or any steamed veggies to help fill you up.

Sushi

  • Appetizer: house salad, seaweed salad or edamame.
  • Entree: 1 naruto roll (yellowtail, salmon, tuna wrapped in cucumber) and 4-6 pieces of sashimi (ask for light soy sauce; at home, use coconut secret sauce).

Skips

  • Avoid sweet-and-sour protein choices; they are often deep-fried. Avoid egg rolls and crunchy noodles, and skip the sesame/General Tso’s/lo mein options.
  • Watch out for eggplant dishes. They seem innocent, but the eggplant acts like a sponge and absorbs way more oil than you would expect. Skip all Szechuan-style dishes; they’re cooked in a lot of oil at a very high temperature.

Additional tips, notes and tricks

  • Eat with chopsticks. It slows you down.
  • When ordering with a group, request one steamed dish.
  • Skip the rice/noodle dishes; the sauces will count as your carb.
  • When eating family-style, fill your plate with 50-75% veggies, and the rest protein. If you need to fill your plate for seconds, try to stick to only vegetables.
  • In general, order sauce on the side. Mix in the sauce served with low-sodium soy sauce.
  • If you order in, keep good condiments at home: sriracha and Coconut Secret coconut amino soy sauce as a replacement instead of soy sauce.
  • Brown or white rice? Remember that when you order dishes that come with the sauce in it, often the sauce is made with sugar and corn starch — so you don’t need the sauce and the rice. But if you choose a steamed dish and want to eat the rice, both have 200 or so calories per cup. However, brown rice has triple the fiber (about 3.5 grams per cup) and a lower glycemic index than white, meaning it takes more time to digest and will stick with you longer.
  • Try to drink 2 liters of water by 3 p.m. on days when you go out for Chinese. Your body will handle the sodium more easily.

Naruto roll

Menu Moments: What To Eat At Le Penguin

Le Penguin is a perfect spot for date night, dinner with friends, and adult birthday parties (gotta love the giant stuffed penguins and party music).

If you’re willing to forgo the bread basket, a healthy meal is surprisingly easy to put together right from the menu. In the latest installment of our continuing series, Westport nutritionist Heather Bauer serves up her top healthy picks for the popular Sconset Square spot.

Enjoy a warm welcome — and plenty of healthy options — at Le Penguin.

Healthy choice appetizers

  • Fresh baby artichoke salad (vegan)
  • Tuna tartare
  • Appetizer mussels in white wine
  • Boston Bibb salad (vegan)

Healthy choice entrees

  • Grilled salmon
  • Red snapper
  • Grass-fed grilled filet mignon (request no potatoes, sauce on the side, and all veggies instead of potatoes)
  • Entree portion of mussels in white wine (request veggies or salad instead of fries)
  • Appetizer beef carpaccio
  • NOTE: Chicken paillard lightly breaded with panko crust over arugula and parm: This is not on the menu, but it’s one of my favorite entrees at Le Penguin. The chicken is very thin, topped with a ton of arugula and freshly shaved parmesan.

Menu Moments: What To Eat At Sherwood Diner

The Sherwood Diner is legendary. Since 1977 it’s welcomed families, nearly every Staples High School student, travelers making a pit stop off I-95 — and everyone else, from early risers to night owls. (It’s also the place to go when power is out.)

“The diner” offers cozy tables, good meals at fair prices, and food that arrives in what seems like seconds. It’s also got one of the biggest, longest menus in town.

Sherwood Diner (Photo/Lynn Untermeyer Miller)

In this latest installment of our continuing series, local nutritionist Heather Bauer offers a diverse selection of healthy options.

Like eggs?

  • Go for the Eggs Benedict. Skip the sauce and English muffin; add spinach and avocado. Tip: Eggs Benedict is a great stealth choice whenever you want to be healthy without being obvious. Order as is; ask for the sauce on the side, and eat the eggs with a fork and knife. (No one will notice.)
  • Try an egg white omelet with mushrooms, spinach, asparagus and a slice of American cheese (requesting 1 slice helps control the amount of cheese in the omelet). Ask for lettuce and tomato on the side, and fresh berries instead of toast.
  • Leanest order: 2 poached eggs, side of lettuce, tomato and fresh berries, no toast.
  • Really hungry? Add a side of Canadian bacon, turkey bacon or turkey sausage.

No-egg breakfast picks

  • Organic Greek yogurt with fresh berries. This is Connecticut local whole fat yogurt, so it keeps you satiated for longer than you think.
  • Oatmeal, plus a side of fresh berries or sliced fresh fruit.

(Photo/Lynn Untermeyer Miller)

Salad Picks

  • I recommend the California salad, fresh spinach salad, mesclun salad or Village salad.
  • It’s okay to add grilled chicken, grilled salmon or roasted turkey. Vegetarians can add feta or a veggie burger as their protein.
  • Have the salad chopped for you, if you find it too much work to do at the table. Simply say, “please chop my salad for me, and leave the dressing on the side.” However, if you are fast eater, don’t go this route. Adding dressing and chopping it yourself will help slow you down.
  • Avoid more than 2 fats in a salad. Cheese, olives, roasted veggies and dressing all count as fat.
  • I recommend the lobster salad – yum! It has mayo and the portion is pretty generous though, so try to leave a little over if you can (I know it’s hard to leave lobster on your plate!). This dish comes over mixed greens, which is good.

Other good choices…

  • Broiled salmon over steamed or sauteed spinach.
  • Traditional burger, no bun, side salad (request grilled veggies on top).
  • Vegetarians: veggie burger (Morningstar Farms). And the diner now offers the Beyond Burger; order with extra grilled veggies on top, and a side salad.
  • Request house-made tzatziki on the side of any above (not pita) as a good dipping sauce