Tag Archives: Elaine Marino

Julia Marino: She’s Always Done It Her Way

Westport is justly proud of Julia Marino. Now — thanks to NBC Sports — the rest of the country knows why.

The network has given a shout-out to the Olympic snowboarder — and her family — in a widely viewed video.

She was interviewed, along with her parents John and Elaine, and sister Cece. Though her hometown was never mentioned, NBC showed clips of her riding her bike, trampolining, and at the beach.

The theme of the video was that Julia’s parents gave her a chance to take risks, dare and dream — in a “relatively safe environment.” For example, she was allowed to ride her scooter in the house (though other parents could not believe that was okay).

“She’s always done it her way,” Elaine says.

This weekend, Julia fell on her first slopestyle run. She was not alone: 41 of 50 athletes did the same. A controversy ensued over the wisdom of allowing the event to be held in high winds.

She finished 6th overall.

Next up: the big air event, next Sunday.

(Click here to see the full NBC Sports video. Hat tip: Kathie Bennewitz)

Photo Challenge #119

Last week’s photo challenge was posted the day after April Fool’s.

It was a bit of a joke — a postcard image labeled “View along Main Street, Saugatuck.” (Click here to see.)

Of course, there’s no Main Street in our Saugatuck. But there is in Saugatuck, Michigan.

Fred Cantor, Bobbie Herman, Peter Hirst, Rod Hurtuk and Mary Palmieri Gai all knew that there’s more than one Saugatuck in the world.

But wait! Elaine Marino — who seems to be Westport (Connecticut)’s foremost expert on Saugatuck, Michigan — commented that the postcard was mislabeled. She said it was actually the corner of Butler and Mason Streets. She added a few more factoids, including that the Michigan town’s founder was originally from Hartford. Yes, the Connecticut one.

Then Morley Boyd pointed out that there actually was a Main Street in our Saugatuck. It’s the same one that’s downtown today. The address was once Main Street, Saugatuck, because Westport was not named (and incorporated) until 1835.

However, we still do not have a Butler or Mason Street.

On now to this week’s photo challenge. If you know where in Westport you’d see this strange sign, click “Comments” below.

(Photo/Ed Simek)

Bridgeport Fire: You Can Still Help

Elaine Marino had a busy New Year’s Day.

After “06880” reported on her efforts to aid the 120 victims of a Bridgeport fire, she was flooded with offers to help. She scurried around Westport, picking up donations of clothes, food and toys, then headed a few miles away to deliver them.

City Council president Tom McCarthy helped her unload her jam-packed car. He said they’d been overwhelmed with clothing donations.

But there’s a lot the 50-plus families still need, including:

  • Food
  • Furniture
  • Bedding (twin, full or queen)
  • Towels
  • Utensils
  • Small appliances
  • Other items you’d need if you were starting your home over from scratch
  • Toys for the kids who lost all their  Christmas gifts
  • Cat and dog food and items
  • Gift cards to Stop & Shop, and Target.
The aftermath of the Bridgeport condominium fire. (Photo/Brian Pounds, AP)

The aftermath of the Bridgeport condominium fire. (Photo/Brian Pounds, AP)

Elaine returned home, then went off to Bed, Bath & Beyond, with 10 of those 20% off coupons.

If you’d like her to pick up items from your home tomorrow for delivery, email esmarino@msn.com.

There are other ways to help. For example, several GoFundMe pages have been set up for victims. Click here, then scroll down.

For donation drop-off information, call the Bridgeport Emergency Operations Center (203-579-3829), or the mayor’s office (Gina Malheiro or John Gomes, (203-727-4045).

Monetary donations can be send to: Red Cross, 158 Brooklawn Avenue, Bridgeport, CT 06604. The phone number is 800-319-9935.

UPDATE: Westporter Helps Bridgeport Fire Victims

A fast-moving fire yesterday morning left 120 Bridgeport condo residents homeless. The Connecticut Post calls it one of the worst temporary housing crises in state history.

More than homes were destroyed. Residents lost all their clothes and other possessions. Children lost their Christmas gifts.

Elaine Marino wants to help.

The Westport resident heads to Bridgeport later today with food and clothing. She hopes to pick up some toys along the way.

But she wants to do more.

She’s asking Westporters to place a bag of toys, clothes and/or food on their porch or front steps. Then mail your address to esmarino@msn.com. She’ll pick up your items, and deliver them to Bridgeport.

UPDATE: Elaine’s car is full today (Friday), so people should pull inside anything she has not yet picked up. She will be doing this again in Saturday morning. Please get back in touch with her by email (esmarino@msn.com).

It’s a tough  way to start 2016 for several dozen families. But it’s a good way for us — just a few miles a way — to help.

The Charles Street condominium in Bridgeport is very near the New Colony diner.

The Charles Street condominium in Bridgeport is very near the Old Colony diner.

Historic Fountain Disappears

Monday’s post about Vespa and Neat restaurants included some interesting back stories about their respective locations: National Hall and the Vigilant Firehouse. It included this photo of the intersection of the Post Road and Wilton Road.

National Hall - Riverside - Wilton Rd - early 1900s

Alert “06880” reader Jack Harder wondered: “Whatever happened to the fountain/horse trough in the middle of Wilton Road?”

That got another alert reader — Elaine Marino — thinking. A Google search led her to this photo:

Westport downtown fountain

It was taken on the boardwalk behind — yes — National Hall and the old fire station.

But a caption from October, 2013 on the website she found it on — Panoramio — reads: “This fountain is gone! I am missing this piece and it should be placed back where it was originally!”

That’s right. The fountain has vanished. Which raises 3 questions:

  • Was the fountain on the boardwalk the same trough in the early 1900s photo?
  • When and why was it removed?
  • Where is it now?

Alert readers who know — or who have memories of the fountain — should click “Comments” below.