Tag Archives: Anthropologie

Photo Challenge #314

Some Photo Challenges can be answered by anyone who has once lived in Westport. They’re permanent parts of our landscape.

Others are solvable only by those who live here now. But those bits of town will still be around for a while.

Last week’s Challenge could only be known by the latter grouop. If you haven’t seen it though, you better not wait too long.

Amy Schneider’s photo showed a beautiful butterfly. It’s hidden in plain sight — the alley behind Anthropologie, in Bedford Square — but it won’t be there forever. (Click here to see.)

The colorful charcoal work by Susan Fehlinger is part of an outdoor art project called “Vanishing Species/Vanishing Murals.” Sponsored by the Artists’ Collective of Westport, it’s one of 4 pieces that — exposed to the elements — will disappear.

Which is exactly what’s happening to so many creatures around the globe.

“The process of aging, fading and degradation speaks to the attention span of our fast-paced world, and offers its own lesson on the ephemeralness of art and life itself,” the Collective says.

Rindy Higgins, Nancy Axthelm, Lynn Untermeyer Miller, Michael Calise and Jeanne Esposito all knew exactly where to spot the lovely butterfly.

For now, at least.

This week’s Photo Challenge is a lot more permanent. And a lot less friendly.

If you know where in Westport you’d see this, click “Comments” below.

(Photo/Elaine Marino)

 

And The Holiday Window Decorating Contest Winners Are …

Only a few people can watch NFL games in person. You haven’t been to a concert in longer than it takes to conceive and deliver a baby.

But anyone could have gone around town, checked out holiday window decorations, and voted for their favorites.

In fact, many people did.

Yesterday, the Westport Downtown Merchants Association and Westport Weston Chamber of Commerce announced the winners of the annual contest. This year for the first time, it encompassed the entire town. 

And the winners are…:

Mom and Pop Shop:  The Plumed Serpent Bridal 

Plumed Serpent Bridal 

National chainAnthropologie

Anthropologie

Restaurant/Deli:  Joe’s Pizza

Joe’s Pizza

Non-retail:  Artistex Salon & Spa

Artistex Spa & Salon

And the grand prize — for the window with the most total votes: The Plumed Serpent Bridal.

They win dinner for 4 at Don Memo.

Click here for a list of all participating venues. Voting in closed — but you can still enjoy them!

Pics Of The Day #1338

The holidays on the Saugatuck River west bank …

… and at Anthropologie …

… and back on the west bank (Photos/Patricia McMahon)

Pics Of The Day #1304

“06880” photographer J.C. Martin cruised around town yesterday. Here’s what he saw:

Flags on the Ruth Steinkraus Cohen Bridge

“Tunnel Vision,” in the walkway between Main Street and Parker Harding Plaza

Sorelle Art Gallery, Bedford Square

Anthropologie prepares for the holidays (All photos/J.C. Martin)

Roundup: Staples Soccer, Library, Jim Naughton, Jose Feliciano, More


In a first for Staples High School sports — and perhaps for any team anywhere in the country — the boys soccer team broadcast last night’s match at Norwalk on a drive-in movie screen.

With a limited number of spectators allowed due to COVID at most schools — and Norwalk banning even parents — the Wreckers have livestreamed all their games this year.

GKess Films of Cheshire provide high-def quality video. WWPT-FM students provide play-by-play; alumni athletes, former coaches and other soccer aficionados add color commentary.

Cars filled with parents, siblings, younger players and random soccer fans headed to the Remarkable Theater Imperial Avenue parking lot for tailgating, and the game. They honked their horns and flashed their lights when Haydn Siroka and Alan Fiore scored early goals, and when Sebi Montoulieu saved a penalty kick.

Staples won 2-1 — their 3rd consecutive victory — and perhaps a new tradition was born.

A scene from the big screen at the Remarkable Theater. (Photo/Neil Brickley)


Good news from the Westport Library!

Starting Monday, November 9, they’ll expand hours, institute cart-side pick-up, and will offer access to the media studios, Maker Space and Children’s Department (by appointment).

New hours are Monday through Friday (10 a.m. to 6 p.m.) and Saturday (10 a.m. to 5 p.m.). The Library will remain closed on Sunday.

Patrons can browse for materials in the Library, place them on hold remotely, or do so by calling 203-291-4807. Items placed on hold can be picked up in the tent outside the building at any time during operating hours. This replaces the current curbside pick-up arrangement.

Delivery services will continue for residents who are homebound or in a high-risk category that prevents them from visiting the Library.

The Library is also adding printing services to its 3 Express computers. and will reintroduce loans from in-state Libraries.

Shopping in the Library store will continue in person or virtually by appointment. Click here to schedule.

The Library will continue to limit the number of people in the building to 100 at any time.


Tony Award-winning actor and noted director James Naughton is also a noted animal advocate. He writes:

Having lived in Weston for 43 years, and been raised in Connecticut, I count myself very lucky to have shared this wonderful, woodsy environment with nature’s creatures.

Just in the last 6 months while sequestered, we were entertained daily by a couple of foxes raising their 5 little kits in our yard, then a family of groundhogs and a raccoon family. Owls hoot in the woods , hawks circle overhead, and we watch out for fawns crossing the roads.

When some of these animals aren’t so lucky — hey are orphaned or encounter an automobile they (and we) are lucky to have a place to take them right here.

Dara and Peter Reid created Wildlife in Crisis, and have been its stewards for over 30 years.

Normally, they take in 5,000 animals a year.  This year they’ve taken in an unusually large  number of creatures–and they need our help.

They’re a 501C3, and depend on charitable contributions. Click here, and watch a 10-minute video of them releasing back into the wild some of the animals they’ve raised or  rehabilitated.

It’s inspiring, and a delight to show to your children and grandchildren. Then please: Make a donation.

Jim Naughton with a baby possum.


Speaking of famous Weston residents: This year marks the 50th anniversary of one of the most popular Christmas songs of all time. The other day, singer-songwriter Jose Feliciano popped into a Norwalk TV studio to talk with Telemundo about the jazzy, jangly classic.

Click here to see. The interview is in Spanish. But if you don’t speak it: no hay problema.

The song — and Jose’s exubertant personality — are universal.


Want $10,000?

Saturday (October 31) is the deadline to apply for a Westport Young Woman’s League Super Grant.

They’re awarded to local organizations working in areas like food insecurity, education, and health and wellness.

Despite the impact of COVID on fundraising, the WYWL continues to support our community. For a grant application, click here. To learn more, click here.


Halloween is not yet here.

But Christmas is, at Anthropologie downtown.

Can spring be far behind?

(Photo/Amy Schneider)


And finally … thanks to Jose Feliciano and Anthropologie, “06880” officially kicks off the holiday season:

Pic Of The Day #1217

Downtown Westport (Photo/Lauri Weiser)

Westport Reopens: The View From Vogue

Nina Sankovitch is a talented researcher and gifted writer. Her most recent book — American Rebels: How the Hancock, Adams, and Quincy Families Fanned the Flames of Revolution — is a deep dive into our nation’s fascinating 18th-century founding.

She is also a keen observer of her longtime home town, 21st-century style.

Yesterday, Vogue Daily published her “Letter From Westport: Together Again, But Still at a Distance.”

Sankovitch headed downtown on Friday, the first day many stores were allowed to reopen.

Nina Sankovitch

The doors to Anthropologie were open; she did not venture in. She chatted with bespoke clothier Stephen Kempson — outside.

And she checked out Mitchells, where “a deluxe hand-sanitizing-and-mask-station welcomed shoppers.” A host of store personnel greeted her with what she “assumed to be smiles behind their masks.”

Three days later — Memorial Day — brought more shoppers to Main Street, Sankovitch writes.

But, she wonders, “is a new shirt worth putting on a face mask for?”

And, she concludes:

Compo Beach is usually a favorite spot for locals, but right now the beach cannot give us what we, as a community, need: a place for us to gather as a community. To watch sunsets, grill dinners, throw frisbees, play pickle ball, basketball, baseball, and softball, hold book groups and hands and beers, all together.

Westport will truly be open when the library flings its doors wide, when the Levitt Pavilion starts holding free concerts again, when restaurant and café tables are filled, when the Senior Center is hopping, when I’m dancing with my fellow aqua-fitters in the Y pool. When we can once again come together as a community—together, yes, even if it means doing so at a safe distance.

(To read Nina Sankovitch’s entire Vogue Daily story, click here.)

This is what Nina Sankovitch is waitingi for.

Pic Of The Day #966

Festive entrance to Anthropologie (Photo/Patricia McMahon)

Do You Hear What I Hear?

In the holiday spirit, there was music a-plenty downtown today.

The Staples High School Orphenians sang outside the Pop’TArt gallery …

(Photo/Mark Yurkiw)

… while across Main Street, the Suzuki School of Music played in front of Anthropologie.

(Photo/Mark Jacobs)

Pic Of The Day #933

Church Lane, late afternoon (Photo/Dan Woog)