Tag Archives: train station

Pics Of The Day #1066

Westport copes with the coronavirus …

Solitude at Grace Salmon Park (Photo/Jo Shields)

Empty parking lots on a weekday downtown … (Drone photo/Brandon Malin)

… at the train station, and on I-95 (Drone photo/Patrick Sikes)

The message has gotten through. Teenagers stay in their cars, practicing social distancing — but hang out together at Longshore. 

A mid-March late afternoon dip at Old Mill Beach (Photo/Robin Tauck)

Lindsay Blaivas, her daughter Kenzie and dog Ruby went for a neighborhood walk. Along the way, they left some messages. “Getting creative and staying connected!” Lindsay says.  Here’s one.

Two weeks ago, you’d say “huh?” Now you say, “Where’d you get it?!” (Photo/Darcy Hicks)

Santa Claus comes early to Stop & Shop (Photo/Chip Stephens)

Friday Flashback #39

A year after it was published in 1955, “The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit” became a major motion picture.

Gregory Peck starred as Tom Rath. He and his wife Betsy (Jennifer Jones) live in a rundown house in Westport. They have 3 kids; he commutes to an unfulfilling job in New York. The title quickly became a ’50s metaphor — one that endures today.

Some of the movie was filmed in Westport. The most memorable scenes — still recalled here more than 60 years later — took place on Main Street, and at the train station.

These 2 shots show Peck as a typical commuter. Besides the lack of a platform — and the demise of the New Haven Railroad — what else has changed? Click “Comments” below.

Blizzard of 2016: Late Afternoon Report

We’ve still got a few more hours of this. So put another log on the fire, open up one more bottle of wine, and enjoy these wonderful views of Westport in winter. (Click on or hover over to enlarge)

Snow bunny #1...

Snow bunny #1…

...snow bunny #2...

…snow bunny #2…

...and #3. (Photos above/Irene Penny)

…and #3. (Photos above/Irene Penny)

...and another. (Photos/John Videler)

One view from John Videler…

One view from John Videler...

…and another, with a bit of color from the flag. (Photo/John Videler)

Compo Beach, from the (relative) comfort of a Soundview Drive home. (Photo/Betsy P. Kahn)

Compo Beach, from the (relative) comfort of a Soundview Drive home. (Photo/Betsy P. Kahn)

No picnics today on South Beach! (Photo/Briana Walegir)

No picnics today on South Beach! (Photo/Briana Walegir)

You know that old saying about "neither snow nor rain..."? (Photo/Fred Cantor)

You know that old saying about “neither snow nor rain…”? (Photo/Fred Cantor)

No word from Metro-North on whether (weather?) there was "Good Service" today. (Photo/Fred Cantor)

No word from Metro-North on whether (weather?) there was “Good Service” today. (Photo/Fred Cantor)

It was slow going -- just as the sign says -- on Saugatuck Shores today. (Photo/Gene Borio)

It was slow going — just as the sign says — on Saugatuck Shores today. (Photo/Gene Borio)

A serene scene on Highland Road. Look closely though: That's an unplowed driveway there at the bottom of the photo. (Photo/Ellen Wentworth)

A serene scene on Highland Road. Look closely though: That’s an unplowed driveway at the bottom of the photo. (Photo/Ellen Wentworth)

Blizzard bonus feature: Seagulls were out surfing at Compo. Thanks to Dee Dee Scanlin, Chip Stephens and Betsy Pollak for sharing!

 

The Way We Were

For some reason, people have started emailing me great photos of the Westport of yore.

I know plenty of “06880” readers like them. Longtime residents, expats, even recent arrivals appreciate seeing where what’s changed in our town — and what hasn’t. (Click on or hover over any photo to enlarge it.)

So, without further ado:

A dealer called simply “Foreign Cars” did business on the Post Road near the Southport line, just past Barker’s (or, as we know it today, Super Stop & Shop).

Foreign cars - 1950s - Post Road
This looks familiar: near the train station. In the 1950s, it was Frank Reber and Charlie Cole’s Imported Cars. This photo, and the one above, came from Hemmings Daily, thanks to David Pettee.

Frank Reber and Charlie Coles Imported Cars

A few years earlier, this was the scene around the corner, at the train station. There’s Black Horse Liquors on the corner. The newsstand was Baer’s.

Train station 1950s - courtesy Debbie Rosenfield
Here’s the eastbound view. Both photos are courtesy of Debbie Rosenfield.

Train station 1950s eastbound - courtesy Debbie Rosenfield
This 1949 view of downtown comes (as do all the photos below it) from the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center at the University of Connecticut, via Brian Pettee. Colgan’s Pharmacy was where Tiffany sits today. Across Taylor Place was the trolley-shaped diner. Opposite that — hidden by trees — was the small park behind the old Westport Library. And that car in the middle of the intersection? It was turning onto the Post Road from Main Street, which had 2-way traffic.

Downtown 1948 - copyright Thomas J. Dodd Research Center UConn
Main Street Mobil occupied the current site of Vineyard Vines. In the distance you can see what for many years was Westport Pizzeria.

Main Street Mobil station 1949 - copyright Thomas J Dodd Research Center UConn
Back when the Merritt Parkway was for motoring, this was the signage (watch out for those jagged edges!).

Merritt Parkway exit 41 sign - 1949 - copyright Thomas J Dodd Research Center UConn
And when you came off Exit 41, this is what you saw. Underneath the “Westport” arrow, the sign says “State Police 3 mi.” The barracks were located on the Post Road where Walgreens is now — opposite the diner. Pretty close to I-95 — though in 1949, the “Connecticut Turnpike” had not yet been built.

Merritt Parkway exit 41 - 1949 - copyright Thomas J Dodd Research Center UConn