Tag Archives: Michael Kronick

Roundup: Longshore Sailing School, Silver Ribbon, Lynsey Addario …

=====================================================

Longshore Sailing School has a great reputation. The staff is knowledgeable, courteous, friendly and hardworking. Even when they’re swamped (ho ho), they handle everyone — students, renters, people who have no idea what they want — with care and concern.

So things must have gotten really bad for them to post this last Saturday, on social media:

The physical and emotional well-being of our staff and customers is our number one priority. We reserve the right to ask any renter/student to cease visiting our facility if their behavior is deemed to be inappropriate, especially when directed at another customer or Longshore Sailing School employee.

After dozens of “likes,” they added:

We love what we do, and we lover our staff. When you visit, we ask for kindness and readiness for a good time! Get ready for a stellar Sunday! Forecast is looking gorgeous.

It was a great weekend. Let’s hope whoever has been harassing the staff got the message, and took a hike.

Or at least took their obnoxious, entitled behavior elsewhere.

=======================================================

Deputy Fire Chief Michael Kronick is back in Westport. He just completed a 2-week wildfire assignment with the Connecticut Interstate Fire Crew, battling wildfires in Minnesota and Montana.

Westport Fire Chief Robert Yost says, “I’m proud to welcome back our deputy, who epitomizes Westport’s values of sacrifice and service to others. When communities and states need help, we can support our neighbors in their time of crisis battling dangerous wildfires. The experience and knowledge he gained in working a large-scale incident are invaluable to us.”

Deputy Fire Chief Michael Kronick, in action out west.

======================================================

Another longtime Westport business is closing.

Silver Ribbon — for 45 years, a favorite destination for jewelry and more — will shut its doors in the small shopping plaza next to Fortuna’s when its merchandise is gone.

Signs outside say “Going Out of Business.” Inside, they talk about a “Retirement Sale.”

Good quality goods, at all price points, are still available.

Silver Ribbon, next to Fortuna’s.

======================================================

The headline on yesterday’s Atlantic story was strong: “The Taliban’s Return is Catastrophic for Women.”

The subhead was even stronger: “As a photojournalist covering Afghanistan for two decades, I’ve seen how hard the country’s women have fought for their freedom, and how much they have gained. Now they stand to lose everything.”

The byline read “Lynsey Addario.” As usual, the Staples High School Pulitzer Prize- and MacArthur “genius grant”-winning photojournalist delivered even more than she promised.

Click here to read the full, harrowing piece. (Hat tip: Kathie Motes Bennewitz)

An Afghan woman (Photo/Lynsey Addario, courtesy of The Atlantic)

=======================================================

The hits just keep on coming for Courtney Kemp.

The talented writer/producer /creator of Starz’ “Power” franchise — and 1994 Staples High School graduate — has just signed a “high 8-figure overall deal” with Netflix. She’ll “create new series, and develop other projects for a global audience through her End of Episode banner,” says Deadline. Click here for the full story. (Hat tip: Judith Hamer)

Courtney Kemp

======================================================

COVID knocked the Westport Writers’ Workshop classes onto Zoom. But now they’re back — and in a great new location.

The new gallery-like teaching and event space is 25 Sylvan Road South — just down the hill from the previous site. It’s perfect for workshops, readings, publishing events and collaborations with other nonprofits.

Remote options are still available. Click here for fall schedules — and mark your calendars for an open house on September 9 (6 to 8 p.m.).

======================================================

Piglet — Westport’s very famous deaf, blind rescue puppy — will appear with Melissa Shapiro, the veterinarian who made him famous — at the 3rd annual Smart Walk for Smart Kids with Learning Disabilities. The event is October 3, at Sherwood Island State Park.

Shapiro will talk (and Piglet will watch) about her new best-selling book, “Piglet: The Unexpected Story of a Deaf, Blind, Pink Puppy and His Family.”

“We can’t wait to share a little positive Piglet Mindse with everyone after the walk,” Shapiro says.

The Smart Walk is a day of crafts, games, music, ice cream — and the fundraising walk. Click here for more information, and to register.

=======================================================

It’s pretty tough to come up with an all-new category for “dumb parking.”

But Rich Stein thinks he’s found one:

(Photo/Rich Stein)

=======================================================

Longtime Westporter Barbara Reis has spent over 50 years writing musicals.

They’ve been produced at the White Barn Theater, Fairfield Playhouse, Orpheum in New York and others.

She and collaborator Nancy Tobin have just completed “My Millionaire.” The musical is based on a Mark Twain short story.

They believe a presentation at Mark Twain’s former house would be great. They’re also looking for other ideas. Unfortunately, her agent has died. So she’s looking for help from “06880” readers, to move the show along.

If you’ve got ideas — or are interested in learning more — email barbarasmusic@sbcglobal.net

Produce this man’s short story musical!

======================================================

Our “Westport … Naturally” feature has never included sports. There’s always a first time …

(Photo/Tracy Porosoff)

======================================================

And finally … Nanci Griffith died last Friday, at 68. The Grammy-winning singer/songwriter “kept one foot in folk and the other in country, and was blessed with a soaring voice equally at home in both genres,” the New York Times says. Click here for a full obituary.

Wildfires Consume West; Westporters Help

Westport Fire Chief Robert Yost is used to the hundreds of calls his department handles: house fires, accidents on I-95 and the Merritt, false alarms.

As the town’s director of emergency management, he plans for and coordinates responses to hurricanes, blizzards and, now, a virus pandemic.

But he’s a professional. And as millions of acres burn out west, he and Deputy Chief Michael Kronick answered the call.

Westport Fire Chief Robert Yost, as a medical assistant in Colorado.

The pair are members of the Connecticut Interstate Wildfire Crew. It’s our contribution to a national mutual aid pact. Members help states on an as-needed basis, with any kind of weather event.

(And yes, Yost says, Connecticut has wildfires. The most recent were around 1940.)

This summer, Connecticut sent firefighters to several western states. Yost — who was posted to Idaho and Wyoming in 2016, and Montana in 2018 — went this year to Colorado, as a medical assistant.

Assistant Chief Kronick also served before, in California and Colorado.

Deputy Fire Chief Michael Kronick in Colorado, 2 years ago.

Yost got the call this year at 11 p.m., on a Saturday. The next day, he was on a plane to Ft. Collins. The 100,oo0-plus acre Cameron Peak fire threatened homes, and the University of Colorado mountain campus. It is still only 4% contained.

Yost and his crew set up structure protection. They ran hoses and pumps, wrapped homes in preventive material, bulldozed lines and started back fires.

It’s nothing like fighting a Westport fire. “This is a long game, and a logistics war,”” Yost says. Feeding and supplying 1,000 firefighters takes as much coordination as the actual firefighting.

COVID complicated everything, of course. Rather than one central camp, firefighters were deployed to “spike” camps that reduced co-mingling.

For Yost, the opportunity to observe incident management was important too. He sat in on planning meetings, with the command staff. The insights he gained will serve him well in planning for, and reacting to, disasters here, he says.

Whatever they are.

No, those are not clouds. They’re part of Colorado’s Cameron Peak fire.

Westport Firefighter Battles Western Blaze

California’s wildfires are snagging all the headlines.

But other states face fires too.

They need help. And — just as the rest of the country sends aid when we’re battered by hurricanes or blizzards — Connecticut firefighters have headed west.

Deputy Chief Michael Kronick joined 18 other members of the CT Interstate Fire Crew. They traveled last month to Colorado, where thousands of acres burned in the Buttermilk and Green Mountain Fires.

Kronick returned home last night.

Deputy Fire Chief Michael Kronick, in Colorado.

Connecticut participates in a reciprocal aid program operated by the US Forest Service. The state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection maintains a roster of staff and personnel from local fire departments who are certified to fight wildfires.

Kronick — a member of the Connecticut Interstate Fire Crew since 2002 — has been deployed on 11 wildfires throughout North America. He’s a great representative of Westport’s superb Fire Department.

Westport — and Colorado — salute Deputy Fire Chief Michael Kronick!

Colorado wildfire

 

Firing Up Westport Volunteers

If you’re like many Connecticut residents, when you hear of wildfires in the West you think, “What a shame.”

Then — if you’re like me — you move on to news of the next catastrophe.

Michael Kronick and Robert Yost are doing more. Much more.

Robert Yost

Robert Yost

The pair — members of the Westport Fire Department — are actually fighting those fires.

They’re part of a 20-member Connecticut crew that’s battling the Black Fire in Idaho.

This is Yost’s 1st volunteer effort. Kronick, meanwhile, has served in the Western US several times, most recently last year in Northern California.

And that’s the key: It’s all volunteer. Westport’s firefighters are using their own vacation and time off to help save land and homes — and risking their own lives to do so.

Alert “06880” reader Steve Axthelm think that’s crazy.

“These 2 men are very courageous and generous,” he says.

Michael Kronick“But don’t you think we as a town and community ought to sponsor them — at least in part — so they don’t have to use vacation or personal time to help out there? Wouldn’t it be a fair and appropriate contribution to the needs of our fellow Americans?”

It would indeed. If you’ve got an idea of how to make that happen, click “Comments” below.

Michael Kronick and Robert Yost are doing plenty. Helping them is the least we can do.

California Wildfires Get Westport Aid

It’s not often that tiny Connecticut can help huge California.

But the Golden State has its hands full with massive wildfires. A 20-person fire crew from here is heading there. Among the firefighters is Westport assistant chief Michael Kronick.

Kronick — a certified wildfire fighter — has helped before. In 2013 he was deployed to Quebec; before that, he was sent to other fires out west.

Connecticut’s Interstate Fire Crew is part of a reciprocal aid program operated by the US Forest Service.

Thankfully, wildfires are not a big problem here. But every state has its own weather and environmental issues. It’s good to know that when we need help, other states will have our backs. Just like — thanks to people like Michael Kronick — we now have theirs.

Assistant fire chief Michael Kronick.

Assistant fire chief Michael Kronick.