Category Archives: Beach

Pic Of The Day #1247

Compo crosswalk (Photo/Patricia McMahon)

Pic Of The Day #1245

Reflections of Compo Beach (Photo/Les Dinkin)

Pics Of The Day #1244

Nearly every day, it seems, someone emails me photos of clouds.

Most of them are interesting. But very few rise to the high, truly compelling bar this is the Pic of the Day.

Last night’s clouds, though, were legit amazing. And as proof that they were special: Several different readers submitted their shots. Here are a few:

Compo Beach Mobi-Mat … (Photo/Jeanine Esposito)

… and heading toward the cannons (Photo/Jeanine Esposito)

On Long Island Sound … (Photo/Cam Klein)

… and at Burying Hill Beach (Photo/Nico Eisenberger)

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 25 Gallery

This week’s art gallery features a good mix of work by regulars and newcomers, and a nice balance of paintings and photos.

As always, all submissions are welcome — in any medium. The only rule: It should be inspired by, relevant to, or somehow, in some way, connected to our current world. Student art of all ages is especially welcome.

Coronavirus, social justice, politics, or just the beauty around us — have at it! Email dwoog@optonline.net, to share your work with the world.

Karen Weingarten’s grandchildren built these cars. She came up with the idea for the photo, and the title: “The Race is On.”

“Dining Out Is In” (Ellin Spadone)

“The Coast” (Amy Schneider)

“On Compo” (Artist MaryLou Roels says, “Don’t let things become bigger than they are.
It’s about perspective.”

“Romeo and Fenestra” acrylic (Eva Sladek, age 13)

“Burying Hill Beach” (Wendy Levy)

“On Point” (Lawrence Weisman)

“The First Day of School: Summer Shoes Left Behind (Liz Blasko)

Pics Of The Day #1243

On September 11, 2001 — in the immediate aftermath of the World Trade Center attacks — Sherwood Island State Park was designated as the staging area for Connecticut’s rescue assistance.

Tragically, our state’s efforts were never needed. There was no one to rescue.

But the park — nestled between Compo and Burying Hill Beaches, and a spot that cloudless day where smoke from the burning towers was clearly visible — now plays another important role.

It is the site of Connecticut’s official “living 9/11 memorial.” A simple, somber yet elegant stone — and the names of 153 state residents killed that morning — remind visitors of so many lives well lived, ended senselessly far too soon.

Whether or not you knew any of those men and women — some of whom grew up in, or lived in 2001, in Westport — does not matter. Every Westporter owes it to the memory of every American to visit the Sherwood Island 9/11 Living Memorial. (Click here to learn more about it.)

(Photos/Amy Schneider)

Roundup: Census, Bloodroot, Shorefest, More


As the 2020 census continues, Westport’s self-response rate is 76.2%. That’s well above the rate for the state of Connecticut: 69.4%. (The figures include responses from all known addresses.)

Officials urge anyone who has not completed the census to do so. Census data informs how billions of dollars in federal funds are distributed for health clinics, school lunch programs, disaster recovery initiatives, and other critical programs and services for the next 10 years.

Click here to complete the census response. Click here to see Westport’s response rate. (Hat tip: Peter Gold)


The Westport Farmers’ Market has offered great, healthy food for more than a decade.

Bloodroot has done the same for nearly half a century more.

The Bridgeport feminist vegetarian restaurant/bookstore — opened in the 1970s by Westporters Noel Furie and Selma Miriam, nurtured by ever since and still run by the indefatigable women — is the subject of a new documentary.

“Bloodroot” premieres Sunday, September 20 (7 p.m.). The film will be shown at the Imperial Avenue parking lot — home to the Remarkable Theater and its partner for this showing, the Westport Farmers’ Market.

The film — about feminism as well as food — is an homage to Furie and Miriam, says WFM executive director Lori Cochran-Dougall. They are longtime supporters of the market, and a mentor to its director. Click here for tickets.

Three local restaurants are offering tailgating options for the documentary.

Terrain’s $50 box for 2 people includes tomato salad, kale falafel and blackberry pie. Click here for ordering information.

Manna Toast’s offering ($20 for 2) includes choice of toast, salad, rosemary popcorn and iced tea. Click here to order.

Kawa Ni’s dinner ($60 plus tax and 3% kitchen share, for 2) includes tsukemono, shaved broccoli miso goma, tomato tofu pockets and a bun bowl. Call 203-557-8775 to order by 4 p.m. on September 18.

(Form left): Noel Furie and Selma Miriam, Bloodroot founders.


Speaking of food: Friends of Sherwood Island — members of the organization with that name, and those who merely love Connecticut’s 1st state park, a 236-acre gem hidden right on the Westport coast — are invited to an important fundraiser.

Shorefest on a Roll rolls out Sunday, September 20. Guests will enjoy a rolling tour of the park, accompanied by a podcast describing its fascinating history and its many features — plus a “lobster roll to go” feast.

The event includes a field of whirligigs, exotic kites, disc golf exhibitions, musical performances and model plane flyovers at the park airfield, all while cruising the loop at 10 miles an hour.

The only stop is near the end of the tour to pick up hot or cold lobster roll dinners. The entire loop takes 12 minutes.

Click here for tickets. Proceeds support Friends’ efforts, including the newly renovated Nature Center, tree planting, maintenance of the vast purple martin colony, and the 9/11 Memorial.


Dog-gone it!

The Westport Weston Chamber of Commerce held out as long as they could. But the 5th Annual Westport Dog Festival — set for October 4, after being rescheduled from May — has been canceled.

That’s the second major event — following Slice of Saugatuck — shelved by the Chamber, due to the coronavirus.

But they’re running concerts both weekends. Terrapin: The Grateful Dead Experience performs tonight, in a sold-out show. Two other shows are slated for October 2 and 3. Tickets go on sale next week. For more information, click here.


And finally … as we remember 9/11:

Pic Of The Day #1240

Sailing off Compo Beach (Drone photo/Adam Drake)

Pics Of The Day #1238

Just before the lifeguard stands are stored away …

(Photo/Amy Schneider)

(Photo/Jessica Wolff)

Photo Challenge #297

There is so much that’s special about Old Mill, Sherwood Mill Pond and Compo Cove: the pedestrian-only wooden bridges. The oyster house, reachable only by boat. The old-fashioned garages, one of them festooned with seashells.

And the 3-wheeled vehicle that sits in Clark Hanford’s lawn, next to the narrow walkway leading to those garages and bridges (with the oyster house off in the distance).

That little car was the subject of last week’s Photo Challenge. Every reader who responded knew exactly where it sits. Congrats to Matt Murray, Lynn Untermeyer Miller, Linda Revelli, Tom Green, Rich Stein, Fred Cantor, Seth Goltzer, Karen Como, Tom Risch, Amy Schneider and Bob Belciano.

Some of those readers live at or near Old Mill. Some enjoy walking there. All are intrigued by it. Click here, to see for yourself.

And see if you can identify this week’s Photo Challenge. If you know where in Westport you’d spot this, click “Comments” below.

Roundup: Jazz, Food, Black History, More


Outdoor entertainment returned to MoCA Westport last night. A socially distanced crowd enjoyed Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Alexa Tarantino Quartet.

More concerts will be announced soon.

Outdoors at MoCA.

With food insecurity still a serious issue, the Westport Woman’s Club Food Closet is grateful for a nice donation from Westport National Bank.

Any organizations or family can donate food to neighbors in need. Bring non-perishable donations to the WWC 44 Imperial Avenue) from 9 a.m. to onoon on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. If the clubhouse is locked, call 203-227-4240.

Monetary donations are also welcome. Click here, or send a check made out to Westport Woman’s Club to WWC, 44 Imperial Avenue, Westport, CT  06880.

At the Westport Woman’s Club food pantry (from left); Wendy McKeon, WWC food closet co-chair; Robin Clark, WWC member and Westport National Bank vice president; Selma Blue, WNB head teller.


The “hidden history of Black Westport” will be visible to Westporters next Saturday (September 12, 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.)

As a follow-up to the Westport Museum of History & Culture’s “Remembered: The History of African Americans in Westport” exhibit, guides will lead tour groups (maximum of 10 people) throughout downtown.

They’ll describe local history, from enslaved people to soldiers, sailors, activists, artists, and respected residents, through existing buildings and long destroyed sites.

Tickets are $10. Reservations are required; click here to register. Foe moew information, email programs@westporthistory.org.


Aarti Khosla needs help in providing chocolate hearts to every Westport and Weston educator, as a show of thanks for all they do. 10% of all proceeds benefit another educational institution: Mercy Learning Center.

Click here to purchase hearts ($8 each). You can also stop by Aarti’s store, Le Rouge Chocolates (190 Main Street).

 


The final (and 15th) #FridayFlowers are on display at the Compo Beach lifeguard station. The Westport Garden Club — sponsor of the summer-long floral project — is grateful to the guards, and everyone at Westport Parks & Rec — for keeping our beaches safe and fun.

Pictured below (from left): David Levy, Noah Ross, Mia Parkes, Ella Thompson and Avery Tucker.

(Photo/Topsy Siderowf)

RTM representative and Westport Writers Workshop founder Jessica Bram undergoes brain surgery at Yale University Hospital this morning.

Doctors will drain excess hydration to reverse motor, cognitive and memory impairment resulting from a recent fall.

Jessica sends affection and high regard to the Westport community, past and current writing students, RTM colleagues, and Webb Road neighbors.


And finally … today is National Be Late for Something Day. I’ll have a song for you later. Maybe.