Tag Archives: Winfield Street Deli

COVID-19: More Rent Reductions; Parks & Rec, Transit News; Realtors Unite; Staples Online; Low-Interest Loans; More

Yesterday’s Roundup began with news of the rent reduction promised by local landlords Edward and Joan Hyde, to tenants like Westport Yarns.

Breno Donatti — owner of Winfield Street Coffee on Post Road West — quickly emailed, noting that his landlord, Alon Panovka, also agreed to waive April’s rent. He’ll discuss May when the time comes.

“Alon has been great to us in our 4 years here,” Breno says.

Winfield Deli closed March 17. He may even get credit for part of this month. Thanks, Alon! (Meanwhile, feel free to order gift cards to use when Winfield reopens!)


Some rules don’t change. This April 1 — as always — dogs are no longer allowed on Compo, Old Mill or Burying Hill beaches, or the Longshore golf course. Dogs are of course welcome at Winslow Park.

The Parks & Recreation Department also announces that because it’s uncertain when the beaches will fully open, beach emblem sales are postponed until further notice.

Parks & Rec reminds Westporters not to congregate at parks and athletic fields. “We encourage all to get outside and get some exercise, but please do not gather in groups,” says director Jen Fava.

Sorry, Fido. As of Wednesday, life will no longer include a day at the beach.


Originally, the Westport Public Schools planned a 2-week closure. As it becomes clear that the shutdown will last (probably much) longer, the district is adapting to online education.

For Staples High School students, that means more interaction with teachers, in more manageable blocks of time. It’s a new way of learning, and administrators, staff and students are figuring it out together.

Whether you’ve got kids in high school or not — or none at all — a video from principal Stafford Thomas is, well, instructive. It shows how Staples is adapting; it outlines the promises and challenges, and it’s a vivid illustration of the cascading effects the coronavirus is having on us all. Click below to view.

 


Real estate agencies often compete for listings and sales. But many came together this week, to help fill a huge need at Yale New Haven Hospital.

A doctor told Sally Bohling they needed Lysol wipes, gloves and shoe covers. The William Raveis realtor called her friends contacted Karen Scott and Mary Ellen Gallagher, of KMS Partners @ Compass.

They put out the word to the Westport realtor community. Quickly, literally thousands of contributions poured in.

The booties idea was particularly inspired. “We aren’t hosting open houses, and the winter weather is behind us. So offering the ones we’re not using was a no-brainer,” Karen says.

 


Connecticut small businesses and nonprofits impacted by the pandemic can apply for 1-year, no-interest loans of up to $75,000,

The Connecticut Recovery Bridge Loan Program will make $25 million available to state businesses and nonprofits with up to 100 employees. Loans are up to the lesser of either three months operating expenses and/or $75,000. Click here for details.


With sharply decreased train ridership, starting Monday (March 30) Westport Transit will replace commuter shuttles with an on-demand, door-to-platform minibus service. It will operate to and from any Westport location and the Saugatuck and Greens Farms stations.

Calls should be made the previous day before 5 p.m. (Saturday for Monday pickup) for morning commutes, and at least 45 minutes prior to pickup for the evening commute. The phone number is 203-299-5180.

Door-to-door services for seniors and residents with disabilities are unchanged.

For more information, click here.


It’s a small idea from Hallie and Maya Wofsy, but a great one: Put a red or pink heart on your door. The goal is to show support for all our amazing front-line healthcare workers.

Take a look on your walks through the neighborhood. The hearts are already there. And if you don’t have colored paper or markers, Maya will (very safely) drop one ready-made at your door. Email mayawofsy@gmail.com for details.


And finally, when these 2 kids were quarantined in Italy, they decided to play a little Coldplay. On their violins. Their choice of a song — “Viva La Vida” — couldn’t be more perfect.

 

Photo Challenge #193

There are many ways to describe the location of last week’s Photo Challenge.

Post Road West, right over the bridge. The 2nd floor apartments over Arezzo restaurant, Winfield Street Deli, Stephen Kempson and Age of Reason. The Hunt & Downs Building. Across from National Hall.

All are correct. It’s a familiar sight, even if the angle was different. Click here for the photo.

Congratulations to Tom Ryan, Elaine Marino, Rich Stein, Fred Cantor, Seth Goltzer, Bruce Salvo, Linda Amos, Rosalie Kaye, Bobbie Herman, Martha Witte, Joelle Malec, Yvonne Ferris, Joyce Bottone and Michael Calise. No matter how they identified it, they nailed the challenge.

Here’s this week’s photo:

(Photo/Mark Mathias)

We’ve all walked by it — often. But how many of us actually notice it?

If you have, click “Comments” below.

And The Best Chicken Parm In The State Is…

I usually don’t post “best of…” polls.

But this one is truly important.

USA Today — with the help of local experts CT Bites — is asking readers: Who makes the best chicken parm sandwich in Connecticut?

The winner could be right here in Westport.

Three of the 20 nominees serve that favorite dish right here.

Gaetano’s Deli, Tutti’s Ristorante and the Winfield Street Italian Deli (formerly Art’s) are all in the running.

Click here to vote. (NOTE: You can do it once a day, through April 10).

Mangia!

The Winfield Street Deli chicken parm.

Deli Owner Tries To Solve Pickle

The state Department of Transportation calls the Post Road/Riverside Avenue/Wilton Road intersection one of the most dangerous in Connecticut.

Everyone in Westport agrees. But every day, Breno Donatti gets a first-hand view of exactly how horrible it is.

In just the few weeks since he took over Art’s Delicatessen, the owner of what is now Winfield Street Italian Deli watches pedestrians run for their lives as they cross the street.

He gets plenty of lunch and catering orders from the Wright Street building and the offices on Wilton Road. His employees are terrified to deliver, though. At least twice, they’ve nearly been hit by cars.

The Winfield Street Deli on Post Road West.

The Winfield Street Deli on Post Road West.

It cuts both ways. “People who work across the street don’t feel like risking their lives to get coffee here,” Breno says.

And customers parking in front of Winfield Deli are beeped at constantly, as they back into a space.

This morning, Breno emailed First Selectman Jim Marpe. He asked for a simple “Yield to Pedestrians” sign, or maybe a pedestrian button on the traffic light.

What happened next made him realize that — despite the Post Road hassles — he opened his store in a great town.

Within minutes, Kirsten Carr from the selectman’s office wrote back. She said that although the streets are state property, she would forward his concerns to the town’s traffic control officer.

And just a few minutes after that, 2 police officers — Ashley Del Vecchio and Al D’Amura — strolled in.

They told Breno that they’d already called state officials, to plead for more signs or a renovation of the intersection. And they assured him they’ll do everything in their power to help the state make the area safer for pedestrians.

“They were so courteous, gracious and responsive,” Breno says. “Wonderful people!”

Breno Donatti (right) and Matthew Mandell, executive director of the Westport Weston Chamber of Commerce.

Breno Donatti (right) and Matthew Mandell, executive director of the Westport Weston Chamber of Commerce.

The intersection won’t improve instantly. But plenty of people are working on it.

Including the concerned — and now pleased — owner of Winfield Deli.

Grana Pastificio: Pasta Just Like Nonna Made!

Back in the day, Saugatuck was a real Italian neighborhood. That meant real Italian stores — and real Italian food.

The neighborhood has changed — several times. But down by the train station, a new store with old-world roots promises to link the Saugatucks of yesterday and today.

Grana Pastificio nestles in a corner of Winfield Street Italian Deli (which earlier this year took over the Cocoa Michelle/Bonjo site).

The name means “small grain pasta factory.” The tiny shop fills a niche left when Villarina’s closed last fall. But it’s much more than a chain store in a shopping mall.

Grana Pastificio's entrance on Railroad Place.

Grana Pastificio’s entrance on Railroad Place.

Grana Pastificio fronts the train station. Commuters are its main customers — and, of course, the railroad was built by Italians.

Owners Eni Jimenez and Thomas Tenaglia are brothers. In 1935, their great-grandfather opened a macaroni shop in Stamford. Their grandmother worked there. Starting at age 10, they received a doctorate in pasta from her.

Eni studied to be a physician’s assistant. Thomas went to HVAC school. But they’d always had restaurant jobs, and a year ago they started researching the retail market for pasta.

When they met the Winfield Deli owner, they struck gold.

“We love old world traditions,” Eni says. That’s not idle talk. The brothers hand roll, hand cut and hand knead everything. They do their own cheeses, and mill their own grains. The only machinery is a refrigerator.

Emi Jimenez (left) and Thomas Tenaglia, hard at work.

Eni Jimenez (left) and Thomas Tenaglia, hard at work. A mural will soon replace the bare wall behind them.

In the morning, commuters pick up order sheets. They check their choices — hand cut pappardelle, spaghetti alla Chitarra, fettucine, tagliatelle, garganelli, lasagna sheets. bucatini, rigatoni, lumache, gemelli, macaroni, shells and much more — and can opt for whole wheat, squid ink, red pepper or teff.

There’s also ravioli, cappelletti, tortellini, agnolotti and mezzeluna, stuffed with ricotta, beef, port, shrooms, ruffle Ricotta or burrata — plus cavatelli and gnocchi. Sauces include bolognese, tomato and pesto.

Customers select their pick-up time that evening. (All Eni and Thomas really need is an hour or two.)

The brothers pair their pasta with wines at nearby Saugatuck Grain and Grape. They also recommend cheeses.

Coming soon: imported olive oil, and weekly pasta-making classes.

A few of the many pastas at Grana Pastificio.

A few of the many pastas at Grana Pastificio.

The idea is for commuters to make fresh pasta at home — easily and quickly. Because it’s so fresh (with no preservatives), the pasta takes just 5 minutes to boil in salted water.

The brothers deliver excess food to the Bridgeport Rescue Mission.

“We’re bringing back old-world traditions — and old-style types of pasta,” Eni says. “We take pride in what we do.”

Longtime Saugatuck residents will take pride in Grana Pastificio.

The many Westport newcomers, too.

(For more information email info@granapastificio.com, or call 203-557-3855.)