Tag Archives: Westport Senior Center

SMORES: Staples Students Help Seniors Tackle Technology

The reopening of the Senior Center on July 1 is good news for hundreds of Westporters. For over 15 months they have missed the classes, lectures and social events that were so meaningful and fun.

It’s good news too for all those seniors who need help learning a new electronic device, figuring out how to Zoom, or otherwise coping with the digital world.

Before the pandemic, they got help in person from teenagers. A dozen Staples High School students were part of SMORES (Social Media Outreach Educators), a group started by Jake Motyl.

SMORES members and their “students,” at the Senior Center before the pandemic.

The coronavirus forced them all online. It was not easy teaching someone unfamiliar with a tablet or phone how to use it remotely, but both the teens and their “students” persevered.

Earlier this month, Jake graduated from Staples. This fall, he heads to the University of Southern California.

But SMORES is stronger than ever. The new leader is his sister, rising junior Caroline Motyl.

She’s been Jake’s vice president since freshman year. She shares his enthusiasm for helping older Westporters. In fact, it’s one of her passions.

Caroline Motyl

“I’m pretty active in social justice — racism, sexism, environmentalism,” she says. “But people don’t usually talk about ageism. A lot of people look down on older people. They think they’re not in touch.”

Caroline admits that she’s sometimes guilty herself. “When my mom can’t post on Instagram, I’m like, ‘Come on!’ She says, ‘I didn’t grow up with this. You did.’ I’m trying really hard to prevent myself and others from being like that.”

Through SMORES, Caroline has learned to look at perspectives different from her own. “It’s so easy for me to use a cellphone. My generation does it so fast. We do everything fast. But that’s not the case for older generations. They do things more slowly.”

The importance of “non-digital natives” navigating the complex universe of devices, social media, printers and routers was driven home last Thanksgiving. Caroline helped a woman set up her iPad, so she could Zoom with family members.

“That’s such an important holiday. It meant so much to her to be together, even just on Zoom,” Caroline says.

She looks forward to helping, live, again. “I thought online school was hard. But trying to help someone use a phone while actually n the phone was one of the hardest things I’ve done. I couldn’t point to something, or touch the screen. But it’s so important for them to feel connected. Somehow we did it.”

In 8th grade science class, Caroline had to write detailed instructions on how she made a Lego structure. This year, she hopes to use that concept to create step-by-step instructions for some of the most frequently asked questions.

“So many other countries treat older people with the utmost respect,” Caroline notes. “Our country does not treat them as we should.”

She and her fellow SMORES members are trying to change that. One cellphone, tablet and laptop at a time.

(For more information or help, text Caroline at 203-644-7749, or call the Senior Center: 203-341-5099.)

Roundup: Joey’s, Vaccine, Seniors’ Blog …

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Yesterday’s gorgeous weather brought beach-lovers to Compo.

It also kicked off the season for entitled drivers. First off the mark: This person, who believes the only way to enjoy the water is to park as close as possible to it.

(Photo/Roseann Spengler)

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Another sign of spring (and summer): Joey’s by the Shore (featuring Elvira Mae’s Coffee Bar) opened yesterday.

Hours are currently 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., weather dependent. Joey, Betsy and the crew say hi!

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After all the stories about difficulties scoring a COVID vaccine appointment, I heard the other side: how efficiently the process runs, once you actually get a slot for a shot.

The operation at the former Lord & Taylor parking lot in Stamford sounded particularly well organized.

That’s where I was scheduled yesterday, for my first dose. It’s all true.

From check-in to the shot itself and on through the 15-minute observation period afterward, the process was top notch. It was run with military precision. That’s not surprising: Connecticut’s National Guard was in charge.

Kudos to all involved. A big shout-out to the Guardsman pictured below. We had a great time chatting. He represents his unit — and the entire operation — exceptionally well.

The only tweak needed is laughably minor. The address given for the Lord & Taylor lot is 110 High Ridge Road. But the entrance for vaccines is on Long Ridge.

I can live with that.

(Photo/Dan Woog)

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Westport Police say:

“The Westport Police Department is shocked and saddened by the murders that occurred this past week in the greater Atlanta area. Our hearts go out to the victims as well as their loved ones. Violence committed against a person because of their race is something that should never be tolerated or excused.

“The Westport Police stands with law enforcement agencies nationwide as well as our partners at the Anti-Defamation League in condemning this horrible crime.For more information and resources please go to the Anti-Defamation League’s website.”

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Electric vehicle brands and state legislators hold a press conference tomorrow (Monday, March 22, 10 a.m.) at the Westport train station’s eastbound side.

They’ll discuss what they call “outdated dealer franchise laws that have plagued direct electric vehicle sales for almost a decade.”

A proposed bill would give “innovative companies the ability to have an uncorked presence in Connecticut.” Without this legislation, they say, many EV manufacturers will continue to be blocked from opening sales sites, offering test drives, and selling directly to consumers.” Click here for more details.

Westport is an appropriate site for the press conference. We have the highest percentage of EVs registered in the state — over 250 Teslas alone.

Electric vehicles lined up by the Staples charging stations (from left): Chevy Bolt, Tesla S, VW, Tesla X, Nissan Leafes,

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For nearly 2 years, Rosemary Cass’ blog has enriched the lives of people age 55 and older.

“Seeing it Clearly Now” inspires everyone — retired or not — be better with age. Her focus is on learning new things, finding purpose, and exploring the arts.

The blog features creative works of older writers and artists. For example, a recent post explored the writer’s gratification from her volunteer work with Al’s Angels.

Many contributors are members of the Westport Senior Center. Cass herself is a student in Jan Bassin’s writing workshops.

She’s always looking for submissions. Click here for the blog; email cass.rosemary@gmail.com.

Rosemary Cass uses the pen name “Rosy Prose.”

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And finally … Happy 436th birthday, Johann Sebastian Bach!

 

Senior Center, Senior Residence Engage Older Westporters

The Senior Center has been closed since spring.

The Residence at Westport opened this summer.

Now the 2 — both, in their way, “homes” for older men and women — are working together, to end feelings of isolation forced by the pandemic.

With its Imperial Avenue doors shut, the Senior Center has moved many programs to Zoom, YouTube and Cablevision Channel 79.

Music performances, museum tours, art shows, workouts with Patty Kondub, book talks, discussions on emotional well-being — all are shared with the Residence. That’s the new assisted living community, opposite Greens Farms Elementary School.

The Senior Center is closed. But its programs continue.

Meanwhile, Residence residents made decorations, like Halloween pumpkins, to add to Senior Center home delivery programs. The Residence’s chef baked pies for Thanksgiving meals.

Senior Center director Sue Pfister has known The Residence executive director Michelle Piskin for years. Both women take holistic approaches, caring for the physical, emotional and social needs of the people they work with.

Pfister also reached out Heather Wood, activities director at The Residence, to make sure she knew everything the Senior Center offers, to all Westporters.

Whether in-person or online, the Senior Center is a superb resource for older citizens. The Residence is a great option for people wanting to downsize, yet still live in the area.

When the Senior Center reopens, the relationship between it and The Residence will continue — in-person, as well as in cyberspace.

When the Senior Center reopens, residents at The Residence will enjoy in-person events. (Photo/Dan Woog)

Marpe’s Vaccine Update: Patience, Persistence Needed

1st Selectman Jim Marpe says:

The state of Connecticut is scheduling and vaccinating people 75 and older as part of the vaccine rollout Phase 1b.

People ages 65 to 74 are next in line for eligibility. Information will be posted on the Westport Weston Health District website when the state opens up clinics to this group. More information for frontline essential workers and individuals with underlying medical conditions with increased risk for severe illness will be forthcoming.

Many Westporters are eager to get vaccines. Some have registered themselves into the CDC’s Vaccine Administration Management System (VAMS), scheduled their appointments and have received first and, in some cases, second vaccine doses.

Others have found technical challenges, a lack of information and guidance, or difficulties getting their first or second doses scheduled. Currently, vaccination dates are not being scheduled sooner than 3 weeks out. The process is moving slowly. Frustrations are high.

Additionally, the supply of vaccines is not keeping up with the demand. A total of 1.3 million Connecticut residents are eligible for the vaccine during Phase 1b. The state must ration the 46,000 doses it receives each week. At this rate, it will take months before all eligible residents are vaccinated. There is a national vaccine shortage, and it impacts us locally.

The WWHD staff have consistently ordered more vaccines than it they receive. The WWHD runs up to 3 vaccine clinics per week at the WWHD on Bayberry Lane, and the Westport, Weston and Easton Senior Centers.

With a limited supply of vaccines, the WWHD advises eligible Westporters not to wait for an appointment at a Westport clinic. Rather, go to the first available appointment and plan to schedule your second vaccine immediately after. The state’s 211 line now includes a public vaccine clinic directory to search for local clinics.

We are aware that some have found success bypassing VAMS and registering through hospital portals in the surrounding cities. These third party VAMS sites appear to be more direct and do not require waiting for confirmation emails and codes. For links to some local participating vaccination centers, please see further below.

We are also aware that some residents do not have the mobility to obtain a vaccine in another nearby community, or might not be able to leave their homes. Once supplies are available, the town plans for a larger-scale local vaccination site, as well as a traveling clinic for those who are most vulnerable and homebound.

The state’s long-term distribution plan focuses on 5 or 6 large vaccination clinics set up across Connecticut, and with neighborhood CVS and Walgreens pharmacies as potential local options. However, there are multiple challenges with distribution, administration and the vaccine supply itself that must be overcome at the state and federal levels first.

Keep in mind that neither the Westport Department of Human Services nor the Westport Senior Center has access to the VAMS portal, nor can they schedule a vaccination on a resident’s behalf. Human Services staff is working diligently to answer questions and offer resources to help.

Vaccine line outside the Westport Senior Center. (Photo/Ted Horowitz)

Ultimately, the state’s official helpline (211) is the best option for registration by phone or to have your technical questions answered.

Do not be discouraged as the inevitable complications and delays occur. Your patience is needed during these trying times. Please remember to continue to wear a face covering, social distance and maintain good hygiene.

For more information on the vaccine in Westport, visit www.westportct.gov/vaccine or print Westport’s Vaccination Tip Sheet here: https://www.westportct.gov/home/showpublisheddocument?id=37255

For information on the WWHD’s plans to schedule and conduct vaccinations, go to www.wwhd.org

The state’s vaccine information site can be found here: https://portal.ct.gov/Coronavirus/COVID-19-Vaccination—75-and-older

Roundup: 103rd Birthday, COVID Vaccine, Insurrection Arrest, More

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Happy 103rd birthday today to the incomparable Lee Greenberg.

The long-time — very long-time — Westporter (and Rotary Club member) — is as active as ever.

Arlene Yolles writes: “I first met her at Compo, where we played backgammon (she’s pretty good) with a set with 2 checkers missing. In their place, she used stones from the beach.

“You can find her there, with her lady Gina, around 3 p.m. almost any day of the year, by the one tree on South Beach. Her car tag says ‘Lee Gee.’

“I’ve attended several of her Cultural Salons (think Gertrude Stein in Paris) in her lovely home. She has a grand piano, and invited accomplished, talented musicians to perform.”

Lee Greenberg is a Westport treasure. The entire town honors her today!

PS: Just how “long-time” a Westporter is Lee? She’d already been here for years when, in 1957, she and her husband Nat rented their Long Lots Road home to Liz Taylor and her husband, Mike Todd.

Lee Greenberg celebrated her 100th birthday with Zefera, one of 4 great-grandchildren.

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All around town, Westporters are asking friends and neighbors about the COVID vaccine.

On Thursday, February 11 (7 p.m.), you can hear all about Pfizer’s creation and rollout of it, from 4 of the company’s top executives. They’re familiar to us, too — they’re our friends and neighbors.

The Westport Library virtual event features Jeremy Price, director of clinical innovation and strategic partnerships (and a Library trustee); Westport resident Rady Johnson, executive vice president and Pfizer’s chief compliance, quality and risk officer; Southporter John Kelly, vice president, quality operations and environment, health and safety, and Rob Goodwin, vice president and head of global product development operations’ Center of Excellence.

They’ll provide an in-depth look at the Pfizer vaccine, from the first days of research to manufacturing and distribution.

Click here to register for the free online event. Unfortunately, samples are not available.

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Speaking of vaccines: The Senior Center was a site yesterday. This was the scene.

If you are a glass-half-empty person, you’d see a long line.

If you’re glass-half-full, you’d think about all the folks who already got inside, and received shots.

(Photo/Ted Horowitz)

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And speaking still of vaccines:

According to State Senator Will Haskell, Connecticut has released more information the vaccination rollout, although all dates are tentative and largely dictated by federal supply chains. Individuals over the age of 75, health care workers, and seniors who reside in long term care facilities are currently eligible to receive the vaccine.

Individuals over the age of 65 will likely be able to sign up for their shots in early February. Frontline essential workers and adults with health conditions that put them at higher risk will be able to sign up in late February or early March. Future phases, which will include residents under the age of 65 who are not frontline workers and do not have high-risk conditions, are likely to go into effect in May and June.

According to state statistics, people over 75 make up just 8 percent of Connecticut’s population, yet represent just over 71 percent of all COVID deaths in the state. Those over the age of 70 also make up half of all COVID-19 hospitalizations in the state.

Meanwhile, individuals over 65, who represent 18 percent of the population, make up 88 percent of all deaths in the state. By focusing high-efficacy vaccine doses on this vulnerable population, Connecticut aims to save lives and reduce hospitalizations.

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The FBI has arrested another man accused of carrying several guns to Washington, for the insurrection at the Capitol.

Samuel Fisher lives on the Upper East Side. But he’s a 2007 graduate of Weston High School.

Using the name Brad Holiday, he’s got a series of YouTube videos and a website dedicated to sales and business.

But he also wrote provocative posts — like this one in which he predicted that on January 6 Ted Cruz and others would betray “Trump and We The People”; that “they will allow Antifa and BLM to run roughshot [sic] in the streets of D.C. and bear spray, search and arrest patriots,” or that perhaps if “1 million Patriots”  showed up for Donald Trump’s speech, he “just needs to fire the bat signal… deputize patriots… and then the pain comes.”

Fisher/Holiday had a handgun, rifle, shotgun, 1000 rounds of ammunition and 2 bulletproof vests when the FBI took him into custody.

He was not hard to find. He posted photos of himself inside the Capitol on social media, and was quoted in the Daily Beast: “It was awesome. It was dangerous and violent. People died … but it was fucking great if you ask me …. i got tear-gassed and pepper-sprayed.”

And now, arrested.

Click here for the full New York Post story.

Samuel Fisher in Washington on January 6.

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And finally …  The Apple Macintosh 128 — the first consumer computer to popularize a mouse, built-in screen and graphical user interface, bundled with the brand-new MacWrite and MacPaint — was introduced through a now-historic “1984” Ridley Scott Super Bowl XVIII ad.

Meanwhile, do I know what the #1 song was on January 22, 1984? Yes …

 

 

 

 

 

Amy Feder: Eldercare Concierge

Amy Feder has always found seniors fascinating. At weddings, she says, “I talk to the grandmother no one else pays attention to.”

Helping people is in her DNA. Her father was a child psychiatrist; her mother taught special ed.

Amy found her calling in social work. She earned a master’s from New York University, and is certified as a dementia practitioner and geriatric care manager.

She moved to Westport 20 years ago, and raised her children here. “This town has been so good to me,” she says. “I’ve never felt alone.”

Amy Feder

After working at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NYU Medical Center, Norwalk’s Family & Children’s Agency and, for the past 8 years, Jewish Senior Services as a care coordinator helping people stay in their own homes, Amy is now a private practitioner.

Her niche is eldercare and aging. She’s in the right place at the right time.

“I was getting calls from friends for help with elderly parents or spouses,” she says. “They needed knowledge, advocacy and support. I became a concierge for eldercare.”

Their questions were real, and crucial: How do I find an assisted living community? How do I talk to my parents about driving? How do I figure out the Medicare maze? I’m burned out from being a caregiver — can you help?

COVID has amplified senior issues. Isolation is bad enough; add the need for conversations about end-of-life care, and Amy has been busy since spring.

She has been pleased — but not surprised — by how well many senior have coped with the coronavirus. “They’re less restless than younger people,” Amy says. “They’re resilient.” Of course, isolation is tough for everyone, at any age.

Sometimes she consults for an hour. Other times she provides ongoing counseling.

Over the past several months, Amy has helped families set up technology for loved ones, to keep connected. She’s found communities where they can engage with others. She’s offered strategies to combat loneliness.

Y’s Men meetings are now held by Zoom. Amy Feder helps seniors and families set up technology, to stay connected.

Always, she listens. Often, Amy notes, “people just need someone to talk to.”

A while ago, she had to have end-of-life discussions with her own mother. They were painful, she admits. But Amy found solace that her mother died with “all of her wishes known.”

The pandemic hastened trends that Amy had already noticed, like telemedicine. She finds the future exciting — for seniors and their families.

She believes Westport is a “great town” for seniors. “The Senior Center is fabulous — it’s closed now, but they still run great programs. And there are plenty of resources all over town.”

Still, she adds, “we could use more senior housing. We’re an aging population, and this is an expensive town and state to age in.”

The Residence at Westport is our town’s first assisted living facility. Amy Feder says we need more senior housing options.

Having had a vaccine, Amy is available for home visits.

“It’s important to engage now and plan ahead,” she says. “No one wants to get into an emergency situation.”

(For more information click here, email amyfeder@optonline.net, or call 917-826-6660.)

Roundup: Old Mill Parking; GFA; Senior Center; More


Starting today, the Old Mill Beach parking lot is fully re-opened.

That means a reversion to previous rules: Parking is available for vehicles with beach emblems or hang tags, on a space available basis.

As in the past, Parks and Recreation Department staff will strictly enforce all parking regulations.


Greens Farms Academy has announced plans for in-person, on-campus instruction, 5 days a week, beginning September 1.

The private school on Beachside Avenue has spent the summer making numerous preparations — everything from changing physical spaces and furniture, to mandating one-way building pathways, to delivering lunch to assigned spaces.

One more change; There will be no formal uniform at GFA this year.

Meanwhile,  the fall sports season will look different this year. The Fairchester Athletic Association has canceled all regular season games and tournaments. The league cited “differing return-to- school plans and academic models” for its member schools, in light of COVID-19, as the reason.

However, GFA says, the league’s announcement does not preclude the school from scheduling interscholastic opportunities between and among like schools, if able.


The Senior Center is sponsoring 3 interesting events this month.

Next Thursday, August 6 (10 a.m., Zoom meeting), a Westport Weston Health District panel will discuss COVID-19 in Connecticut. Viewers can ask questions too. Click here for the link.

A Caregiver Support Group meets on Wednesdays (August 5 and 19, September 2 and 16, 10 a.m.). Positive Directons’ Terry Giegengack will facilitate the sessions. For more information, call Holly Betts (203-341-5096) or email hbetts@westportct.gov.

Friends of the Westport Center for Senior Activities hosts a free summer concert series in August and September. The stars are local musicians. First up (August 14, 1:30 p.m.): pianist Mathew Graybil, who has played around the world. He’ll feature works by Chopin, Schubert and Brahms. Click here for the Zoom link.

The Senior Center is closed. But programs continue.


At Staples High School, 2004 alum Charlie Stoebe was a soccer and track star (and captain). He graduated from Dartmouth College, and is now working with NBC Sports.

Charlie is multi-talented. In his spare COVID-related time, he created a new party game.

“What Was the Question?” tests how well you know your friends and family. But unlike most getting-to-know-you games, it starts not with a question, but an answer. Players must figure out the question. After each reveal there are fun discussions on the answer the player gave, and the predictions everyone else made.

“What Was the Question?” is now in Kickstarter mode. To help get it to market — and help out a really great Staples grad — click here.


And finally … Danish pianist Bent Fabricius-Bjerre died yesterday at 95. You may know him as Bent Fabric. Or maybe you just know his most famous song:

Unsung Hero #145

Alert — and grateful — “06880” reader Bob Weingarten writes:

Although the entire staff at the Senior Center should be recognized for their support during the pandemic, I would like to recognize one individual who has assisted many of us seniors on how to participate in the new online Senior Center programs. While doing that, he has also called seniors just to chat and ask about our health.

When COVID-19 struck, the Senior Center made over 30 programs available online. They range from yoga, tai chi, qigong and exercise classes to French language, current events, religion class and studio art.

To take an online class a participant needs a computer, email address and internet access. But having those resources means nothing, unless you know how to use them.

Jason Wilson, in a Zoom meeting.

Jason joined the Center full time last July, as assistant program manager. He has made it his mission to help seniors — and instructors — learn new technology skills.

When I had a problem accessing Zoom for one of my wife’s classes, Jason helped. He remained online to make sure no one else had any problems.

We should all be thankful to the entire staff at the Senior Center, including director Susan Pfister  and program manager Holly Betts. The doors may be closed, by Jason is helpful — and the staff provides phone coverage Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

(To nominate an Unsung Hero, email dwoog@optonline.net)

Senior Center Offers Online Classes

When the Senior Center closed earlier this month, the impact was felt by hundreds of Westporters.

But Senior Center staffers are as resourceful and resilient as the men and women who flocked there every day.

Over 30 programs are available — online, via Zoom — for the spring quarter. The list includes yoga, tai chi, qigong, essentrics, low and high impact exercise classes, French language, current events, religion and studio art.

Spring classes begin this Wednesday (April 1).  Scroll down for the complete list of offerings. (It’s formatted poorly — but that’s the best I could do. Sorry!)

All that’s needed to take an online class is a computer, email address and access to the internet. To register, seniors (age 60 and over) should call 203-341-5099 weekdays, between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. (That’s the number for questions too.)

The Senior Center is closed. But classes are offered online.

A few writing classes have already begun online. Participants were thrilled to see their classmates — and begin writing again.

In addition, the Senior Center created a YouTube channel, with links to free videos in a variety of subjects.

They’ll post a weekly documentary film on the channel, along with some of their free classes.

The most popular — the aerobic chair class — is on it too.

Click here for the link YouTube channel. After opening the page, you can subscribe to the YouTube channel by clicking the red button on the upper right.

Senior Center director Sue Pfister adds this message:

My staff and I are doing our best to keep seniors mentally and spiritually stimulated, physically challenged and engaged during these unprecedented times.

I’m so impressed with everyone’s willingness to jump on board virtually, and make the best out of this otherwise frightening time. I know if we continue to be creative, flexible and open-minded we will get through this and come out wiser, stronger, more compassionate and more appreciative of our community.

Stay home, stay safe.  I miss you all terribly.

Bringing the Outdoors In Thurs. 1:00 pm. Chris Goldbach 4/2-6/25 $48
Still Life Thurs. 4:00 pm. Chris Goldbach 4/2-6/25 $48
Drawing Flowers Fri. 10:00 am. Dick Rauh 5/22-6/26 $24
Blending Pastels Fri. 10:00 am. Lisa Arnold 4/3-5/15 $28
Advanced Drawing & Watercolor Tues. 10:00 am. Tom Scippa 4/7-6/30 $52
Current Events Fri. 12:45 pm. Lila Wells 4/3-5/22 free
Book Talk: Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths about Science and Religion Mon 10:30 am. Part 1 Linda Bruce 4/6-5/11 $24
Book Talk: Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths about Science and Religion Mon 10:30 am. Part 2 Linda Bruce 5/18-6/15 $24
Writers Workshop Tues 9:30  FULL Jan Bassin 4/7-6/30 $96
Writers Workshop Tues 1:30  FULL Jan Bassin 4/7-6/30 $96
Writers Workshop Wed. 10:30 am. FULL Jan Bassin 4/1-6/24 $96
Writers Workshop Thurs 9:30 am. FULL Jan Bassin 4/2-6/25 $96
Writers Workshop Thurs 1:30 pm. Jan Bassin 4/2-6/25 $96
Learn to Play the Ukulele Tues. 1:00 pm. Uncle Zac 4/7-6/30 $52
Intermediate French Wed. 1:00 pm. Nell Mednick 4/1-6/24 $52
Conversational French Wed. 10:30 am. Nell Mednick 4/1-6/24 $52
Essentrics Mon. 11:00 am. Dyan DeCastro 4/6-6/29 $48
Zumba Gold Wed. 10:30 am. Karen Liss 4/1-6/24 $52
Tai Chi Beginner’s Wed. 10:00 am. Mari Lewis 4/1-6/24 $52
Tai Chi Reinforcement Mon. 10:45 am. Mari Lewis 4/6-6/29 $48

 

Guided Qigong Mon. 2:10 pm Deby Goldenberg 4/6-6/29 $48
Cardio Strength Fri. 9:30 am. Shelley Moll 4/3-6/26 $52
Weights in Motion Mon. 9:30 am. Shelley Moll 4/6-6/29 $48
Dance & Stretch Tues. 1:00 PM. Sandy Adamcyzk 4/7-6/30 $48
Dance & Stretch Wed. 1:00 PM. Sandy Adamcyzk 4/1-6/24 $48
Strength Training Mon. 1:00 pm Sandy Adamcyzk 4/6-6/22 $36
Strength Training Fri. 10:00 am Sandy Adamcyzk 4/3-6/26 $44
Yoga Total Health Mon. 8:45 am. Denise O’Hearn 4/6-6/29 $48
Yoga Total Health Wed. 8:45 am. Denise O’Hearn 4/1-6/24 $52
Yoga Total Health Fri. 8:45 am. Denise O’Hearn 4/3-6/26 $52
Yoga/Core Strength Sat. 10:00 am. Maria Vailakis-Wippick 4/4-6/27 $52
Yoga Gentle Sat 11:15 am Maria Vailakis-Wippick 4/4-6/27 $52
Yoga Beginning Thurs. 3:00 pm. Maria Vailakis-Wippick 4/2-6/25 $52
Yoga Wellbeing Tues 7:45 am. Paula Schooler 4/7-6/30 $52
Yoga for Wellness Sat 8:45 am. Paula Schooler 4/4-6/27 $52
Yoga for Brain Longevity Thurs. Noon Paula Schooler 4/2-6/25 $52
Therapeutic Yoga Thurs. 7:45 am. Paula Schooler 4/2-6/25 $52

Unsung Hero #118

Little things mean a lot.

For many years, Gerry Cataldo has worked at the Senior Center. His is a thankless — and often unnoticed — job.

Gerry sets up each room for meetings, educational programs, games, lunches, exercise activities and more.

When he’s not moving partitions, tables, chairs, and sports equipment, he’s cleaning halls and restrooms. When he’s not doing that, he’s helping any way else he can.

Gerry Cataldo makes sure that everyone at the Senior Center has a ball. Or two.

Every day — Monday through Saturday — 30 to 50 different events take place at the Senior Center. Gerry makes sure that each one is ready to go.

When it’s done, he makes sure the next one follows smoothly.

Senior Center regulars and staff know they could not function without him. Gerry Cataldo is truly an Unsung Hero!

(Hat tip: Bob Weingarten. To nominate an Unsung Hero, email dwoog@optonline.net)