Tag Archives: Brian McGunagle

Ruth Steinkraus Pride Lights: Possible Vandalism Investigated

The colorful balloons that turned the Ruth Steinkraus Cohen Bridge lights into rainbow decorations during Pride month may have been vandalized.

This morning Brian McGunagle — founder of Westport Pride — noticed that most of the lights on the south side were missing balloons. Several lights were damaged too.

Lights on the north side of the bridge were intact.

He contacted Westport Police, who are investigating.

Colored balloons were removed from these, and a number of other, lights on the Ruth Steinkraus Cohen Bridge.

McGunagle says, “Hate has no home in Westport, and Westport Pride will continue to pursue its mission of radical welcome in our community despite any acts of vandalism.”

The Westport Downtown Association promised to replace the balloons today — and every time going forward, if necessary.

The potential bias crime comes less than a week after Westport Pride held its first rally on Jesup Green, just around the corner from the bridge.

Pride lights earlier this week, on the north side of the Ruth Steinkraus Cohen Bridge.

 

Unsung Hero #194

Last weekend’s LGBT Pride celebration on Jesup Green was a fantastic community event.

Singers sang upbeat, positive songs. Staples students held signs, held hands, and spoke with strength and clarity about how it feels to be openly gay. Young kids had their faces and nails painted. Same-sex couples embraced. A gay father held his 2-year-old son, as First Selectman Jim Marpe read a ringing proclamation.

Meanwhile – for the first time ever – a rainbow flag flew over Westport’s old, venerable and very beautiful Jesup Green.

None of it would have been possible without Brian McGunagle.

Brian McGunagle and his son Henry, with First Selectman Jim Marpe at last Saturday’s LGBTQ Pride celebration at Jesup Green. The town’s leader read a proclamation — and wore a rainbow tie. (Photo/Kerry Long)

From a germ of an idea last fall — what would it mean to have an LGBTQ organization in Westport? — he created, in less time than it takes to birth a baby, a townwide celebration of pride and joy.

But that’s not all.

Brian’s vision, leadership and boots-on-the-ground work were the impetus for the lighting of the Ruth Steinkraus Cohen Bridge this entire month. Lawn signs that are sprouting everywhere. The summer-long  “Merchants of Pride” promotions.

And much more.

Brian did not do it all alone, of course. Dozens of folks helped: his friends, oldtime Westporters and newcomers, straight and gay parents, and an astonishingly creative, active, visionary and fun crew of Staples High School students (inspired by biology teacher and Gender Sexuality Alliance advisor Kayla Iannetta).

But Brian was the driving force. He brought everyone together, oversaw countless Zoom meetings, did the grunt work, and moved mountains to make it happen.

He did it all too while holding down a fulltime job. And studying for the Episcopal priesthood.

John F. Kennedy said that victory has a thousand fathers (and defeat is an orphan). Brian McGunagle — proud gay father of 2-year-old Henry — is this week’s Unsung Hero.

And — hey, why not, since this is June — let’s call him Father of the Year too!

(Do you know an Unsung Hero? Email dwoog@optonline.net)

Pride Comes To Westport

June will be so gay in Westport.

Around the world, Pride Month — commemorating one of the first uprisings against police raids on gay bars, at the Stonewall Inn in June 1969 — is celebrated with parades, festivals, discussions and more.

Next month, Pride comes to Westport.

Actually, it’s already here. Formed just 5 months ago, a new group — Westport Pride — has developed an ambitious slate of events for June.

With dozens of members, from teenagers through grandparents — and hundreds of followers on social media — Westport Pride’s goal is to raise the visibility of LGBTQ residents and issues; increase understanding; provide mentors; inspire future leaders, and share the LGBTQ community’s culture and accomplishments.

They’ll do it with an array of events. Some are live, some virtual. Some will be educational; others, fun. All are important.

Westport Pride kicks off June 2 (7 p.m., Zoom) with a discussion on the past, present and future of LGBT life here. Panelists include Pride founder Brian McGunagle, Staples High School Gender Sexuality Alliance faculty advisor Kayla Iannetta, and members of that GSA. The moderator is … me. Click here for the link.

On June 4, Staples High celebrates Pride. The day-long event includes music, buttons, and an art show featuring submissions from Staples’ LGBTQ community. Rainbow attire is welcomed.

The original rainbow flag. Other colors have been added, symbolizing transgender issues and the AIDS crisis.

The next day — Saturday, June 5 (10 a.m. to noon) — is the Big One. The entire town is invited to Jesup Green for a Pride Rally. Youth (and non-youth) will speak, sing and perform. Clergy and political leaders will join together (with 1st Selectman Jim Marpe issuing a Pride Month proclamation).  A rainbow flag will fly, and there will be children’s art activities too.

On Sunday, June 6 (5 p.m.), Christ & Holy Trinity Episcopal Church hosts a Pride Eucharist service, with scripture, song and prayer in the courtyard.

Westport elementary schools get in the spirit on June 15 with “You Be You Spirit Day.”  Begun by a Coleytown Elementary School student in 2019, it’s a celebration of what makes each child special.

This year’s theme is “What Makes You Shine?” Activities include a Staples student-created video, suggested book readings, and a self-portrait art project. Children (and parents) can proudly wear “You Be You” t-shirts and other apparel (click here to purchase).

MoCA Westport celebrates Pride June 25 through August 21 with “Love Wins.” The exhibit highlights the issues, themes and conversations of the local LGBTQ community, and beyond. Featured artists include Staples graduate Noah Fox, and a mural designed by Staples senior Poppy Livingstone.

All month, a large banner — designed by Staples senior Claire Hanley — will hang on the Ruth Steinkraus Cohen Bridge (which will be lit by rainbow lights). The project was a collaboration between Staples’ GSA and the Westport Downtown Association.

Baker Graphics offers Westport Pride lawn signs, with a “Pride in Town/Pride in Each Other” message. They’re available at the 1753 Post Road East location, at a Pride-special $10 price.

JL Rocks is one of many local businesses supporting Westport Pride.

Other businesses are joining too. A “Summer of Love/Merchants of Pride” promotion with Pride-themed items and events includes JL Rocks, Savvy + Grace, WEST, Franny’s Farmacy, Fourth & Pride Vodka, Bespoke Designs, Le Rouge by Aarti, Purpose 2 Purchase, Rosebud Slumber Parties, Grammie’s, JoyRide, Norwalk Crossfit, The Row House, Pure Barre, Amis Trattoria, The Whelk and Don Memo.

But Westport Pride is not stopping after Pride Month. In the works: a Book Club discussion with the Westport Library about the true crime story “Last Call,” a killer who preyed upon gay men (July 22; click here); a panel with the Westport Weston Clergy Association; events for Coming Out Day in October, and more.

Westport has a long LGBTQ history. The Brook was one of the first gay bars in the area — and, when it closed in 2011, the oldest continually operating one in the country.

Staples sponsored the first Gay Straight Alliance of any public school in Connecticut.

A Staples High School GSA bulletin board near the cafeteria provides education and history.

Fairfield County’s inaugural Gay Pride celebration was held at the Unitarian Church. It, and other religious institutions, have been strong proponents for inclusion for years.

What’s happening now builds on that past. It honors the present, and empowers the future.

I’ll be proud to see you on Jesup Green — and everywhere else — next month.

PRIDE PS: Senior Ben Zack says, “I believe we are working toward the very important mission of educating people, creating acceptance and celebrating the LGBTQ community in our town. Even more importantly, we are setting the groundwork so that youth who are questioning have a place to turn, an organization that supports them and helps reduce the struggles they go through because of fear of accepting who they are.”

Westporter Asks: Where Is The LGBTQ Community?

When Brian McGunagle and his family moved from Rye, New York 4 years ago, they looked at places like Greenwich, Darien and Norwalk.

But it was Westport that most attracted them. McGunagle and his husband Stephen Gustafson liked the town’s progressive, artistic history. The fact that the Brook Cafe opened as a gay bar around 1931, and flourished here for 7 decades, was particularly intriguing.

McGunagle and Gustafson have been happy here. Their 21-month-old son Henry is flourishing in daycare.

Still, when they joined a “new parents” group through Willows Pediatrics, they wondered if they’d be the the only same-sex couple.

They met 2 families in which the husbands were transgender. They learned about a Facebook group for LGBTQ parents that facilitated playdates. Through that, they met several same-sex partners.

Steve Gustafson, Henry and Brian McGunagle go pumpkin picking.

But McGunagle — who works in the energy sector, while studying to become an Episcopal priest — wants more than a quiet, open suburb.

“As one of Westport’s growing same-sex couple families,” he says, “I want to ensure that our community is visible.” He also hopes to provide models to people who are “questioning or awakening to their own sexuality.”

For 30 years, the Triangle Community Center in Norwalk has served the Fairfield County LGBTQ community. There’s a center in New Haven too, and of course plenty of resources in New York City.

Closer to home, Westport’s Unitarian Church has long supported LGBTQ causes, including meetings and programming.

McGunagle’s idea is to complement what exists, with a uniquely Westport spin.

Among his ideas:

  • Celebrating Pride Month in June with a parade and festivities on the Ruth Steinkraus Cohen Bridge, and at the Levitt Pavilion
  • Honoring our LGBTQ history and famous community members through the Westport Museum for History & Culture
  • Designing a rainbow crosswalk downtown
  • Creating programs and resources for people coming out at any age, singles, same-sex families, families with LGBTQ members, those who are transgender or gender fluid, seniors.=
  • Rallying allies
  • Partnering with Staples High School’s Gender Sexuality Alliance
  • Providing mentor opportunities.

“Do those ideas resonate? Is anyone interested?” McGunagle asks.

He hopes to hear feedback. He particularly hopes it is cross-generational.

McGunagle knows there are many individuals like him, and families like his, living quietly in Westport. Now he wants to find them, and bring them together for support, education and excitement.

To learn more, email westportctpride@gmail.com.