Tag Archives: Eva Amurri

Roundup: La Plage, Indigo Wellness, Ed Van Gelder …

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La Plage — the Longshore Inn restaurant — is much more than a summer place.

They’re offering prix fixe holiday menus that reflect holiday traditions, while incorporating “coastal flavors.”

The Christmas Eve (4 to 10 p.m.) and Christmas Day (noon to 6:30 p.m.) menus ($79 per person) include starters like crispy Copps Island oysters with green tomato remoulade, and Maine lobster mosaic; entrees such as Stonington sea scallops risotto and Alen Brother filet mignon; and desserts like Christmas trifle and Connecticut maple syrup panna cotta. Click here for the full menu.

New Year’s Eve features an a la carte menu, with the first seating from 4 to 6:30 p.m.

There’s dancing and a 5-course prix fixe menu ($175 per person) from 8 to 10 p.m. Specialties include wild salmon tartare, Périgord truffle salad, local black sea bass a la plancha, and crispy duck breast. Click here for the New Year’s Eve menu

New Year’s Day brunch is served a la carte, from noon to 2:30 p.m.

Click here for reservations, or call 203-684-6232.

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The third time’s the charm for Indigo Wellness Group.

When Sarah Swanberg owned her first acupuncture location in Stamford, many customers came from Westport. They urged her to open here.

Right before COVID struck, she signed a lease near Terrain. She never opened — and closed her Stamford studio for 3 months, too.

Then she found a space by the Delamar Hotel in Southport. But that didn’t feel right either.

Then Roger Leifer offered an office at the Willows medical complex, on Kings Highway North at Wilton Road. Indigo offers acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine, with a focus on women’s health, fertility and pregnancy, insomnia, anxiety, headaches and chronic pain.

Indigo also offers facial cosmetic acupuncture and micro needling, pelvic floor physical therapy, virtual nutrition consultations and online courses.

Sarah loves Westport. She’s been welcomed by the community.

Last month she was also welcomed by Governor Lamont, when he toured local businesses with actress and social media influencer (and Westporter) Eva Amurri. Click below to see:

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In case you missed the previous notice: A memorial service for Julie Belaga — our former state representative, gubernatorial candidate, regional EPA administrator and Export-Import Bank director — is set for 10 a.m. on December 19, at the Westport Library.

She was one of Westport’s great public servants — and a wonderful woman too.

Julie Belaga

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Longtime Westport resident Edgar Louis Van Gelder died Thanksgiving Day at his residence in Meadow Ridge in Georgetown. He was 98 years old.

He spent his childhood in Hilversum, Holland with his sister Ada and brother Joost. His family fled the Nazi regime, and arrived in the US in 1939.

After graduating from Windsor Mountain School in Vermont, Ed enlisted in the Royal Netherlands Army Air Force. After training in Jackson, Mississippi he was assigned to the No. 18 (NEI) Squadron RAAF. They fought in the South Pacific against Japanese occupation of what was then the Dutch East Indies (Indonesia).

As a navigator Ed took part in over 40 bombing raids, facing heavy enemy defenses. The squadron was based on the northern coast of Australia under American-British-Dutch-Australian Command. After the war, he transported prisoners from Japanese internment camps. For his service, Queen Juliana awarded him the Silver Flying Cross of the Netherlands.

After discharge, Ed attended New York University. He soon joined the Van Gelder-Fanto Corporation in Manhattan, specializing in pharmaceuticals. In 1958 he became a full partner. With his partner Stan Hier, he expanded the business to become a global competitor.

In 1949 Ed married Inge Lange. She was born in Germany, but as a small child in 1927 immigrated to the US with her mother. The couple lived first in Tarrytown, New York,, then moved to Westport in 1952. In 1961 they purchased the Guyer Farm on Hillspoint Road, and spent the next half century refurbishing the house and barn.

A businessman, husband, father, passionate sailor and aviator, Ed spent his retirement traveling with his wife. His most memorable voyage was to Antarctica on a Russian research vessel. Ed and Inge were active members of the Westport Community Theater throughout the 1960’s. After his retirement, they delivered Meals on Wheels.

He became a member of the Y’s Men, and was elected to Westport’s Planning & Zoning Commission.

Ed was predeceased by his wife and siblings. He is survived by his son Jeff, daughter Caroline, and grandsons Robin, Alex and Erin.

Ed Van Gelder

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Sure, the holidays are hectic. Hopefully, you can take a few moments and “reflect” on today’s “Westport … Naturally” photo:

(Photo/Amy Schneider)

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And finally … in honor of our new acupuncture spot, Indigo Wellness:

Kyle Martino: Lessons And Love Learned From A Miscarriage

Kyle Martino may be the best player in Staples soccer history. As a Wrecker senior in 1999, he was named Gatorade National Player of the Year. He went on to star at the University of Virginia; was named 2002 MLS Rookie of the Year with the Columbus Crew; played 8 times for the US national team, and is now a noted Premier League analyst on NBC Sports.

But this post has nothing to do with soccer. Recently, Martino and his wife — actress Eva Amurri — lost their 2nd child in a miscarriage.

Eva — the daughter of Susan Sarandon — blogs regularly about her active, intriguing and holistic life. She has been very public about her miscarriage, hoping to raise awareness about that often-taboo topic. Last week, she asked Kyle to contribute his own insights.

Here are his sometimes painful, always loving thoughts:

“I lost the baby…”

Kyle Martino and Eva Amurri

Kyle Martino and Eva Amurri

There’s no way to prepare for those words. I was standing in line to check in to my hotel – the same mindless task I sleepwalk through every weekend – when my phone rang.

Hearing those words from Eva’s mouth, I sprung awake from my traveler’s daze.

The first emotion I felt was guilt. Of course this happened while I was away – every time Eva needs me most I seem to be on a plane or in a different time zone.

Almost instantly came anger. Her phrase repeated in my head, over and over, in my ears and my soul.

Years of shielding myself from emotional discomfort has trained me to move immediately to logic. So I began the calming method of systematically breaking down the sentence I kept hearing over and over. “Baby…The Baby…lost the baby…I lost the baby…”

It was her fault. I was overcome with a quick wave of judgment and blame. Why did she let this happen? What did she do wrong? Why did she let me get on that plane?

Anger – that hollow, pointless emotion was the shield I held so not to feel what I knew I couldn’t handle.

Holding on to that anger distracted me from the actual emotion I was feeling: sadness. I wasn’t mad at Eva at all. I was mad that I wasn’t there in the moment she needed me more than ever.

I walked over to a couch in the lobby and let this sink in. I cried for the first time in my adult life. (Don’t worry, my therapist is all over that one.) I cried because Eva said “I.” “I lost the baby.”

When Eva Amurri was pregnant with their 1st child, her husband Kyle tweeted, "#babygirl Martino's 1st red carpet."

When Eva Amurri was pregnant with their 1st child, her husband Kyle tweeted, “#babygirl Martino’s 1st red carpet.”

Of course she didn’t lose the baby. This wasn’t her fault. There was nothing she could do. In fact, she couldn’t have done more to make sure her body was the healthiest it could be to nurture life. It broke my heart that she felt responsible in that very first moment of grief. And I didn’t understand why she couldn’t see what I did: that having a healthy baby is a miracle, and we can’t choose when and where that miracle happens.

Those feelings continued through the immediate aftermath of the miscarriage. While she rewound the tape on her pregnancy and looked for errors, I appreciated her body for doing the right thing by closing the book on a miracle not meant to be.

We were on totally different pages – which drove a wedge between us. It’s the same difference that existed when Eva was pregnant with our daughter.

Eva made a connection with Marlowe well before I did. A tangible bond that only those 2 people can understand. Eva and Marlowe were soul mates the second she heard that heart beat (Eva would probably say even before that).

Being honest, I never really accepted that we were having a child until a 3rd trimester ultrasound showed Marlowe waving at the camera. It hit me in that moment that I would be a father. But Eva had long been a mother already.

Kyle Martino and Marlowe.

Kyle Martino and Marlowe.

When she called me with the shattering news of this pregnancy, she already knew her baby and had been taking care of it. In Eva’s mind she was already the mother of 2. That connection, the bond, was broken that day – and Eva was devastated.

I know that losing our child was not Eva’s fault, but I understand now why she felt it was. Miscarriage is a very isolating experience. Eva withdrew for a while after it happened. I tried to be there for her, but I wasn’t able to relate to her specific pain. My heart was broken in a different way– and nothing I could do or say helped. It was only when Eva decided to do something very brave, in her saddest moment, that the cloud over us lifted. Eva decided she needed to talk about it…with everyone.

Eva told our story on her blog. She put our heartache out there for all to read.

At first I thought it was a bad idea. I thought miscarriage was a rare misfortune, and the few who experienced it suffered privately with curtains drawn. As far as I knew, miscarriage wasn’t something you talked about.

No one had ever mentioned to me that they had been through it. I had never read of someone’s personal experience. Was it really safe and smart to tell so many people such intimate truths about your pain?

I didn’t voice my concerns about sharing because I had been so inept at providing support in those crucial moments so far. I knew I needed to support whatever desire she had. The decision had been made.

Kyle Martino is one of NBC's top analysts on English Premier League broadcasts.

Kyle Martino is one of NBC’s top analysts on English Premier League broadcasts.

Eva’s post went live, and we sat there silently. I could sense there was a weight lifted off her, but I feared the response could reverse the initially positive effects.

Immediately, support poured in. I’m not talking about the “I’m sorry for your loss, I can’t imagine how hard that is” support (although that was very much appreciated).

I’m talking about the “we’ve been there ourselves, we are here for you if you need us” support. I was blown away by how many readers wrote back with their own deeply sad stories of pregnancy loss.

Then the phone started ringing. Some of my closest friends revealed to me, one by one, their own experiences with miscarriage. These were people I speak to every day, but I never had a clue.

It felt so good to talk about what we were going through. The fact that others not only knew what we were going through, but had found a way past it, was uplifting. What had felt like an action that would add shame to our heartbreak turned out to be the most cathartic experience imaginable.

I could be honest and talk with friends about the guilt I still carried for my earlier feelings of blame; the insecurity I felt about not hurting the same way as Eva did; the worry I still shoulder that it could happen to us again.

A community began, a conduit through which sadness, regret, hope, gratitude and love flowed freely.

At our wedding, Eva’s mom said something that really struck me at the time. She told us, “We are your tribe. Use us.” In the aftermath of our loss, we established a new community – a reformulation of our relationships with those already a part of it, and the addition of people met through our shared experiences.

At his wedding, Kyle Martino's new mother-in-law Susan Sarandon gave advice he's never forgotten.

At his wedding, Kyle Martino’s new mother-in-law Susan Sarandon gave advice he’s never forgotten.

We used this community to get through the hardest moment of our marriage. I accessed a lot of understanding through my discussions with other dads, and Eva gained a lot of strength from the strength of the women who came before her in their own grieving processes.

The encouragement, compassion and love we received from important people around us gave us the courage to turn back to each other for support, and heal the disconnect that was weakening our marriage.

As with many of our struggles, we came out the other side stronger together in our loss than we could ever be apart.

I will never feel the same way as Eva about losing our baby. I have my experience, and she has hers. I have my process, and she has hers.

I don’t think about it often – but Eva does. She thinks about the baby we lost every day. And so we move forward, 2 broken hearts on the mend– with a beautiful miracle of a child by our side, and one other just out of our reach.

(To read more of Eva Amurri’s blog, click here.)