Tag Archives: Westport Unitarian Church

Roundup: Bowtie Cinema, Leveling The Field, Melissa & Doug, More


Movie theaters — remember them?! — are back.

The Bow Tie “Ultimate Royale” multiplex on US 1 — just over the border in Norwalk — reopens tomorrow. Features include “Monster Hunter,” “The Croods,” “Wild Mountain Thyme,” “Elf,” The Midnight Sky,” “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation,” “Honest Thief” and “Tenet.”

The experience will be different than in pre-pandemic days. For example:

  • 100% reserved seating …
  • … but only 50% capacity
  • A temporary waiver of all advanced ticketing fees
  • Selling seats in an alternating pattern so each customer has an empty seat on either side
  • Contact-free purchasing of tickets and concession items
  • Mandatory face masks (unless eating or drinking at your seat)
  • Plexiglas barriers at box office and concession
  • Frequent cleaning
  • Limitations on restroom and lobby capacities.

You can also book a private movie party” for up to 20 guests.

No word on whether you will still pay $22 for a 10-pound box of Jujubes. (Hat tip: Mark Mathias)


Christmas caroling — remember that?! — returns to the Unitarian Church this Saturday (December 19, 3 to 4 p.m.).

It’s COVID-conscious of course: in the large parking lot, with masks and social distancing required.

In Unitarian spirit, there will be a mix of secular songs and Christmas carols. Everyone will use phone flashlights to sing “Silent Night” at dusk. Feel free to bring an instrument too!.

In the holiday spirit, if you want to join but don’t want to actually join people, email events@uuwestport.org for the Zoom link.

Not quite the Unitarian Church parking lot, but you get the idea.


Chloe Hackett is a Staples High School sophomore. She’s an athlete too.

As she and her family searched for a way to help others during the pandemic, they found Leveling the Playing Field. The non-profit seemed perfect.

It collect new and gently used sports and playground equipment, then distribute it to needy youth organizations. And it was founded by Syracuse University alums — Chloe’s parents’ alma mater.

“My sisters and I play field hockey, ice hockey and softball year round,” Chloe says.

“Sports have taught us teamwork, discipline, commitment, determination and how to compete. They’ve given us an after-school outlet, and the opportunity to make friends. We are fortunate to live in an amazing town with so many opportunities, access to a wide variety of sports and the equipment to play them.”

This weekend (Saturday and Sunday, December 19-20, 10 a.m. to noon, at The Granola Bar), the Hacketts are collecting donations.

Cleats, field hockey sticks, lacrosse equipment, bats, hockey skates, footballs, softball gloves — it will all make a difference. Click here for a full list of acceptable and non-acceptable items.

If you can’t make it this weekend, the Hacketts have your back. They’ll leave a box in front of the restaurant, and make pickups daily.

The Hackett girls already have donations! From left: Alex, Chloe, Daisy. (Photo/Julianne Mulvey)


Melissa & Doug — the international toy company, and the Westport couple named the Bernsteins behind it — keep a low profile.

The company (and the couple) do many good things, out of the limelight. Here’s one that deserves notice.

They’ve partnered with the Whole Foods, selling toys in stores and online. Between December 20-24, 1% of sales at Whole Foods will support Whole Kids Foundation’s child nutrition programs.

Stock up on good food and great toys. And help children eat well. Melissa & Doug — and kids you’ll never know — will thank you. (Hat tip: Johanna Rossi)


Westport abstract expressionist painter David Stephen Johnson made his European debut earlier this year.

To share in his good fortune — and do his part to help local first responders — from now through mid-January, he is donating all proceeds of his Works on Paper sales to Norwalk Hospital.

Click here for some of the Works on Paper that make original, thoughtful holiday gifts (and support the community).

More of Johnson’s pieces can be viewed at his Compo Beach studio, by (socially distanced) appointment. Email studio@davidstephenjohnson.com, or call 970- 376-5058.

To see other works, click here or follow hisInstagram page: @david.stephen.johnson.art.

David Stephen Johnson


And finally … on this date in 1865, Franz Schubert’s “Unfinished Symphony” premiered. The composer died nearly 40 years earlier, from either typhoid fever or syphilis. Just 31, he had composed more than 600 vocal works, 7 complete symphonies, sacred music and operas, along with piano and chamber music.

Pic Of The Day #1107

Westport Unitarian Church,  looking northwest from inside the sanctuary.
The flaming chalice — suspended here — is a symbol of the faith. (Photo/David Vita)

Labyrinth Day Election Walk

Stressed out by all the rhetoric leading up to Election Day? Bombarded by mailings, assaulted by robocalls?

The Westport Unitarian Church invites residents of all political persuasions — and none — to an Election Day labyrinth.

Open from 12 noon to 8 p.m. this Tuesday (November 6) at the handsome sanctuary on 10 Lyons Plains Road, the Blue Lotus Peace Labyrinth experience also includes contemplative music.

A typical labyrinth

According to the church, labyrinth walking is deeply calming. It challenges and shifts walkers’ perspectives.

Labyrinths are ancient and ubiquitous. They’re part of cultures and faith traditions from the early Americas to pre-Christian Europe, from Africa to India and ancient Greece.

NOTE: Labyrinths are not mazes — which are designed to get lost in. Labyrinths have only one path in to the center.

For more information, call 203-227-7205, ext. 14.

Unitarians Say: “Let’s Put On A Show”

Judy Garland, Mickey Rooney — and countless generations of kids in basements, attics and garages before and after them — have had the same creative, what-have-we-got-to-lose idea: “Hey, let’s put on a show!”

Jim Luongo is no kid. But 10 years ago the veteran  English and theater teacher had the same idea.

He was a longtime member of Westport’s Unitarian Church. So he contacted fellow congregants, found a cast and crew, and produced Doubt right there on Lyons Plains Road.

It was a hit. The next year, Luongo put on another show.

Jim Luongo, at the Westport Unitarian Church.

He’s been doing it ever since. Among his credits: Proof, The Curious Savage, Rabbit Hole, Dancing at Lughnasa, The (Female) Odd Couple, and American Daughter.

There’s no budget. Sets and costumes come from actors and techies’ homes and closets.

But the UU Players’ plays are now the church’s second biggest annual fundraiser. (The August tag sale is first.)

“We’re better than we have any right to be,” says actor Sarah Bell. The 14-year Coleytown Middle School educator and self-described “wannabe actor” calls Luongo “a great director.”

But, she adds, “no one else is in charge. We figure things out ourselves, together.”

The still-ad hoc troupe does not, she admits, advertise well. They’re happy just to have fun, performing in front of friends, family and church members.

Now, however, they want everyone to know about this weekend’s show.

Bakersfield Mist is based on a true story. Bell plays a bartender living in a trailer park who buys the ugliest picture she can find, for a friend’s birthday. It’s relegated to a tag sale, where an art teacher identifies it as a possible Pollack.

A snooty art authenticator comes to the trailer to inspect it. The play is stinging, funny and challenging.

Sarah Bell and Tom Croarkin examine a “Jackson Pollack” painting in “Bakersfield Mist.”

One reason the UU Players want broader audiences to know about Bakersfield is because it’s Luongo’s last play.

After a decade, the director is stepping down.

“He’s given us so much,” Bell says. “It’s time people heard about him.”

And about the UU Players, who really do put on a show.

(“Bakersfield Mist” will be performed at the Westport Unitarian Church, 10 Lyons Plains Road, on Friday and Saturday, November 2 and 3, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, November 4, at 3 p.m. Tickets are available at the door. The suggested donation is $20.)

Remembering Denny Davidoff

Denny Davidoff — a Westporter and pioneering advertising agency owner whose work with the Unitarian Universalist church helped shape liberal religion in North America, and inter-religious dialogue globally — died on December 7.

She was 85. In July she was diagnosed with metastatic melanoma in her brain.

Denny moved to Westport in 1959 with her husband Jerry — a lawyer and civil liberties advocate. They knew the town well: Both their parents had summer homes here.

In 1960 Denny joined Westport’s Unitarian Church. She became a leader locally, then nationally, fighting for gender equity and against racism. In 1973 she was chosen to be president of Unitarian Universalism’s Women’s  Federation. Her work helped lead to pioneering gender-inclusive language.

From 1992 to 2000 — as moderator, the highest lay position in national leadership — Denny wielded the gavel in what the church itself calls “sometimes unruly” debates. She preached in more than 100 congregations, and mentored generations of ministers and lay leaders.

Denise Davidoff speaks at this year’s General Assembly in New Orleans, her 50th consecutive annual meeting. (Photo/copyright Christopher L. Walton)

Denny held many other leadership positions. Until her illness, she worked for Meadville-Lombard Theological School in Chicago, supporting development of new UU ministers.

Denny was a board member and founder of the Interfaith Alliance, and its foundation. As a director of the Alban Institute, she consulted for congregations of many denominations.

Besides her role in religion, Denny was a leader in Connecticut business and politics. She founded her ad agency in Fairfield in the mid-1960s — the “Mad Men” era. She specialized in advertising for financial institutions.

Denny volunteered for non-profits, including the Westport Library, the NEON anti-poverty agency, and a mental health association in Norwalk. Her longest community service — beginning in 1992, and lasting to her death — was as a director and executive community member of The WorkPlace, helping create and manage programs in Connecticut and nationally.

Denny graduated from Vassar College. After running errands during the 1952 Democratic convention, she remained active in politics — and met her future husband on an election campaign.

In 2006 Jerry and Denny Davidoff received the Award for Distinguished Service to the Cause of Unitarian Universalism. (Photo/copyright Nancy Pierce)

Denny served on the Westport Democratic Town Committee, and ran ad campaigns for candidates throughout Fairfield County. She also provided advertising for Ella Grasso, the first American woman elected governor without being married to a previous governor.

She and Jerry enjoyed cruising the New England coast on their 38-foot sailboat. At home, she played show tunes and classical compositions on the piano. Jerry died in 2009.

Denny is survived by her sons Douglass of Bridgeport and John of Evanston, Illinois, and 4 grandchildren. A memorial service is set for February 3 (3 p.m.). Of course, it will be held at Westport’s Unitarian Church, on Lyons Plains Road.

 

5 Years After Sandy Hook: Candlelight Vigil Remembers — And Demands Action

Mark Barden lost his son Daniel in the Sandy Hook massacre. He will play guitar; his high school daughter Natalie will sing.

Speakers will include survivors of gun violence, from around the area. A gospel choir will sing.

Of course, candles will burn.

The event is a vigil next Sunday (December 10, 4:30 p.m., Westport Unitarian Church).

Sponsored by the church, Defendemocracy.com, Sandy Hook Promise and CT Against Gun Violence, it’s part of a nationwide effort to remember the 5th anniversary of that awful day — and enact meaningful change.

 

Westporter Darcy Hicks is one of the organizers. She says, “This vigil is one of hundreds across the country this week. We believe the best way to honor the half million people killed by guns since the Sandy Hook shooting is to insist on common sense gun legislation. The ongoing failure of Congress to take action is inexcusable.”

Hicks is organizing the vigil with the same women — Lisa Bowman, Nita Prasad and Lauren Soloff — who worked on Westport’s “Democracy on Display” march earlier this year.

They’ve gotten help from Defendemocracy’s Heidi Hammer, Sara Kempner and Cathy Rozynek.

It’s a community-wide effort, Hicks says, to address a national problem. For more information, click here.

 

Church’s “Black Lives Matter” Banner Gone — Again

The first time Westport’s Unitarian Church hung a “Black Lives Matter” banner on Lyons Plains Road, it lasted 10 months.

After it disappeared in August, church officials ordered a new one.

It was dedicated last Sunday — next to a “Hate Has No Home Here” sign.

This time, it took just 5 days before it too was gone.

It will be be back.

Rev. Dr. John Morehouse posted this message on Facebook:

“Every time the banner is vandalized it fortifies our resolve to replace it and underscores the very need for its existence.”

Church’s “Black Lives Matter” Banner Vandalized

It was unclear whether a recent toilet-paper incident near Old Mill Beach was related to a “Black Lives Matter” bumper sticker on the homeowner’s car.

But there’s no mistaking this vandalism.

Westport’s Unitarian Church is known for its focus on diversity, inclusion, openness and dedication to social justice. Its handsome building in the woods off Lyons Plains Road provides a safe haven for individuals, groups and causes of many kinds.

Last October — after a series of fatal police shootings of blacks — the church dedicated a “Black Lives Matter” banner. Speakers at the dedication included TEAM Westport chair Harold Bailey; State Senator Toni Boucher; 1st Selectman Jim Marpe, and Rev. Alison Patton of Saugatuck Congregational Church.

The Unitarian Church’s banner.

Unitarian Church representatives say the sign was “just a first step to engage with members of the congregation, local officials, interfaith clergy, and the community to affirm the need for dialogue and non-violent action towards the ending of racism in our society.”

When the banner went up, church officials fielded a number of phone calls. Some were supportive and thankful. Some were questioning. Some were opposed.

David Vita — director of social justice — says, “It made for lively, respectful conversations.”

In the early hours of Thursday morning — just days after neo-Nazis, the KKK and other hate groups marched in Charlottesville — the banner was ripped from its post.

The empty signpost.

Vita says, “It’s hard not to connect the destruction of the banner with a changed political climate, and an emboldened rise in racism.”

Senior minister Rev. Dr. John Morehouse adds, “We presume that those who took our sign feel that by removing it, they repudiate its message that black lives matter just as much as any other life.”

Marpe notes, “Given the current climate in this country and the state, the administration of our town and the Westport Police Department will not stand for this behavior. We will dedicate our resources to identifying the person or persons responsible for this vandalism. We urge our community to be respectful of the opinions of others and their right to express them, even if they may differ from their own. Hatred and bigotry are not welcome here.”

Police Chief Foti Koskinas says, “We support and respect the Unitarian Church, its members and their message of inclusiveness, equality and tolerance.  The police department is working with the church administration to prevent further incidents.”

All that remains of the “Black Lives Matter” banner. (Photo/David Vita)

The church is moving forward. This Sunday’s 10 a.m. service — planned before the incident — is “Heart of Racial Justice.”

Meanwhile, Morehouse promises to replace this sign. If it’s vandalized, it too will be replaced.

That will continue, he says, “until such a time as all lives — black, brown, gay or marginalized — matter as much as white lives do. We will not be intimidated by the forces of bigotry and hate.”

And, he notes, he will commit $100 to the NAACP whenever the banner is vandalized again.

(Anyone with information regarding the vandalism should call the Police Department detective bureau: 203-341-6080.)

Whipping Up A Community Thanksgiving Feast

After 46 years, you’d think the people organizing our annual Thanksgiving Day Community Feast would have their stuff together.

They do.

But in an attempt to make a fantastic event even better, they’ve added a few tweaks.

As usual, the meal — hosted by Saugatuck Congregational Church, in collaboration with Temple Israel, the United Methodist Church and Unitarian Church — takes place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day.

As always, anyone looking to enjoy (and share) a holiday meal is welcome. There is no charge.

Last year, over 325 folks feasted together. The menu includes turkey, stuffing, baked and sweet potatoes, Brussels sprouts, carrots and pies — all donated by local merchants and caterers. There’s live entertainment too.

A small part of the Thanksgiving Community Feast.

A small part of the Thanksgiving Community Feast.

Saugatuck Nursery School makes napkin rings. Coleytown Middle School bakes holiday breads. Temple Israel decorates place mats and banners. The Westport Garden Club provides fruit centerpieces for every table.

More than 150 volunteers — some from the religious institutions involved, others not — make it happen. They shop, prep, cook, serve and clean up.

Those volunteers are key. And that’s where one of the tweaks will make this feast the best ever.

Two volunteer shifts have been added for Wednesday, November 23: the day before Thanksgiving. That allows people with commitments on the holiday to help out too. The shifts start at 2:30 and 4 p.m., and run 90 minutes each.

Also new: head chef Raquel Rivers-Pablo. She epitomizes the volunteer spirit of the Community Feast.

Cehf Raquel Rivers-Pablo

Chef Raquel Rivers-Pablo

Classically trained at restaurants like Le Bernardin, she’s been recognized for her volunteer work with City Harvest, and attended the launch of Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move! campaign at the White House. Chef Raquel has taught cooking and nutrition classes, and been lead chef at the West Side Campaign Against Hunger.

Now, she provides cooking education as part of the Urban Eats Culinary Training Program, and at food pantries, community meal sites, senior centers and Green Village Initiative community gardens.

Chef Raquel’s goal is to spread her love for food with as many people as possible. With all of Westport’s help, she’ll do exactly that next week.

(There are still spots available to help with the Community Feast. Click here to volunteer.)

Moth Radio Hour: Westport-Style

A while ago, Jane Green told a story for the Moth Radio Hour. It was recorded in front of a live audience at New York’s Cooper Union.

Jane Green

Jane Green

In June, the Westporter — and internationally renowned author — told Moth stories again, on stage at an old, lovely theater in Boston. She was  joined by a Jamaican writer, New York City doctor, Puerto Rican actress and Boston fireman.

If you don’t know the Moth Radio Hour, you should. Broadcast on 400 radio stations — including WNYC in New York — it makes “This American Life” sound like amateur hour.

Story tellers have no script, and use no props. They stand in front of a microphone, under a spotlight, facing a room full of strangers.

The Moth Radio Hour is real, true stories, told by real, true people. Some are humorous. Others are heartbreaking. Some are both. All are transfixing and addictive.

moth-radio-hourAlert “06880” reader — and very-interesting-woman-herself — Katherine Bruan is a Moth fanatic. She also loves Jane Green.

So, Katherine thought, why doesn’t Westport — a town filled with talented, charismatic people, many with diverse backgrounds and all of whom have stories — have our own Moth hour?

It could be once or twice a year, Katherine suggested, at the Westport Country Playhouse or library. It would bring the community together. We’d all be entertained, moved and uplifted.

It’s a fantastic idea. And — to Katherine’s, my and probably your surprise — it’s already been done.

Starting last fall, Tom Croarkin organized several similar events at the Unitarian Church in Westport. He calls them “Story Slams,” but they’re really Moth Radio Hours without the radio.

Each participant gets 5 minutes. They can’t use props. And their story must fit a theme.

The Westport Unitarian Church welcomes everyone -- including story-tellers.

The Westport Unitarian Church welcomes everyone — including story-tellers.

The first one — last November — centered around “Lying Through My Teeth.” The second, in February, was about “Lost and Found” (stories were figurative, as well as literal).

May’s theme was “Trouble.” Fifteen folks got up and told woeful tales.

The next Unitarian Church Story Slam is this Friday (September 23, 7 p.m.).The theme is “Vacation.”

There’s a $10 admission fee (it’s a fundraiser for the church). BYOB.

To RSVP (not required) or more information, email tcroarkin1126@att.net.

So start thinking about your vacation stories. I’m sure Jane Green has at least one good one to share!