Tag Archives: Sam Gold

Sam’s Stickers Strike Gold

When it comes to technology, Sam Gold is your man.

For his bar mitzvah, he chose a visit to San Francisco — and Apple’s headquarters — over a party.

He amassed over 15,000 print and TV ads, keynote speeches, internal training videos and other material to create an amazing, unofficial but world-renowned Apple archive.

Sam Gold (right), with instructor Geno Heiter, helped develop Staples High School’s innovative “70 North” on a variety of platforms.

Sam — who graduated last month from Staples High School — is my go-to computer guy. He solves every problem quickly and efficiently, and has the grace to never make me feel that my most idiotic questions are, well, idiotic.

Sam — who co-created apps to help users control and monitor their devices — worked his way far up Apple’s food chain. After years of persistence, he finally wangled an invitation to their World Wide Developers Conference.

It was set for June, in San Jose. But the pandemic forced the prestigious event online.

One of the best aspects of the WWDC for developers is networking. Rather than business cards, they swap stickers. They cover their laptops, and are great conversation starters.

No live conference? No problem!

Sam and a few other independent app developers decided created a sticker pack to sell online. Proceeds would go to the World Health Organization’s COVID-19 Response Fund and Equal Justice Institute.

Sam found 134 developers who wanted their brand’s sticker to be included. He designed 15 individual sheets of stickers.Quickly, he had a website up and running. The ordering window opened a week before the virtual WWDC, and closed the day after its keynote.

Over 1,500 orders poured in, from around the world.

One page of Sam’s stickers.

Last week, 22,500 were delivered to Sam’s house. They covered his family’s dining room table.

Then the low-tech work began. He, his parents and brother collated, sorted and stuffed envelopes. They hauled all those boxes to the post office, which — based on recent reports of its possible demise — must have been very happy for the haul.

Sam Gold, at his dining room table.

Sam and his business partner provided a bit of fun for developers who missed out on the in-person experience of WWDC. And they raised $10,000 for their 2 causes.

Sure gives new meaning to the term “sticker shock.”

Sam Gold’s Archives: Apple Bites Back

Sam Gold is an Apple fanboy.

For his bar mitzvah, he chose a visit to San Francisco — and the company’s headquarters — over a party.

His YouTube channel covered Apple the way the British press covers Harry and Meghan.

But Sam’s greatest accomplishment may be The (Unofficial) Apple Archive. Painstakingly and lovingly, using tools like the Wayback Machine, he amassed over 15,000 print and TV ads, keynote speeches, internal training videos and other material — even macOS and iOS wallpapers. The earliest is from 1979.

Previously, the material was posted on his own YouTube channel, and a Google Drive folder. Earlier this month, he uploaded all the video — nearly a terabyte of data* — to Vimeo.

Last week, the $1 trillion company sent him hundreds of takedown notices. Apple had removed nearly every video. Just 200 or so remain.

Sam is a Staples High School senior.

Sam Gold, as a Staples High School sophomore.

The news rocketed around the internet. The Verge — Vox Media’s tech news network — noted:

The takedowns shouldn’t really surprise anyone, since 1) these videos do presumably all belong to Apple, not Gold, 2) companies generally have a duty to protect their intellectual property, and 3) because Gold and Apple have seemingly been playing a game of whack-a-mole for a while now.

First came shock. “Do you know what it’s like getting 700 email notifications on your wrist in like 2 minutes?” Sam asked The Verge, referring to his (of course) Apple Watch. “Your wrist sorta goes numb from the vibrations.”

Then Sam fought back.

“My videos may be down but my spirit is up,” the homepage of Sam’s Apple Archives reads. “Standby please.”

A screenshot of Sam’s home page.

Sam — who has not heard directly from Apple or its lawyers, despite emailing Apples’s VP of marketing communications — told The Verge that company employees, both past and present, have shown “overwhelming interest and support for what I’m doing.”

He understands that Apple “doesn’t dwell in the past.” But, he adds, “public company history preservation is invaluable for their devoted consumer base and researchers alike.”.

Sam would love to work with Apple, to create an official archive.

But for now, he’s figuring out how to get his massive archives back online.

Any copyright lawyers want to help? Email samhenrigold@gmail.com.

As a bonus, Sam will help you with any tech questions you have, for the rest of your life.

*Exactly how much is a terabyte? “A shitload,” Sam explains.

An early Apple ad, on Sam’s archive.

 

 

Now Streaming: 70 North

WWPT-FM was one of the first high school radio stations in the country.

Decades later, Staples again innovated — this time with an in-school TV show.

Now, our high school once again leads the pack.

Welcome to “70 North.”

With a soft launch last week, the site — named for the school’s physical address — became a clever, irreverent, YouTube-like destination for 1,900 students, scores of staff and faculty members, and anyone else in the world who wants to know what’s going on at that active, creative and very fertile campus.

It’s a work in progress. But what a work it is.

70 North marks the next step in the evolution of television. And whether that TV is based in a high school or broadcasts nationally doesn’t really matter, says media teacher Geno Heiter.

What counts is content. “70 North” has plenty of it. Sports, features, upcoming events, guidance and college news, humor, poetry, reviews, music department concerts, artwork — you name, it will find its way onto the site.

For over a decade, the school was served by “Good Morning Staples.” Devised by former instructors Jim Honeycutt and Mike Zito, and filmed, edited and hosted by students, the show aired 3 times a week, at 8:25 a.m. Every class watched — supposedly — an intriguing mélange of interviews, announcements, sports highlights and more.

It was fun, entertaining — and static.

The television landscape has changed a lot since “Good Morning Staples” marked a fresh way of providing information. Americans — particularly teenagers — no longer sit on a couch and watch a show at a predetermined time.

TV today is all about streaming. People watch on their terms, their schedule — and their devices.

70 North is television for the smartphone age.

A poster for one of the many episodes available from “70 North.”

Just as viewers no longer have to gather around a big screen, creators no longer lug around big (or even moderate-sized) cameras. Great video can be shot on phones everyone carries.

Thanks to TikTok, Snapchat and many other apps, students are used to telling visual stories. They have a different way of telling those stories too, than even people just a few years older.

“70 North” allows them to do just that. Yet it’s hard to describe, and still evolving.

Heiter says, “It’s a platform. It’s whatever they want it to be.”

Sam Gold — a crazily creative senior, and one of the driving forces behind 70 North — calls it “School updates that don’t suck.”

Max Dorsey, shooting a “70 North” show.

Heiter likens “70 North” to Netflix. “You choose what you want, from a lot of options. It’s not one video that’s forced on you.”

But it’s not the Wild West of the web. It’s still a schoolwide communication tool. It uses server space provided by the district. And it’s as educational as it is entertaining.

Geno Heiter (left) and Sam Gold, with “70 North” on the laptop.

Heiter says he’s still “teaching skills, teaching technical ability, teaching how to use sophisticated equipment, how to cover stories, how to engage and build an audience.”

But he’s doing it in a way that meets students — those who create 70 North, and those who watch it — exactly where they are.

Which, these days, is in front of a device. Not a TV screen. Accessible any time, anywhere, by anyone.

Once again, Staples High School is at the forefront.

Just as it will be in 2029, when a new, not-yet-invented form of communication supplants “70 North.”

(Click here for “70 North.” Then bookmark it!)

Sam Rocks CES

Every January, CES — originally called the Consumer Electronics Show — draws 4,000 exhibitors to Las Vegas. Over 180,000 of the biggest names in technology and electronics — the industry’s movers and shakers — roll out new products, pitch ideas, schmooze and party.

Virtually none of them are high school sophomores.

Then again, few 10th graders are Sam Gold.

Posting as Sam Henri, he’s a content creator and social influencer. Sam’s more than 11,000 YouTube subscribers love his unique take on all things techs.

He’s high enough on the food chain that Google sent a web router. Other companies regularly offer new products to review.

Sam Gold, at Google’s pop-up shop in SoHo.

Still, that hardly guaranteed him a spot in the very adult/professional world of CES.

But — with the help of his Staples video production teacher Justin Nadal — Sam snagged coveted press credentials.

At school, Sam has already earned a great reputation with his “Good Morning Staples” tech reports. He writes, edits and creates videos as easily as you or I flick a light switch. Here’s his preview of CES:

Last week, Sam headed west.

What goes on in Vegas usually stays there.

Except for CES. Here’s Sam’s first video, posted yesterday:

Today, Sam is back in Westport. He’s studying for midterms.

But it’s clear he’s going places.

And far beyond Nevada.

Sam Gold: Apple’s Archive Savior

When Sam Gold was 13, his parents gave him a bar mitzvah choice: a party, or a trip.

He went to San Francisco. But he wasn’t interested in the Golden Gate Bridge, or curvy Lombard Street. He wanted to visit the headquarters of Apple and Google.

Sam is now a Staples High School sophomore. He hasn’t lost his fascination with some of the most innovative companies on the planet. If anything, he’s teaching them some lessons.

Sam Gold recently, at Google’s pop-up shop in SoHo.

Sam has already made a name for himself on YouTube. Posting as Sam Henri, he’s a content creator and social influencer. Sam’s 5,800 subscribers love his unique take on all things techs.

He’s high enough on the food chain that Google sent a web router, and Philips shipped WiFi-enabled light bulbs, for him to review. Check out his channel — he’s going places.

Sam is also a very talented graphic designer.

Sam Gold had fun editing this photo. Yes, that’s him on the wall.

But it’s as an Apple fan that he may be most impressive.

From age 3, when he got his first iPod Nano (from his Nana), he has loved all things Apple.

So last April — when the man running the biggest Apple archive on the internet suddenly terminated his channel — Sam took notice.

And instantly flew into action.

He’d already spent years using tools like the Wayback machine to archive over 800 Apple-related videos. They included ads, keynote speeches, even weird internal training tapes.

The earliest video was from 1979 — decades before Sam was born.

In 2001, Steve Jobs introduced the iPod. Sam Gold has that video — and many others.

Within 24 hours he’d uploaded them all to his own, new unofficial Apple archive YouTube channel.

As you’ve figured out by now, Sam knows his way around the internet. Before posting his 80 gigabytes of videos, he checked YouTube’s Terms of Service. He was sure his archives were legit.

But a week later YouTube flagged Sam, for violating their TOS. They called his Apple channel “spam” — although he was not charging anyone, or making any money off it.

Repeated requests for clarification from YouTube went unheeded.

So Sam turned to the tech-savvy Reddit community. Suggestions poured in.

His archives were not gone, of course. He kept them on a disk. That was perfect for one Reddit user, who had a petabyte worth of storage on his server. (A petabyte is a million gigabytes. Or, in layman’s terms, “a shitload.”)

He offered it to Sam. The teenager quickly transferred his archives from a disk to the server. That’s where — right here — they are now, available free to the world.

Apple’s amazing video archives — all in one place, courtesy of Sam Gold.

But that’s not the end of Sam’s story.

A reporter for Vice heard what happened, and contacted Sam. That led to a front-page story on Motherboard, Vice’s tech platform.

Which, in turn, led to the possibility of Sam freelancing for that well-read, edgy and influential site.

Which leads to this “06880” request.

Later this month, Apple makes a big announcement. They’re expected to announce the next generation iPhone.

Sam has tried to get on the press list. So far, he’s been unsuccessful.

So: If any “06880” reader has Apple connections, please help Sam travel (once again) to California.

It’s the least Apple can do for the kid who saved their entire video archives.

BONUS FUN FACT 1: In addition to Google and Philips, Apple sent Sam some products. Unfortunately, it’s not an iPhone or other device. The largest information technology company in the world gave him a hat, pen and water bottle.

BONUS FUN FACT 2: This summer, Sam decided to see how many certifications he could get online. He is now an official Universal Life minister, ordained to perform weddings, funerals and (I am not making this up) exorcisms. Sam declined to get certified as a lactation consultation, however. He saved that $35 fee — perhaps for his upcoming trip to California.