Tag Archives: Kerry Long

Players Learn From A Real-Life Newsie

Most high school theater groups prepare for a show by listening to the cast album. They watch a video. The director adds whatever insights he or she can.

Staples Players is not most high school theater groups.

For one thing, this fall’s main stage production is “Newsies.” Players scored a coup last spring, when Disney asked directors David Roth and Kerry Long to pilot the production. They’ll provide executives with feedback. A year from now, other amateur companies across the nation can produce the show too.

For another thing, Players’ cast and crew learned about “Newsies” from an actual newsboy.

Actual, as in one who was on Broadway.

Adam Kaplan — the former Players star who graduated in 2008 — played a newsboy (and Morris Delancey) in the New York production. He also understudied for lead Jack Kelly.

Last week, Kaplan returned to the Staples auditorium. He shared stories about his time with “Newsies,” including how he got the role and how he trained for it.

Adam Kaplan (center) with Nick Rossi and Charlie Zuckerman. The Staples students are double cast as Jack Kelly –the role Kaplan understudied on Broadway. (Photo/Kerry Long)

He also offered advice on how the young actors can take care of themselves, while doing such a physical show.

The students seemed awed when Kaplan walked in. But they quickly responded to his enthusiasm and charisma.

They loved when he joined them in “Zip, Zap Zup” — a popular theater game he played, when he was at Staples.

And when he himself dreamed about making it to Broadway.

The cast and crew of Staples Players’ “Newsies”pose with Adam Kaplan. (Photo/Kerry Long)

(Click here to join Staples Players’ email list, for ticket information on upcoming shows.)

Staples Players’ Summer Musical “Working”: A Perfect Day Off For Audiences

When the school year ends, David Roth and Kerry Long don’t stop working.

After directing Staples Players’ 2 mainstage productions and a host of Black Box Theater shows, they turn their attention to the very popular summer musical.

This year marks the 10th anniversary of the directors’ summer show. For the hard-working, very creative Roth and Long — and the equally hard-working and very talented Staples Players cast and crew — the selection is appropriate:

“Working.”

On July 20, 21 and 22, more than 50 students — from recent alumni to rising freshmen — will stage the sprawling, toe-tapping adaptation of Studs Terkel’s 1972 book. Stephen Schwartz (“Wicked,” “Godspell,” “Pippin”), James Taylor and Lin-Manuel Miranda contributed the music.

Using real words of actual people, the production takes an intimate look at the struggles and joys of a variety of Americans: factory workers, millworkers, project managers, cleaning ladies, masons, stay-at-home moms. Using a style similar to “A Chorus Line,” “Working” weaves together the stories of nearly 40 laborers over the course of one workday.

Rising freshman Samantha Webster and Staples 2016 grad Samantha Chachra rehearse Lin Manuel-Miranda’s “A Very Good Day.” (Photo/Kerry Long)

It’s a fascinating show, and it resonates for many reasons.

For one, it’s timely. As America debates all aspects of work — lost mining jobs, jobs moved overseas, how to prepare for jobs that don’t yet exist, gender stereotypes and roles, you name it — Miranda’s latest revision is compellingly relevant. As much as we talk about work, we seldom explore the meaning we get from whatever we do.

For another, Roth has wanted to direct the show since he was 16. He was a junior at Staples, and applied to present it as a studio production. Al Pia chose a senior’s project instead.

More than 30 years later, Roth gets his chance to work on “Working.”

For a third, it’s a musical that engages the 55 actors and 20 tech members. Freed from the pressures of schoolwork, they’re spending this summer totally devoted to something they love.

Summer shows draw together a wider range of ages than school-year productions. During the month of rehearsals and set construction they form strong bonds — essential to an ensemble work like “Working.”

Younger ones learn what it means to be a Staples Player. Older ones mentor them.

Christian Melhuish graduated last year, and is studying musical theater at Temple University. June graduate Jacob Leaf is headed to Northwestern. Both have roles onstage, and help Roth and Long as acting coaches.

Rising junior Antonio Antonelli, with alum Christian Melhuish in Staples Players’ production of “Working.” (Photo/Kerry Long)

For hours every day since school ended, dozens of teenagers have been hard at work. Their job: producing a show that seems effortless, while offering insights, inspiration, and tons of entertainment.

They’ve done it all for free. After all, they’re Staples Players.

But if they were getting paid, everyone would deserve a huge raise.

(“Working” will be performed Thursday, July 20; Friday, July 21 and Saturday, July 22 at 7:30 p.m., with a 3 p.m. matinee on Saturday, July 22, in the Staples High School auditorium. Click here for tickets. Tickets may also be available at the door 30 minutes prior to each show.)

Stop The Presses! Staples Players’ Fall Production Is “Newsies”!

Just when you think Staples Players directors David Roth and Kerry Long have no more theatrical tricks up their sleeves — they stage a new one.

Every spring, they gather their cast and crew together to announce the following fall’s mainstage. It’s highly anticipated — but brief and straightforward.

A couple of weeks ago, Roth got an email from Disney Theatricals. The company handles all Disney productions — “Lion King,” “Mary Poppins” and “Newsies,” for example.

A few years ago, Roth and Long enjoyed the latter show on Broadway. As a recent production though, they never imagined it would be available.

Caley Beretta, as a Staples senior. (Photo/Kerry Long)

But Disney’s email — prompted by 2010 Staples grad Caley Beretta, who now works there as a creative development coordinator — posed an intriguing question: Would Players want to pilot a production of “Newsies”?

If so, the highly respected high school troupe would give Disney feedback on what worked well (and did not), and provide video and photos. Disney executives would see the show, and use Staples’ experience to revise their production. It will then be released to other amateur groups to stage, beginning in the fall of 2018.

The process for selecting a show usually takes much longer. But Roth and Long love “Newsies.”

‘”It’s a true story about the 1896 newsboys strike,” Roth notes. “It’s incredible how kids working together forced Joseph Pulitzer to not take advantage of them. It really is a show about kids. And it’s an ensemble show, which is great too.”

This being Staples Players, there’s a strong connection to the Broadway version. Adam Kaplan — Staples ’08 — played Morris Delancey and a newsboy (and understudied for lead Jack Kelly).

Adam Kaplan (left) and “Newsies” fans (called “fansies”).

Long had a great idea: Kaplan could announce the play to Players.

Last Friday morning, she contacted him. He quickly filmed a video, and sent it over.

That afternoon, Players gathered in the auditorium. Roth had said all day, “I am not announcing the show.”

Technically, he didn’t.

The video began. Kaplan insisted there was no specific reason he was chosen for the task. Meanwhile, he coyly showed his “Newsies” t-shirt, held up an album cover and walked over to a poster.

It was a clever performance — and the audience of actors quickly understood. They laughed and applauded. (Watch Players’ reactions in the upper left of the announcement video below.)

Soon — after this month’s “Peter and the Starcatcher” Black Box, and July’s production of “Working” — they’ll turn their attention to “Newsies.”

Roth and Long are already thinking ahead. They know they’ll integrate more girls into the show. “There were actually female newsboys back then,” Roth says.

And Kaplan will help in some way — with talks, workshops, whatever.

Those details will still be worked out. Like all shows, it’s a work in progress.

Stay tuned for more news.

(“Peter and the Starcatcher” will be performed May 25, 26, 27 and 28. Online tickets are sold out, but a limited number of standby seats may be available at the door, 20 minutes before curtain. Click here for show times.)

You’re In Luck: “Urinetown” Opens Soon

When David Roth and Kerry Long saw “Urinetown” on Broadway in 2001, they thought it was one of the funniest shows they’d seen. They loved the story, writing, music and choreography.

The Staples Players co-directors waited eagerly for the first chance to stage it in Westport. It came 11 years ago. Roth says it turned out to be one of the most favorite musicals that group of actors ever did. Audiences loved it too.

For the last several years, Roth has wanted to reprise “Urinetown.” Months ago, he and Long decided on it as this spring’s mainstage production.

At the time, the presidential election was far in the distance. “We had no intention of it being a political choice,” he says. “But with the current unrest in the country, the cast really understands the satire.”

The 2017 Staples Players’ “Urinetown” — which opens Friday, March 17 and runs that weekend and the next — has a very different look than the previous incarnation. There’s a completely new cast, of course, but also a new choreographer.

Jacob Leaf as Officer Lockstock, and Georgia Wright as Little Sally. (Photo/Kerry Long)

So far, the choice has lived up to the directors’ intentions. “Students are throwing themselves into creating big, bold characters,” Roth says.

“Bits we’ve watched time and again in rehearsal still make us laugh,” Long notes.

The show has “a lot of great character parts,” Roth says, providing many opportunities for actors to shine. Among them: Remy Laifer, a Players co-president (hero Bobby Strong). Previously, he’s played either socially awkward people or old men.

The musical — which won 3 Tony Awards — is set in a dystopian city. A 20-year drought has caused a terrible water shortage, making the use of private toilets unthinkable.

Public restrooms are regulated by a single mega-corporation. Anyone failing to pay is sent to a penal colony called Urinetown. A hero emerges from the poor. He’s had enough, and plans a revolution to lead all the peons (ho ho) to safety.

Charlie Zuckerman as Bobby, outside “Amenity #9.” (Photo/Kerry Long)

“‘Urinetown’ tells the story of political greed, and how corrupt governments affect the common citizen,” Laifer says. “It affirms that everyone should have a voice.”

Zoe Samuels — who plays Hope, Bobby’s love interest and daughter of the mega-corporation’s CEO — adds, “those who suffer continue to fight, because of ‘hope’ for a better future.”

Players shows often raise funds for good causes. “Urinetown” is no exception. Patrons will be given the opportunity to pay for “the privilege to pee” at intermission. Proceeds go to Water.org, an international non-profit that provides safe drinking water to millions of people.

Tickets are on sale now (see below). Act quickly. Don’t be pissed off at missing this chance for a very funny, cleverly staged show. Urine for a real treat.

PS: It’s rated “pee-gee.”

(“Urinetown” will be performed on Friday and Saturday, March 17, 18, 24 and 25, at 7:30 p.m., with a 3 p.m. matinee on Sunday, March 19. Click here for tickets. Any remaining tickets will be available at the Staples High School auditorium door 20 minutes before showtime.)

Justin Paul Wins An Oscar — And Hails School Arts Programs

Justin Paul and his songwriting partner, Benj Pasek, won Oscars tonight for “City of Stars,” the signature song from “La La Land.” The lyricists were honored for another song — “Audition (The Fools Who Dream)” — from the same film. So they had 40% of the category locked down.

The 2003 Staples High School graduate used part of his acceptance speech to give a shout-out to the importance of the arts for young people.

“I was educated in public schools, where arts and culture are valued,” Paul — a product of the Westport school system — said. At a time of pressure from STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) state requirements, as well as the possible elimination of the National Endowment of the Arts, Paul made sure to thank all the teachers who helped nurture him.

He did not mention them by name, but former Staples High School choral director Alice Lipson and current Staples Players directors David Roth and Kerry Long were enormous influences. So were Coleytown Middle School director Ben Frimmer, and Kevin Connors of Music Theatre of Connecticut.

Justin Paul at the Oscars.

Justin Paul at the Oscars.

Paul and Pasek’s Oscar is the latest in a string of awards for the young duo. Earlier this year, “City of Stars” earned a Golden Globe.

And that comes on the heels of the success of Broadway’s “Dear Evan Hansen,” for which they wrote the music and lyrics.

Congratulations Justin, from all your fans in Westport — this “town of stars.”

Justin Paul's Oscar acceptance speech.

Justin Paul’s Oscar acceptance speech.

Legendary Painting Restored; Prints On Sale Now

In the fall of 1946, Westport artist Stevan Dohanos invited 5 students from the 40-member Staples High School band — led by John Ohanian — to be models. Dohanos was creating a Saturday Evening Post cover, and needed musicians.

The quintet — Ed Capasse, Bob Nash, Evelyn Bennett, Steve Sefsik and Robert Barker — came to his studio. He paid them $30 each — over $400 today — to sit still for 30 minutes, as if playing their brass instruments. The cover ran on October 19, 1946.

Ed Capasse was in the upper left of StevanDohanos' painting. He went on to become a noted Westport lawyer. Here's his yearbook photo and writeup.

Ed Capasse was in the upper left of Stevan Dohanos’ painting. He went on to become a noted Westport lawyer. Here’s his yearbook photo and writeup.

In 2001, Staples Players director David Roth selected “The Music Man” as a mainstage production. His promotional poster was a takeoff on Dohanos’ iconic painting. Cast members Jonathan Adler, Trey Skinner, Samantha Marpe, Steven Fuertes and Hayden Moskowitz modeled.

Staples Players' 2001 poster.

Staples Players’ 2001 poster.

This year, “The Music Man” returns. So does the poster. This time Julien Zeman, Tucker Ewing, Maggie Foley, Nick Rossi and Colin McKechnie sat for a photo. (You can see Jacob Leaf — who plays Harold Hill — in the sousaphone reflection.)

...and the 2016 version.

…and the 2016 version.

Now – in honor of the upcoming performances of “The Music Man” — Dohanos’ painting is back in a position of honor.

In 1946, the artist donated the original to the Westport schools. For decades it hung in the Staples band room. Later it could be seen in the principal’s office, then outside the first selectman’s office in Town Hall.

Now a treasured masterpiece of the Westport Public Art Collections Committee, in 2014 the organization raised funds to have the painting conserved and returned to full brilliance.

Westport illustrator Stevan Dohanos' 1946 Saturday Evening Post cover.

Westport illustrator Stevan Dohanos’ 1946 Saturday Evening Post cover.

Yesterday, it was unveiled and hung in its new position of honor: the Staples auditorium lobby. On hand were Players co-directors Roth and Kerry Long; First Selectman Marpe (whose daughter posed for the 2001 poster), and principal James D’Amico.

“Music Man” audiences this weekend and next will enjoy the restored painting (along with the other posters). So will theatergoers for years to come.

“The Music Man” posters in the Staples lobby.

But now anyone can enjoy the painting in their own home. Recently, Art Collections Committee members found a trove of prints that Ann Sheffer made for a fundraiser in the late 1980s.

They’re on sale again, as a fundraiser for 3 worthy organizations: Friends of Westport Public Art Collections, Collections, Staples Music Parents Association and the Westport Historical Society.

Sales take place at “Music Man” performances this weekend and next, as well as online. Just click here to own a piece of Westport (and musical) history.

(“The Music Man” performances are Friday and Saturday, November 11, 12, 18 and 19 at 7:30 p.m., with 3 p.m. matinees on Sunday, November 13 and Saturday, November 19. Click here for tickets. They’re also available 30 minutes prior to the performance in the Staples High School lobby, as available.)

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Click here for “06880+”: The easy way to publicize upcoming events, sell items, find or advertise your service, ask questions, etc. It’s the “06880” community bulletin board!

“Music Man” Tootles Into Town

Some people want Hillary. Others want Trump.

Everyone wants “The Music Man.”

This fall — with our nation so divided — Staples Players co-directors David Roth and Kerry Long are staging what Roth calls “the classic American musical.”

The show — which debuted on Broadway in 1957 — “hearkens back to a simpler time. At its heart, this is really about community.”

River City is a town filled with discord, riven by dysfunctional relationships. The school board, for example, bickers about everything — even whose watch is right.

Through music, the town becomes whole. “Professor” Harold Hill turns the school board into a barbershop quartet. When they’re together, they produce beautiful harmonies.

The RIver City quartet: ax Herman (Staples, ’19), Christopher Hoile (Staples, ’18), Tobey Patton (Staples, ’20) and Oliver Smith (Staples, ’17).

The RIver City quartet: Max Herman, Christopher Hoile, Tobey Patton and Oliver Smith. (Photo/Kerry Long)

Music changes everyone in town — including Harold himself.

“Like many people in theater, Kerry and I believe this is the perfect musical,” Roth says. “It’s a fantastic blend of story, comedy, music, dance, drama and romance. It doesn’t get any better than that.”

This is not Players’ first production of “The Music Man.” In 2001 — less than 2 months after 9/11 — Roth staged it as one of his early Staples shows.

Then, as now, fear and dread filled the country. Fifteen years ago, “The Music Man” lifted Westport’s spirits. Roth calls the musical “a love letter to Americana,” and hopes it does the same now.

Staples PlayersWhen the show opens next Friday (November 11) — and runs through the following weekend — audiences will see what may be Roth and Long’s largest and most stunning set ever. Former Player Reid Thompson — who earned an MFA in set design from the Yale School of Drama — has created a stage that conveys an enormous sense of community.

“The town is present in every scene,” Roth says. “It’s a sprawling Iowa landscape.”

There are other differences between this production, and the post-9/11 one. New choreographers Christopher Myers and Rachel MacIsaac have put their own stamp on the dance routines.

In keeping with the sweeping show, the cast is huge. Jacob Leaf — who thrilled audiences as Tevye in “Fiddler on the Roof” — is Harold Hill. Zoe Mezoff  enjoys her 1st big lead, as Marian the Librarian. They’re joined by 62 other Stapleites, and 8 more from elementary and middle school.

Jacob Leaf as Harold Hill, and Zoe Mezoff as Marian the Librarian. (Photo/Kerry Long)

Jacob Leaf as Harold Hill, and Zoe Mezoff as Marian the Librarian. (Photo/Kerry Long)

“The Music Man” is a celebration of community. It’s set in River City. But all of us here will feel the communal spirit too.

Just look around the lobby. There — in a place of honor — hangs Westport artist Stevan Dohanos’ original Saturday Evening Post cover.

Published in 1946, it shows 5 band members all looking away, in mid-toot. The models were all Staples students.

Dohanos’ work had nothing to do with “The Music Man.” But Roth and Long have used it as the poster for the show.

...and the 2016 version.

That’s the kind of thing that brings a town together, and fills it with pride.

Harold Hill: Eat your heart out!

(“The Music Man” performances are Friday and Saturday, November 11, 12, 18 and 19 at 7:30 p.m., with 3 p.m. matinees on Sunday, November 13 and Saturday, November 19. Click here for tickets. They’re also available at a “pop- up box office” at the Westport YMCA on Saturday, November 5 (9-11 a.m.), or 30 minutes prior to the performance in the Staples High School lobby, as available.)

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Click here for “06880+”: The easy way to publicize upcoming events, sell items, find or advertise your service, ask questions, etc. It’s the “06880” community bulletin board!

Stacy Bass Shoots 365 Flowers

Years ago, alert “06880” reader/nature-and-lifestyle photographer Stacy Bass had an idea: For the next year, she’d take and share an image of whatever she happened to be doing at noon that day.

It was, she admits, “crazy and stupid.” The project lasted exactly 2 days.

Now, Stacy’s back. Her new idea is much more workable — and beautiful.

She was inspired by Kerry Long. Stacy’s friend and fellow photographer worked on her own 365-day project, shooting images of her young daughter Lucy. Kerry’s photos were “outstanding, stunning and wonderfully composed,” Stacy says.

Lucy Roth (Photo/Kerry Long)

Lucy Roth (Photo/Kerry Long)

Her own children — much older than Lucy — “would not be nearly as cooperative,” Stacy notes. Nor are portraits her specialty.

Stacy wondered what subject matter would keep her interested and motivated every single day, for a year.

Suddenly she knew.

Flowers.

Though she photographs flowers regularly,  as part of garden shoots for magazines and private clients — check out her great Gardens at First Light book — Stacy knew she’d have to stay focused (ho ho) for a long time to find, take and share an image each day.

Stacy Bass. (Photo/Julie Bidwell for Wall Street Journal)

Stacy Bass. (Photo/Julie Bidwell for Wall Street Journal)

But she wanted to try.

Vacationing on Nantucket with her family last summer, she began.

Stacy Bass's 1st flower.

Stacy Bass’s 1st flower.

Nantucket bloomed with flowers of all kinds. When Stacy returned to Westport, she found many more.

The daily challenge proved invigorating. The positive reactions her photos drew on social media kept her going. Friends and strangers thanked her for providing a daily dose of “beauty and positivity.” (Hydrangeas are the crowd favorites.)

Some days were easier than others. About 2 months in, Stacy hit a figurative wall. She wondered if anyone would notice if she stopped.

But the feeling passed. Now that she’s finished, Stacy is proud of her consistency. She’s also thrilled to have tangible proof of 365 flowers, with a beginning, middle and end.

(Photo/Stacy Bass)

(Photo/Stacy Bass)

She’s not quite sure what to do with all those images, though. Fans have inquired about buying a print of their favorite “day,” or of a special date as a birthday or anniversary gift.

Perhaps figuring out how to do that is Stacy’s next project.

(For more information on Stacy’s flower photos, email swbass@optonline.net.)

A collage of Stacy Bass' flower photos.

A collage of Stacy Bass’ flower photos…

...and a collage of all 365 images.

…and a collage of all 365 images.

“Laramie Project: 10 Years Later”: The Back Story

At a time when Americans express more hatred against “others” — and more loudly — than in a long, long time, Staples Players addresses the issue of differences head-on.

This weekend, the stellar high school troupe produces “The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later.” The follow-up to last year’s “Laramie Project,” explores how that town has changed — politically, socially, religiously and educationally.

Players directors David Roth and Kerry Long have done “Laramie Project” 3 times. This is their 1st time directing the “10 Years Later” companion piece.

Roth says they are attracted to the shows — about the murder of gay college student Matthew Shepard, and its cascading effects on a small Wyoming town — because “the messages are huge.”

Charlie Zuckerman and Nick Ribolla. Each actor in the ensemble plays several roles. (Photo/Kerry Long)

Charlie Zuckerman and Nick Ribolla. Each actor in the ensemble plays several roles. (Photo/Kerry Long)

“The first play examined Laramie’s unraveling, and dealt with how and why people hate,” says Roth. “The second one deals with change and complacency. How do we effect change when we forget important issues that are not in the forefront? How do those issues slip away when not dealt with directly?”

Roth and Long are also intrigued by the writing. All text comes from direct interviews. There’s a thrilling documentary feel — for performers, directors and audiences.

The duo are excited too by the “cycle” of the shows. Staples is one of very few high schools to produce both dramas.

As they’ve done so many times before, Players is tackling a provocative, challenging subject.

Why?

“Because we have the means and opportunity to do so,” Roth says simply.

Keenan Pucci, and the "Laramie Project: 10 Years Later" company. (Photo/Kerry Long)

Keanan Pucci, and the “Laramie Project: 10 Years Later” company. (Photo/Kerry Long)

“Theater has the power to evoke thought, and bring about change. We are privileged to live in a town that allows us to produce thought-provoking work like ‘The Laramie Project.’ Our audiences are intelligent, well-read and well-traveled. They look to the next generation to challenge them, and make them think.”

Roth notes Players’ long history of producing shows that other high schools shy away from. In the 1960s and ’70s, dramas like “War and Pieces” (an original piece) and “Black Elk Speaks” dared Westporters to think deeply about controversial subjects.

In the early 1990s, students made national news by fighting to stage “Falsettos.” The musical — to be revived on Broadway this year — concerned love, homosexuality, Judaism and the then-recent AIDS crisis.

“Everyone involved still thinks of that show as a defining moment in their lives,” Roth explains. “Unfortunately, we rarely say that about shows that are light and fluffy. Yes, we remember them as fun, but they won’t stay with us too long.”

Brooke Wrubel, Jacob Leaf, Charlie Zuckerman and Jackie Rhoads, in "The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later." (Photo/Kerry Long)

Brooke Wrubel, Jacob Leaf, Charlie Zuckerman and Jackie Rhoads, in “The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later.” (Photo/Kerry Long)

Noting that theater has the power to change thoughts, lives and points of view, Roth says that the shows his young actors love most are “challenging, dramatic pieces that are emotionally taxing to perform”: “Hamilton,” “Rent,” “Spring Awakening.” All were risks, for writers and actors. None have happy endings. But they inspire audiences to examine their own lives, and the world around them.

The Players director calls Matthew Shepard’s murder “perhaps the most famous hate crime we’ve seen.” As Americans loudly debate how to treat those who are in any way “different” from others, “The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later” reminds us strongly that actions have consequences.

(“The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later” will be performed in Staples’ Black Box Theatre this Thursday, Friday and Saturday, May 19, 20 and 21 [7:30 p.m.], and Sunday, May 22 [3 p.m.]. For more information, click here. For tickets, click here.)

“Drowsy Chaperone”: Wake Up! Just 2 Performances Left!

It’s one thing for Staples Players to sell tickets to shows like “A Chorus Line,” “West Side Story” and “Guys and Dolls.”

Everyone knows the high school troupe will knock those familiar shows out of the park.

It’s a lot tougher to try to sell a musical few people have heard of — and with a sleep-inducing title.

Trust me: “The Drowsy Chaperone” will do more than keep you awake.

It’s laugh-out-loud hilarious. It’s superbly entertaining.

And it’s as Broadway-quality as every other Players production you’ve ever loved.

Drowsy Chaperone - Christian Melhuish, Aaron Samuels, Charlie Zuckerman - Kerry Long

Aaron Samuels (center) breaks theater’s “4th wall.” Playing “Man in Chair,” he also interacts with actors Christian Melhuish and Charlie Zuckerman. (Photo/Kerry Long)

The premise is a bit odd — a “Man in Chair” imagines an entire 1920s musical in his apartment — but trust me: It works.

Without knowing anything about 1920s musicals, you’ll get both the spoof of the genre — and the homage. The cast and crew clearly have fun. They straddle past and present — and their joy is infectious.

“The Drowsy Chaperone” features superb performances from — among others — Aaron Samuels (Man in Chair), and Jacob Leaf (Tevye in “Fiddler on the Roof,” this time nailing a Latin lover in a performance that would make Rudolph Valentino swoon).

There’s tap dancing, show-stopping songs, and Players’ signature professional sets, costumes and pit orchestra.

Trix the Aviatrix descends onstage, in a memorable number. (Photo/Kerry Long)

Trix the Aviatrix descends onstage, in a memorable number. (Photo/Kerry Long)

Directors David Roth and Kerry Long have been bombarded with emails from fans who — like me — surprised themselves at how much they loved a play they knew nothing about.

Roth and Long knew when they chose “Drowsy Chaperone” that it would be a tough sell. They took the challenge anyway.

They’re happy to see that — thanks to word of mouth — tickets are going fast for Friday and Saturday’s final performances.

Consider this your wakeup call.

(“The Drowsy Chaperone” will be performed this Friday and Saturday — March 18 and 19 — at 7:30 p.m., at Staples High School. Click here for tickets.)