Tag Archives: Jo Ann Davidson

0*6*Art*Art*0 — Week 15 Gallery

As Westport reopens, the number of submissions to our Saturday art gallery slows.

Still, there’s plenty of good work to show. As always, our artists’ many moods are reflected in many mediums.

Keep ’em coming. Professional, amateur, old, young — we want it all. Student submissions are particularly welcome!

The only rule: Your art must be inspired by, reflective of, or otherwise related to the times we’re going through. Email dwoog@optonline.net.

Handmade greeting card (Amy Schneider)

“Hand’s On: An Artist’s Touch (Photographer Larry Untermeyer took this photo of Westport artist Howard Munce at Elizabeth Gaynor’s sketch class in 2010)

“Comforting” (Lawrence Weisman)

“Corona Meltdown” (Nina Bentley)

“Taken While Watching TV For the Millionth Time” (Ellen Wentworth)

“Garden Gate” (Jo Ann Davidson)

Untitled (Karen Weingarten)

Unsung Hero #4

Most of us don’t know our trash collectors.

They arrive before we’re awake, or when we’re not home. If we do see them, we seldom interact.

But Bill Malone is special. According to Jo Ann Davidson — one of his 82 customers at Harvest Commons — he takes care of everyone, in all kinds of weather.

“He is always cheerful and helpful,” she says. “He lets us know if the holidays change the schedule. A real pro.”

Also on the Harvest Commons route is Bill’s now retired 1st grade teacher, Jane Fraser. She is proud of all her former students — especially her recycler, Bill Malone.

In fact, we all are!

Bill Malone

They Grow Up So Fast These Days!

For the past few years, Westporters have marveled at the ospreys that live between Fresh Market and Terrain.

The proud parents now have 2 youngsters, almost ready to leave their high home.

Earlier today, alert reader — and osprey lover — Jo Ann Davidson took a photo of the entire fine-looking family:

Ospreys - JoAnn Davidson

A Friend Returns

Every year like clockwork, swallows return to Capistrano.

Just as regularly, an osprey comes back to Westport.

Specifically, to its tall perch next to Fresh Market.

Yesterday, alert “06880” readers — and avid osprey fans — Wendy Crowther and Jo Ann Davidson both spotted our feathered friend, for the first time since last fall.

(Photo/Jo Ann Davidson)

(Photo/Jo Ann Davidson)

Only one was seen. Perhaps its mate was out fishing.

Or just enjoying a fine spring day, back in the town that always welcomes it home.

(Photo/Wendy Crowther)

(Photo/Wendy Crowther)

One More Reason To Love Trader Joe’s: The Sequel

Last week, we gave a shout-out to Trader Joe’s for the very selfish reason that a study shows the store’s presence in a town increases property values.

Today we salute the fun, funky and reasonably priced market for doing good for folks who may not have homes.

Alert “06880” reader Jo Ann Davidson — okay, very alert — noticed something the other day in the little hall near the bathrooms. (You didn’t know Trader Joe’s had bathrooms? They do — and they’re spacious, clean and nicely decorated. But I never spotted what Jo Ann saw.)

A sign nearby notes — proudly, but without bragging — that Trader Joe’s recycles about-to-expire (yet still quite edible) food.

Trader Joe's - 1

As the photo above explains, every store in the chain partners with “reliable and trustworthy” non-profits to pick up nearly expired food. (Flowers too!) Last week alone, Trader Joe’s donated nearly $12,000 worth of food.

But wait! There’s more!

They also collect winter items like coats, hats and gloves in a nearby box.

Trader Joe's - 2

What great ideas! Thanks, Trader Joe’s (and Jo Ann).

Just imagine how much they’d collect though, if they moved the collection box away from the who-knew-they-were-there bathrooms?

Like, say, over by the spot where they hand out (fantastic) free samples every day.

The Ospreys Are Back!

In the surest sign yet that our long, nightmarish winter is giving way to spring, Westport’s favorite ospreys have returned.

Last year, they nested on a dangerous high pole near Fresh Market. After they caused a power outage in July, CL&P (now Eversource) rerouted an electrical feed, to save the magnificent birds from harm.

In October — after the birds flew south for the winter* — the utility company relocated the nest to a higher utility pole, 150 feet away. This one had fewer wires. The hope was that the ospreys would return to the less dangerous nest this spring.

They did. Today, Jo Ann Davidson observed them, home again for the summer.

Welcome back!

Ospreys 2 - Jo Ann Davidson

The ospreys' new home. (Photos/Jo Ann Davidson)

The ospreys’ new home. (Photos/Jo Ann Davidson)

*Something all of us should have done.