Remembering Mimi Levitt

Annemarie “Mimi” Gratzinger Levitt — patron of the arts and historic preservation, longtime Westporter, and the namesake (with her husband) of the pavilion and organization that has provided free summer entertainment here for over 40 years — died of natural causes earlier today, in New York. She was 97.

Mimi Levitt

The Levitt Foundation sends this obituary:

Known for her intelligence, grace and hands-on approach to philanthropy and activism, Mimi believed in the arts as a source for positive social change and left a lasting legacy of generosity and service to the causes she supported.

Born in Vienna, Austria, Mimi’s childhood was filled with opera and other musical experiences. She emigrated to the United States with her mother at the outbreak of World War II, and soon after attended Pomona College in California. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a degree in French iterature.

Fluent in 5 languages, she was a translator at the Nuremberg trials. I

n 1947, she became senior assistant to Alfred Barr, Jr., the first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. She met rags-to-riches clothier and The Custom Shop founder Mortimer Levitt (1907-2005) at a Manhattan art gallery opening, where they had a spirited debate over a painting (Mimi favored abstraction; Mortimer preferred realism).

Following a brief courtship, they married on June 18, 1948, and together became philanthropists supporting youth music programs, performing arts organizations and educational institutions. Mimi and Mortimer were known for nurturing the careers of aspiring young musicians by hosting salons at their Manhattan brownstone.

An imaginative and meticulous hostess, Mimi threw memorable charity events and family celebrations. She often opened her home to artists and musicians.

In 1963, Mimi and her husband established the Mortimer Levitt Foundation (renamed the Mortimer & Mimi Levitt Foundation in 2012 in honor of her contributions). The main focus is to empower communities nationwide to transform underused public spaces into welcoming destinations through the power of free, live music. It now supports free outdoor concerts in 26 towns and cities.

The first Levitt Pavilion for the Performing Arts opened in Westport in 1974, the result of a community-driven effort to create an outdoor music venue as a community gathering place in the heart of town. As summer residents of Westport, the Levitts gave seminal support to the project and became the campaign’s largest private contributors.

Mimi served on the Levitt Pavilion board for decades, helping the nonprofit flourish and become a community treasure. Following her husband’s passing in 2005, Mimi became president of the Levitt Foundation and supported the growth of the Levitt program nationwide. In 2011, she was honored at the Westport Arts Awards as a “Champion of the Arts.”

Well into her 90s, she attended many Levitt Pavilion events.

The Levitt Pavilion is a Westport treasure. (Drone photo/Dave Curtis, HDFA Photography.com)

An active and loyal benefactor of the Bard Music Festival, Mimi served on the board of directors for 15 years (1998-2013), and for many years underwrote the Festival’s annual opening night dinner. An avid lover of opera, she supported opera workshops in the Conservatory’s Vocal Arts Program directed by Dawn Upshaw and helped commission one act operas. She also funded scholarships for Conservatory students and started the first endowment for the Bard

Music Festival in 2005.

Mimi was also passionately committed to historic preservation. In the 1970s she spearheaded the Neighborhood Association to Preserve Fifth Avenue Houses that successfully championed the creation of the Metropolitan Museum Historic District in New York City, designated in 1977. Her involvement grew from concern about protecting the distinctive character of her Upper East Side neighborhood, which in the 1970s was undergoing significant change.

She was one of the earliest supporters of the New York Landmarks Conservancy, and served on its board from 1978-2014. Mimi was honored by the Conservancy in 2011 for her 30 years of service.

Mimi Levitt

In 1995, Mimi and her husband donated 564 acres of wildlife habitat near Half Moon Bay to the Peninsula Open Space Trust in Marin County, California. The second largest gift in the county’s history, it provides an invaluable boost to ecological conservation efforts.

Together with Mortimer, Mimi also supported the Metropolitan Opera, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Mercy College, Museum of Television and Radio, New York City Opera, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Central Park Conservancy, The Joyce Theater, New Victory Theater, Lincoln Center’s Film Society, Hunter College, Music Center of Los Angeles, School of American Ballet, American Red Cross, and Young Concert Artists. She was a member of the Mayor’s Commission on Drug Addiction under Mayor Koch, a former trustee of the Town School in Manhattan and the Branch Libraries of the New York Public Library, and a children’s literacy volunteer in Harlem.

A beloved mother, aunt, step-grandmother and step-great-grandmother, Mimi cherished her family and their time together. She is survived by her daughter, Elizabeth “Liz” Levitt Hirsch of Los Angeles,who now serves as board president of the Mortimer & Mimi Levitt Foundation, and her son, Peter Levitt of New York, who also serves on the Levitt Foundation board.

A private funeral will be followed by a public memorial service, to take place at a later date. For details regarding the public memorial, please email memorial@levitt.org. In lieu of flowers, donations in honor of Mimi may be made to the Mortimer & Mimi Levitt Foundation.

Levitt Pavilion, before the crowds (Photo/Katherine Bruan)

17 responses to “Remembering Mimi Levitt

  1. Julie Fatherley

    We have been blessed as a community and the artistic world beyond our borders of Fairfield County to have people of taste, spirit, and financial means to keep the arts alive on many venues in our USA. Without the
    arts we have no soul….Thank you to Mimi and Mortimer for their
    investment in our community and beyond.

  2. Dan if you can send sympathy notes to her family, add one from Martin and me, we loved her can all she stood for, a great person—, Martin had the unique opportunity to dance with her at an event, she was a wonderful dancer….

  3. Mimi was a remarkable woman. Dan has documented her contributions to the arts very well, but in addition, she was a delightful, charming lady and will be greatly missed.

    • I wanted to add that my wife just happened to be sitting next to Mimi on the train to the city some years back and told me how down to earth Mimi was as they had a very pleasant chat.

  4. Wonderful essay Dan. You should be proud of yourself.

  5. RIP

  6. My wife and I had the pleasure of being dinner guests at the Levit’s home a number of times in WESTPORT years ago and will always remember the style and grace of Mimi’s hostessing as well as wonderful conversations she initiated. I also fondly recall Julia bring accompianied singing then by Mortimer playing piano. Both Mimi and Mortimer were philanthropic gems in our community of Westport as well as many other locations.💥
    God rest your soul Mimi🙏🏼

  7. Bonnie Scott Connolly

    When I was a teenager back in the 60s I played golf with the ladies in the Longshore Women’s Golf Association. Mimi was a member and was always very kind to me.

  8. IN 1960 MIMI BECAME A FOUNDER OD THE LONGSHORE WOMENS GOLF ASSOCIATION TOGETHER WITH BERYL BUCK AND ABOUT 30 OTHER LADIES WHO ORGANIZED LWGA. SOME OF THE OTHER LADIES WERE ALICE NICOLLS, URSULA HERMENZE, MARY MOGREN, MARY COONEY, ALYSE STEARNS, RHEA SCHINDLER, PAT DIXON, TISSIE AND ME. IN ALL WE HAD 30/32 MEMBERS. TODAY WE HAVE OVER 120. THANK YOU MIMI. YOU WERE AN INSPIRATION. YOU WERE FUN AND RESPECTED AND
    LOVED. THANK YOU DEAR FRIEND. CARYL

    • Bonnie Scott Connolly

      It makes me so happy to hear these names. These ladies were fantastic. I remember them so well. Although she was probably not a founding member Barbara Young was also a fantastic golfer in the 60s and I still keep in touch with her via Christmas cards.

  9. THERE WERE SO MANY OTHER GOLFERS WHO JOINED IN THE
    SIXTIES . . . .DOT ROE, ANGELA AULENTI, CONNIE MANN, JUDY MULLER, JOAN MOEN, GINNY PARKER AND SKIPPY YATES TO NAME A FEW. RE BARBARA YOUNG, I PLAYED WITH HER ON HER FIRST LWGA TUESDAY. A GREAT LADY . . .SAY HELLO FOR ME.

  10. Bonnie Scott Connolly

    More names that make me happy to hear. I remember playing with Ginny Parker who was of course my field hockey coach. It was fun once I relaxed and didn’t feel too intimidated. I will pass greetings on to Barbara Young. (She isn’t the greatest correspondent). I remember Betty Enright. I think I even babysat for some of Mary Mogren’s 7 kids. It was a fun time for me and I loved the Longshore Golf Course.

    • MARY AND MO LIVED “ON” THR GOLF COURSE. DO YOU REMEMBER THEIR YOUNGEST SELLING GOLF BALLS NEAR I THINK THE THIRD FAIRWAY WHICH HE HAD TAKEN OUT OF HIS FATHER;S GOLF BAG? HE WAS AN IMP

  11. Bonnie Scott Connolly

    Ha! No I don’t remember that. The youngest were twin girls but I can picture one of the boys doing that. They were a great family.

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