Tag Archives: Old School Revue

Roundup: Slice Canceled; Live Music Returns; More

 


The latest victim of the coronavirus: Slice of Saugatuck.

The Westport Weston Chamber of Commerce has canceled the annual event, planned for September 12. The food tasting and retail experience draws thousands of people to Saugatuck each fall. There’s music and kids’ activities too.

The announcement is a disappointment to festival-goers, restaurants and shops — and Homes with Hope, which benefits each year from the proceeds.


Hungry for live music? Hungry period?

Head to the Milestone in Georgetown this Saturday (July 25, 7:30 p.m.). There’s an “old school music variety show,” featuring Aztec Two-Step and the Old School Revue with the Saugatuck Horns, plus surprise guest artists.

The large patio offers plenty of space for social distancing. But — as it always does — great music draws everyone together.

There’s not even a cover charge!


Westport was well represented in this year’s Connecticut Entrepreneur Awards.

Sarah Deren of Experience Camps took home first place in the “Entrepreneur of the Year: Scaling Company” category, while Mark Mathias won in the “Community Favorite — Entrepreneur — Social Good” division for his work with Remarkable STEAM.

Mathias also earned honorable mention in the “Judged — Entrepreneur — Social Good” category.

Remarkable STEAM received honorable mention in the “Community Favorites – Event” category, for producing Maker Faire Westport.


Traffic has picked up lately — though it’s still lighter than pre-COVID levels.

Nevertheless, this sight on Morningside Drive South is one you don’t see too often here. The riders are Greens Farms residents.

(Photo/David Squires)

A group of friends gathered at the Longshore golf course 10th tee last week, to unveil a bench and plaque honoring Greg Tapfar. He died in December, of complications from ALS.

And finally … the Summer Olympics were set to begin in Tokyo this Friday. The pandemic has pushed the quadrennial event back to 2021. So it will be another year before we hear:

By The Time We Get To Westonstock

“By the time we got to Woodstock we were half a million strong …” Joni Mitchell sang.

Not quite. But a ton of people were at Yasgur’s farm, 49 years ago this month.

There won’t be quite as many at Weston’s Coley Homestead (104 Weston Road) on Saturday, September 15 (2 to 8 p.m.). They won’t get naked, sleep in the mud, and hear Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin and Country Joe rock America.

Hey, this is 2018, not 1969. But it will still be very, very cool.

The festival is the finale of the Weston Historical Society’s summer-long retrospective of ’60s music. Exhibits, concerts and forums have explored the impact of rock, psychedelia, folk, Motown, soul and more on our country — and our little slice of Fairfield County.

Like Woodstock though, Westonstock is about more than just music. There’s a ’60s car show, and kids’ activities too. (Those kids are of course the grandchildren of people who were stardust, golden children of God, back in the day.)

But music is key. Westonstock features Old School Revue — the popular local band fronted by 1966 Staples High School graduate Roger Kaufman. The Saugatuck Horns — a 6-piece R&B band — will be decked out in vintage ’60s attire.

Other performers include local favorites (and talented neighbors) Chance Browne, Rob Carlson, Crispin Cioe, Chris Coogan, Tim DeHuff, Charlie Karp, Jeff Southworth and David Weber.

All have long and storied musical pedigrees. They’ve played with the Rolling Stones, Buddy Miles, Jimi Hendrix (though not at Woodstock) and many more.

Roger Kaufman (center, with hat) and his Old School Revue.

The cars, meanwhile, will take you back to the days of listening to great music while cruising (or “watching the submarine races”). Many are on loan from Dragone Classic Motors.

There are also ’60s music trivia contests, and ’60s dance demonstrations.

Jr’s Hot Doggin’ Food Truck and Olive & Julep Craft Cocktails head the list of food and beverage suppliers.

Whether you recall the ’60s, can’t remember them (“if you do, you weren’t there,” Grace Slick or Timothy Leary or Robin Williams supposedly said), or were not yet born, Westonstock is for you.

All you need is a blanket, a lawn chair and some patchouli.

(Click here for tickets and more information. They’re also available the day of the event. Proceeds help renovation projects at Coley Barn and Coley Farmhouse.) 

Roger Kaufman: Memphis (Rhythm ‘n’) Blues Again

Roger Kaufman is old school.

While his peers listened to the Doors and Janis Joplin, the 1966 Staples High School graduate sang doo wop.

His band — Four on the Floor — moved on to jazz, R&B and folk tunes.

Roger Kaufman

Roger Kaufman

Music changed, but Kaufman didn’t. He formed a group called the Old School Revue. Decades later, they still play all around the area. (Old School Music is also the name of Kaufman’s music event production company.)

His old-school roots extend back to ragtime. Back in the day, Mel Kaufman — Roger’s grandfather — was one of America’s premier ragtime songwriters.

Through that ragtime connection, Roger met John Hasse. He’s curator of American music, at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

Hasse needed help filling a hole in the renowned museum’s collection. He asked Kaufman to find people who’d been involved in the 1960s Memphis rhythm ‘n’ blues scene.

Green OnionsThe Stax label — named for its founders, record store owners Jim STeward and Estelle AXton — was a creative, fertile and constantly evolving home for talented musicians. Black and white, they played together — at a time when the country was convulsed by civil rights conflicts, and integrated music sessions were almost unheard of.

Kaufman — who calls Hasse a “brilliant and wonderful ethnomusicologist” — was happy to help.

For the past 2 years, Kaufman traveled in search of Memphis musicians. He found one who now lives in Nashville. His name: Steve Cropper.

No history of Memphis R&B is complete without Steve Cropper. As guitarist for Booker T. & the MGs — Stax’s house band — he backed artists like Otis Redding, Sam & Dave and Carla Thomas. He also produced many of their records.

Later, he earned fame as a Blues Brothers founder. Rolling Stone ranked him 39th on its list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time.

Steve Cropper and Roger Kaufman

Steve Cropper and Roger Kaufman.

The Smithsonian needs artifacts — letters, photos, Grammy Awards — from the Stax days. Cropper has them.

Now — with Kaufman’s help — he’s donating them to the museum.

At his Nashville home, Cropper showed 3 guitars to Kaufman. One was used on Otis Redding’s “Dock of the Bay” sessions. The others backed Rod Stewart and Tower of Power.

The guitar Steve Cropper played on "Dock of the Bay" is headed to the Smithsonian -- thanks to Roger Kaufman.

The guitar Steve Cropper played on “Dock of the Bay” is headed to the Smithsonian — thanks in part to Roger Kaufman.

Then he pulled out an amp. It was used to record “Green Onions” — the signature song Cropper, just 21 years old, wrote with Booker T.

As they chatted, Cropper talked about his career. He told Kaufman and Hasse how he’d written legendary songs like “Knock on Wood,” “Midnight Hour” and “Dock of the Bay.”

Cropper paved the way for more visits. Soon, Kaufman heads to Macon, Georgia to visit Otis Redding’s widow Zelma. He’ll also talk with Sam Moore, of Sam & Dave.

Kaufman has already met Vaneese Thomas, whose father Rufus wrote and sang “Walking the Dog.” The other day, they had lunch at Longshore.

Roger Kaufman, John Hasse and Steve Cropper form a formidable team. Together, they help — as Kaufman says, quoting Aretha Franklin — Memphis musicians finally get their Smithsonian “propers.”