Tag Archives: generators

Are We Having Fun Yet?

On Tuesday afternoon I said this would be a long one.

I may have been low-balling things.

As of 7 p.m. last night, Eversource was still “evaluating outages.” There’s a lot to evaluate, I’m sure. But more than 24 hours after what’s been called the 4th worst storm ever to hit the state, Westporters wonder whether power restoration will take days — or weeks.

It’s not as if Eversource has not prepared for storms. Despite what an “06880” commenter said yesterday, they have a robust preventive tree-trimming program. We’ve all seen the trucks on the roads this summer.

The lack of trucks now is getting people testy. So is the heat. And the search for WiFi and food.

We’re creatures of habit. We crave certainty. Between COVID-19 and Hurricane Isaias, we’re swamped by uncertainty, 24/7.

We would not like to click on Eversource’s outage map and see “Estimated repairs completed by Tuesday, August 11.”

But seeing “evaluating outages” is megawatts worse.

(PS: I’d love to post a photo of a utility crew at work. If you’ve got one, send it along!)


So if this is Connecticut’s “4th worst storm ever,” what were the 3 worse ones?

Probably Superstorm Sandy in October 2012, followed by the “Snotober” Halloween snowstorm in  2011, and Hurricane Gloria in 1985.

Don’t forget the 1955 hurricane, or 1938.

Where does this one rank on your list? Click “Comments” below.

This scene of Superstorm Sandy’s fury is from North Compo Road.


“06880” reader and longtime friend Terry Brannigan writes:

Lots of folks are bumping around in the dark, or looking for generators. Yet many Westporters have SUVs, minivans, Jeeps and other cars with AC adaptors.

You can run a cord from them into the house, and plug in plenty of lamps. W had 6 Tuesday night, no problem.

The longer the cord, the more you will lose amperage. Shorter is better, but be careful to park outside — not in a garage. You don’t want fumes!

The car is quiet, has low emissions and will idle for a couple of weeks on s full tank of gas. Those generators your neighbors have are loud, smelly and thirsty!

PS: Your car AC adaptor won’t power your refrigerator. But you will have light, music and the ability to charge batteries.


Plenty of Westporters have discovered the library’s Wifi. The building is closed, but coverage extends into Jesup Green and the Levitt Pavilion parking lot.

Some of those seeking service have (not surprisingly) forgotten that in addition to the power outage, we’re in the midst of a pandemic. With so many people trying to access the internet, it’s hard to stay socially distant.

So, a gentle reminder: Log on, and mask up!

A peaceful, post-Isaias scene on Jesup Green. Crowds are tighter closer to the building.  (Photo/Ted Horowitz)

 


I mentioned yesterday that Don Meno — Bill Taibe’s new restaurant replacing Jesup Green — is open for dinner. So is Walrus Alley next door (the former Rothbard + Larder).

And don’t forget Jeera Thai, the fantastic spot across the street from Design Within Reach. We’re lucky to have it in town — and luckier still that it’s one of the few restaurants with power.


I’m not sure if Balducci’s is still open. But yesterday they got kudos for serving customers (with non-perishables, of course), despite no power.

Starbuck’s is open downtown. Their Wifi and cell service are down though, so it’s cash only. And if you need an ATM, because who carries money these days? Good luck with that.

Stew Leonard’s is open too. In the hours after the storm, they went through an astonishing 20 pallets of ice. They’ll keep getting deliveries of essentials, and keep selling ’em.’


And finally … who would have thought last year that 2019 would be “the good old days”?!

Everything You Need To Know About Your Generator

With snow and high winds predicted for tomorrow, some Westporters may lose power.

Alert “06880” reader Bart Shuldman wants his neighbors — particularly those with new generators, or those who have not thought about their old ones in a while — to be prepared. He passes along these tips:

If you are lucky enough to have a generator, you need to know it needs oil. Depending on the size and type, when running it will need oil once a day, every other day, or every 3 days. Your generator will stop running if and when the oil pressure drops.

Here is how to see how much oil you have — and if necessary, how to change it:

Open the panels that surround the generator. Find the one where the electrical panel is. If the unit is on, turn off the unit first — not the breaker. Your switch should have a middle “off” position. Once the unit is off, wait 30 seconds — then turn the breaker off.

Once everything is off, look for the dipstick. Pull it out, wipe it clean, replace it and see if the oil shows up on the stick. There will be minimum and maximum marks. If below the minimum, add oil.

Find the oil turn cover on top of the unit. Open it up and add the oil (you may need a funnel). Add half a can, then use your dipstick and look again. Add until the oil is close to maximum level.

Once finished, replace the oil cover and put back the oil dipstick.

When starting your generator again, turn on the unit first — not the breaker. Wait a few seconds, then turn the breaker on. Then replace all covers. Your generator will work for at least another day.

Generator

If You’ve Got A Generator…

With the storm of the decade century millennium bearing down on us — the latest forecast is for up to 75 inches of snow, and winds nearing 12,000 miles an hour* — alert “06880” reader Bart Shuldman passes along these tips:

GeneratorIf you are lucky enough to have a generator, you need to know that depending on the size and type, it will need oil once a day, every other day, or every 3 days. Your generator will stop running if the oil pressure drops.

Here is how to see how much oil you have — and, if necessary, how to change it:

  • Open the panels surrounding the generator. Find the  electrical panel. If the unit is on, turn off the unit first — NOT THE BREAKER. Your switch should have a middle position that is “off.” Do not turn off the breaker just yet. Once the unit is off, wait 30 seconds — then turn the breaker off.
  • Once everything is off, look for the dipstick. Pull it out, wipe it clean, replace it and see if oil shows up on the stick. There will be minimum and maximum marks. If below the minimum, add oil.
  • Find the oil turn cover on top of the unit. Open it up and add the oil (you may need a funnel). Add about half a can, then use your dipstick and look again. Add until the oil is close to maximum level.
  • Once finished, replace the oil cover and put the oil dipstick back.

When starting the generator again, turn on the unit first — NOT THE BREAKER. Wait a few seconds, then turn the breaker on. Then replace all covers. You’ve kept your generator working for at least another day.

* Just kidding**

** I hope

Your Generator Needs Oil!

Alert “06880” reader Bart Shuldman sends along this reminder:

If you are lucky enough to have a generator but are still without power, you need to know your generator needs oil. Depending on the size and type, it will need oil once a day, every other day, or every 3 days. Your generator will stop running if and when the oil pressure drops.

Here is what to do to change the oil:

Open the panels that surround the generator.  Find the one where the electrical panel is. Turn off the unit first — NOT THE BREAKER. Your switch should have a middle position that is the “off” position.   Do not turn off the breaker just yet. Once the unit is off, wait 30 seconds — then turn the breaker off.

Once everything is off, look for dipstick. Pull it out, wipe it clean, replace it and see if the oil shows up on the stick.  There will be minimum and maximum marks. If below the minimum, add oil.

Find the oil turn cover on top of the unit. Open it up and add the oil (you may need a funnel). Add about a half a can, then use your dipstick and look again.  Add until the oil is close to maximum level.

Once finished, replace the oil cover and put back the oil dipstick.

When starting generator again, turn on the unit first — NOT THE BREAKER. Wait a few seconds, then turn the breaker on.  Then replace all covers. You’ve  kept your generator working for at least another day.