Tag Archives: Dana Noorily

Rick Dickinson Returns

When one door closes, another opens.

For Rick Dickinson, that cliché is true — literally.

Yesterday, the Peter’s Weston Market door closed for the final time.

This morning, it opens at The Granola Bar.

Rick spent the past 7 years running the market’s bakery. But for more than 2 decades before that, he was the much-loved (and very generous) owner of Great Cakes.

Rick Dickinson, with his great Great Cakes goods.

When that iconic bakery across from New Country Toyota closed 7 years ago tomorrow, Westport lost more than a spot to satisfy a sweet tooth and enjoy a leisurely coffee. It lost a business that always gave back to the community, and a businessman who cared deeply about the town.

Rick was Great Cakes. He worked there for 27 of its 32 years — the last 22 as owner.

As Peter’s Weston Market prepared to close, Rick began thinking about Granola Bar co-owner Julie Mountain. He called, asking if they needed help.

She was stunned. Julie and fellow owner Dana Noorily had just been talking about doing more with their baked goods.

The 3 met at the popular Playhouse Square café. Rapport was instant. “We had the same ideas. And we laughed a lot,” Rick says.

He quickly said: “I’m 150 percent in.”

They quickly said: “Great. You’ll start Monday!”

So Rick is already on the job. Unfortunately, he can’t whip up his new additions to the Granola Bar menu — challah, cakes, cookies, cupcakes, brownies — justlikethat.

Julie and Dana have already purchased a challah maker (from Peter’s). But other equipment is needed.

Items will be added gradually. Challah, he promises, is first.

Coming soon: new bakery items on The Granola Bar menu.

Rick is working out of Westport, supplying it and the 4 other Granola Bar locations (Fairfield, Stamford, Greenwich and Rye).

“Julie and Dana have such a successful business already,” he says. “This is a win-win for all of us. I haven’t been this excited in years. I feel like I’m coming home.”

Welcome home, Rick Dickinson.

And don’t let the door hit you on the way in.

Granola Tacos

Now in its 8th year, The Granola Bar is a Westport icon.

The Playhouse Square spot — which also offers coffee, smoothies, salads, wraps and more — has spawned 4 other locations (Fairfield, Stamford, Greenwich, Rye), and a booming catering business.

But no place is immune to COVID-19. The Granola Bar shut down early in the pandemic. When it reopened in May, owners Julie Mountain and Dana Noorily realized their business was solid from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. After that though, it flagged.

They were paying rent, and had fixed costs, for much longer than those 8 hours. Their executive chef, Neil Rohricht, is “amazing,” Mountain says.

So the owners asked themselves: “What does Westport need, and what would we be really good at?”

The answer: tacos!

Which is why The Granola Bar has introduced The Taco Bar.

From 4 to 8 p.m., 7 days a week, Westporters are scarfing up tacos (carnitas, pollo asado, papas con chorizo, pork belly pastor,, carne asada, charred cauliflower and vegan gringo), burritos (cali, mixtos, original), sides (guac, queso, chips, rice and frijoles borracho), and taco packs. Those include 12 “build your own” tacos, and a family dinner kit with a choice of 3 varieties). “Parents really appreciate the ease of feeding their families,” Mountain says.

A few of the Taco Bar’s items.

Like The Granola Bar, The Taco Bar is all takeout or delivery. There is no in-restaurant dining.

“Parents really appreciate the ease of feeding their families,” Mountain says. “And the deliciousness.

“We’re doing this with quality. We’re not just throwing something in a taco shell.”

Which is why — at The Taco Bar at The Granola Bar — you won’t  “granola tacos” on the menu.

(Click here for the main website.)

Westport Means Business

The event was called “Westport Means Business.”

But the crowd that packed the Westport Country Playhouse barn Tuesday night enjoyed plenty of laughs — plus wine and food — as 4 women described the many highs and few lows of owning a local business.

They ranged in age from 30s to 50s. They’ve been in operation from 20 years to just 1. Yet the quartet share joy in what they do, gratitude for the opportunity to do it — and a firm belief that Westport is a great place to pursue their dreams.

Second selectman Jennifer Tooker’s shirt motto — “Be Bold” — set the tone for the evening.

The evening was sponsored by the Westport Library, with support from the town. Second selectman Jennifer Tooker moderated, with ease and grace.

Julie Fountain and Dana Noorily — founders of The Granola Bar — are rock stars on the entrepreneurial scene. In 6 years they’ve gone from making desserts in their kitchens to owning 6 restaurants, here and in Westchester.

Interrupting each other, finishing their partner’s sentences and laughing often, the pair talked candidly about the challenges women face, from banks to stereotypes. They even pulled the plug once before they started, then forged ahead after Dana’s husband encouraged them to follow their dream.

When a mentor suggested that their planned granola manufacturing facility include something in the “front of the house,” they did not know the term.

Today they do. Proof of their success came a couple of weeks after they opened their first restaurant. It was filled with people they didn’t recognize. Their friends and family had supported them along the way — but now they had real customers.

Julie and Dana are proud to be setting an example for their young children, as “stay around” — rather than “stay at home” — moms. As they grow their business, there will be more obstacles — family and professional — to overcome. But they’re confident, excited, and proud that their journey began in their home town.

Jamie Camche has owned JL Rocks for 3 times as long: 18 years. Opening a jewelry store was a leap of faith. But her husband has supported her. She’s developed a strong and loyal clientele.

She noted the importance of having local ties too. Jamie was on a buying trip in Europe last September, when heavy rains flooded her Post Road East store.

Thankfully her landlord Mike Greenberg was there, hoisting buckets and bailing her out. He was at the Playhouse barn on Tuesday as well, supporting Jamie.

Participants in the “Westport Means Business” event included (from left) Kitt Shapiro (West), Jamie Camche (JL Rocks), 2nd selectman Jennifer Tooker, and Dana Noorily and Julie Mountain (Granola Bar).

Kitt Shapiro is 57. Yet she calls herself “the new kid on the block.” She’s owned West — the cool Post Road East clothing store — for only a year.

She’s been a 20-year resident of Westport, though. Those ties propelled her “leap of faith” into something she’d never done before.

“I feel so committed to this town, to small businesses, to being part of the tapestry of the community,” Kitt explained. “It’s my home.

West is just around the corner from Main Street, on Post Road East.

“We all know retail has changed,” she added. “But I truly believe local retailers are not going away. People want to touch, see and feel merchandise. They want to interact with other human beings. They’ll seek out people who are kind and smile.”

When Tooker asked for questions, an audience member wondered why none of the 4 businesses were on Main Street.

“We can’t afford it,” Julie said. “But we can’t afford a lot of Main Streets.”

“A town is more than Main Street,” Kitt added.

Third selectman Melissa Kane agreed. Getting the word out about options beyond that small, chain-dominated stretch of downtown is important to retailers and town officials alike, she said.

“We have not done a great job of that,” she admitted. “We need a professional initiative.” Kane said the town is working with a national wayfaring firm, developing signage and strategies to help residents as well as visitors realize the wealth of small, local businesses surrounding Main Street — and where to park, and walk to find them.

Julie praised Westport officials from departments like Fire and Health, for making life easy for entrepreneurs. Westport is the easiest to work with, of their 6 locations (Westchester is the toughest).

“The first health inspection could have been the scariest experience of our life. It wasn’t,” she said.

In her opening remarks Tooker noted that the town, library, Westport Downtown Merchants Association and Chamber of Commerce are all spreading the news: Westport is a great place to live, raise a family — and grow and launch a business.

Or, as Julie Mountain, Dana Noorily, Jamie Camche and Kitt Shapiro reiterated: Westport is open for — and to — business.