Tag Archives: Carson Einarsen

Connor And Carson Einarsen’s Inconsistent Story

Move over, “The Swimmer.” Step aside, “Stepford Wives.”

“An Inconsistent Story in Stealing” is coming to town.

No, it’s not a big-budget, full-length feature film. But the movie being shot in Westport later this summer has something those 2 projects — and nearly every other film made here — did not:

Connor and Carson Einarsen.

The talented Staples alums — Connor graduated last year from Carleton College, with a degree in cinema and media studies; Carson followed this year from Savannah College of Art and Design, majoring in film and TV — are preparing their 2nd shoot.

Two years ago, the brothers made “Ryan Hood,” a 60-minute film for just $40. (They rented jackets for police officers).

Carson (left) and Connor (middle) Einarsen, directing "Ryan Hood."

Carson (left) and Connor (middle) Einarsen, directing “Ryan Hood.”

This one — “An Inconsistent Story in Stealing” — is more ambitious. Written by Carson, the neo-noir movie is about a former thief who is sucked back into the town she despises, to hunt down something she stole long ago.

There are 17 speaking parts, and 40 locations. One-third of the film will be shot at night, something most directors shy away from.

Pre-production takes place in June and July. Shooting is set for the 1st 3 weeks of August. In October “An Inconsistent Story” will be screened for the town. Then it’s off to film festivals around the world.

The Westport Library is helping, with a little bit of capital and a lot of resources. It’s one more way for the MakerSpace to expand its creative mission, Connor says.

In return, he and Carson will lead library classes for aspiring young filmmakers, and offer a film appreciation course.

The brothers are looking for actors and production assistants. If you’re interested, contact inconsistentstory@gmail.com.

 

 

Staples Grads Share $317,000

With little fanfare — but plenty of emotion — 122 Staples High School seniors and graduates picked up $317,000 in scholarship money Wednesday night.

The 70th annual Staples Tuition Grants ceremony did not get much press. But for the scores of soon-to-be grads — and alums currently in school — financial aid can be a life-changing experience.

STG is one of Westport’s feel-good stories.

Dr. Al Beasley poses with Megumi Asada, a graduating senior who received the Dr. Jean Beasley Memorial Award. Both Dr. Beasleys were beloved pediatricians; Megumi is considering a career in medicine.

Dr. Al Beasley poses with Megumi Asada, a graduating senior who received the Dr. Jean Beasley Memorial Award. Both Dr. Beasleys were beloved pediatricians; Megumi is considering a career in medicine. (Photos by Pam Einarsen)

At Wednesday’s ceremony, Andre Lambros described how his SHS Class of 1981 donated excess reunion funds to the organization last year — and felt so good, they decided to set up an annual award in their name.

Staples 2012 grad Carson Einarsen gave a rousing and inspiring speech. The tuition grant that helps him attend Savannah College of Art and Design is clearly money well spent.

(From left) Juan Castro, Justin Jones and Trevor Lally join Staples Tuition Grants co-chair Diana Bowes Weller.

(From left) Juan Castro, Justin Jones and Trevor Lally join Staples Tuition Grants co-chair Diana Bowes Weller.

Among the many representatives of named award donors was Maureen Kowall. She flew up from Florida for the ceremony. A scholarship honors her son Michael, who died when he was just 13. He would have been 40 this year.

Also on hand: Christopher Jones. He graduated in 1958 — the last Staples class in the building on Riverside Avenue. Fifty-five years later he’s initiated an award celebrating his father, noted Westporter Robert Haydon Jones.

Susan Malloy (left) -- who has a Scholarship in the Arts named after her -- stands with Ashley Hyun and her father John. Ashley will attend Pratt, and hopes to be an artist or art educator.

Susan Malloy (left) — who has a Scholarship in the Arts named after her — stands with Ashley Hyun and her father John. Ashley will attend Pratt, and hopes to be an artist or art educator.

After the final name was called, and the applause died down, Rondi Charleston smiled. Last year, she and her husband Steve Ruchefsky started an award in honor of her father, Rolf Charleston.

Rhondi said, “For a long time, I’ve been looking for the heart of Westport. Now I think I’ve found it.”

Many of the 122 Staples Tuition Grants recipients celebrate their awards in the courtyard. (Photos by Pam Einarsen)

Many of the 122 Staples Tuition Grants recipients celebrate their awards.

Back To 365 Drawing Boards

For Carson Einarsen, this past year felt like “back to the drawing board.”

365 times.

Carson — a rising senior at Staples — has always liked art.  He spent last summer at Vermont’s Center for Cartoon Studies.  This month, at the Savannah College of Art and Design, he studied comic and sequential art, and animation.

He doesn’t just scribble.  “Life drawing is required for comic art,” Carson says.  “So I do a lot of that.”

Carson does a lot of drawing, period.

Last July, feeling he did not draw faces well, Carson set a goal.  Every day, he’d find a friend’s face on Facebook — then draw it.

And he’d do it every day for a full year.

Carson Einarsen's favorite: a fisheye portrait.

Carson usually drew right before bed.  He’d make an initial pencil sketch on a 3×5 card, then ink it over.  He scanned each drawing — and the photo he used — into his computer.  He posted them all in a Facebook album.  (Search “The fACEs Project” to find it.)

His final drawing — #365 — was Monday night.

“Some were really good.  Some were bad,” Carson says.  “It depended how I felt.”

The 1st sketches took “about 30 seconds.”  By the end, they took 20 minutes.

“I got a lot better — and not just drawing faces,” Carson notes.  “I’m much more attuned now to what makes something look the way it does.”

One of the hardest parts of the project — beyond the discipline of drawing every day — was working from photographs.  “Everything looks flat,” Carson explains.  “When you draw from life, it looks 3D.  I had to work hard to make my drawings look like an actual person.”

Like any artist, Carson has his favorite:  the girl whose Facebook photo showed her looking at a fisheye lens.  “Her face was really distorted,” he says.

Carson's self-portrait -- midway through the project, of himself midway to his current age.

Carson created several “milestone” sketches.  For #184 — the halfway point — he drew himself at half his current age.  Monday’s final drawing shows the same person he did for #1:  classmate Elliott Enriquez.

Last winter, the Westport Arts Center included 80 of Carson’s works in their “Kid Culture” exhibition.  Other than that, though, he hasn’t publicized his project.  It’s his; his personal — and, finally, it’s finished.

So what’s next?

“A comic book series,” Carson says.  “I want to apply everything I’ve learned to comic work.”

He plans to draw one page a week.

For a year?

“No!” he says emphatically.  “I want a different goal — something like 60 pages.”

He pauses, then laughs.

“Wait!  That’s more than a year!”

Back to the drawing board…

Just a few of Carson Einarsen's 365 sketches.