Roundup: Low Bridge, Levitt, Lightning Bug …

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One question should be asked at every truck rental place in the country: “What do you do when you see the Saugatuck Avenue railroad underpass in Westport? A) Find an alternate route. B) Plow straight ahead and destroy our truck.”

That might avoid some — but, human beings being who they are, probably not all — of the regular shearings we see on just south of I-95 Exit 17. Yesterday was typical.

So were the inevitable traffic tie-ups. (Hat tip: Dan Vener) 

(Photo/Josh Stein)

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Billy & the Showmen brought their powerful sound to the Levitt Pavilion last night. It was their 4th appearance there, to the delight of their many local fans.

This week’s Levitt lineup: Treehouse Comedy (Tuesday); LucyKalantori & the Jazz Cats (Wednesday); Barboletta: A Tribute to Santana (Thursday); Paul Beaubrum (Friday); Rita Harvey: A Tribute to Linda Ronstadt (Saturday).

Click here for times and (free) ticket details.

Billy & the Showmen (Photo/JC Martin)

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A band holes up in a rented house in upstate New York. They rehearse and record an album there. Fame ensues.

Sounds like The Band? It also applies to Lightning Bug. Well, the first 2 parts, anyway. Fame may be right around the corner.

Their 3rd album — “A Color of the Sky” — got good press in Newsweek recently. The story includes quotes from guitarist Kevin Copeland, a 2010 Staples High School graduate.

Describing the Catskills house, he says: “It was really cozy, and I feel like we were all much closer together than we would be in a studio and also it was snowing the whole time. [It] definitely seeped into the record.”

Copeland calls the group’s music “more like classical music or film scoring, that’s what it feels like. Sheryl Crow is a big inspiration. I laugh when I say it, but I’m serious. I think she effortlessly blends these sort of super-catchy melodies with country and rock in a way that I feel like no one ever does.”

Click here for the full story. (Hat tip: Iain Bruce)

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Sunny the Duck is back.

He (she? it?) bobs in the Saugatuck Congregational Church parking lot. The smaller version of the enormous yellow bird advertises Westport Sunrise Rotary’s 12th annual Duck Race

it’s different than the previous ones. To avoid big crowds, there’s no actual race. Winners will be selected in a random drawing on dry land August 6.

But the prizes are Duck Race-worthy: one $5,000 Visa gift card; one $2,000 Visa gift card, and 6 $500 Visa gift cards. Money raised helps fund the Sunrise Rotary’s many excellent charitable programs.

Tickets are $25 each. Click here to purchase.

(Photo/Mike Hibbard)

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Today’s forecast is for showers and thunderstorms before 2 p.m., then cloudy.

So njoy Wendy Levy’s “Westport … Naturally” photo, taken earlier this summer.

(Photo/Wendy Levy)

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The story about Kevin Copeland’s band’s Catskills house (above) got me thinking about The Band.

What a great few time those “Big Pink” months must have been.

Of course, in Westport it would have been torn down years ago.

3 responses to “Roundup: Low Bridge, Levitt, Lightning Bug …

  1. My husband and I drove under the Saugauck Ave/Compo Rd underpass today. I couldn’t help but think that if the town spray painted a message that would catch the eyes of the truckers onto the steel beams, that maybe that would help?? There is plenty of room for some bright orange, large letters saying NO TRUCKS!! Just a thought…..

    • That won’t do much of anything, advance notice is needed. Flashing lights, alarm buzzers, etc. Problem is the intersection is so tight, not much runway. Add to that the intersection is about to get more chaotic with the Saugatuck development…

  2. Elizabeth Thibault

    Every RR underpass turns box trucks into sardine cans on an all too frequent basis. They need the warning pipes that hang down, 10 to 20 feet before the driver hits the bridge. They also need alternate route instructions posted for the drivers, because many more driving these trucks are using consumer mapping software which does not know to avoid these routes, like commercial trucking software does.

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