Concours, Of Course

Today’s 1st-ever “Concours d’Caffeine” was a roaring success.

No. there were not a lot of loud engines.

Just plenty of cars — antiques, classics, limited editions, expensive, and very cool ones.

You did not have to be an automotive buff to admire the buffed, shining vehicles. All you needed was an admiring eye, and a cup of coffee as you strolled around the train station.

The Concours was sponsored by the Westport Weston Chamber of Commerce, with help from Bill Scheffler, John Shuck, Tim Walsh and Frank Taylor.

Let’s hope it becomes an annual tradition. Maybe one day my 2000 Camry will fit right in.

(NOTE:  Click or hover on any photo to enlarge.)

Little GTO, you're really lookin' fine...

Little GTO, you’re really lookin’ fine…

Like Jaguars today, this 1948 model must have been the envy of many other drivers.

Like Jaguars today, this 1948 model must have been the envy of many other drivers.

This 1915 Trumbull was built in Bridgeport. There were 20 on the Lusitania when it was sunk by the Germans that year. Also on board: Isaac Trumbull, who was traveling to Europe to close a deal. His company went down with the ship.

This 1915 Trumbull was built in Bridgeport. There were 20 on the Lusitania when it was sunk by the Germans. Also on board: Isaac Trumbull, who was traveling to Europe to close a deal. His company went down with the ship.

George Dragone -- of Dragone Classic Motorcars -- loves this 1928 Packard. He says it represents a transition from "boxy, unexciting" cars that preceded it, to "beautifully styled ones"that followed.

George Dragone — of Dragone Classic Motorcars — loves this 1928 Packard. He says it represents a transition from “boxy, unexciting” cars that preceded it, to “beautifully styled ones” that followed.

Only in Westport do 8-year-olds like Max Manchester have their own Escalades.

Only in Westport do 8-year-olds like Max Manchester have their own Escalades.

Two symbols of American automotive power: a Chevrolet (front) and Ford (Mustang Mach 1).

Two symbols of American automotive power: a Chevy and Ford (Mustang Mach 1).

Among the attendees at Concours d'Caffeine: Jim Motovalli, a 1970 Staples graduate and noted car journalist (New York Times, NPR's Car Talk, etc.).

Among the attendees at Concours d’Caffeine: Jim Motovalli, a 1970 Staples graduate and noted New York Times and NPR car journalist.

Most classic cars don't have stickers. The owner of this one has a good sense of humor.

Most classic cars don’t have stickers. The owner of this one has a good sense of humor.

Why can't the railroad station always look like this?

Why can’t the railroad station always look like this?

 

5 responses to “Concours, Of Course

  1. Tres elegant! Vintage car clubs are fascinating groups, all inspired by history.
    In future, why not a “Circuit de Westport”? Your new Masarati dealership could host. I’m sure no one would object.

    • Well, so far there have been issues with people taking Maseratis on test drives around town and seeing how fast they really go!

  2. I loved theTrumbull (I lived in Trumbull at one time). I wish they would make a Westport. A Westport should have a long hood to stick out into traffic before pulling out onto the Post Road and be able to park anywhere.

  3. Loved it!! Let’s do it again

  4. Julie Fatherley

    Dan Hermann: Well Dan, they didn’t make a Westport but someone did make a Compo Stapler years ago. Small comfort, perhaps, but at least
    we manufactured something that was widely used. Re: the car show,
    my heart was racing as I admired the Locomobile and Trumbull. Test
    drivers of the early Locomobiles would install a wooden bench on the
    chassis of a Locomobile and drive it up Sport Hill Road in Easton in
    high gear. If the car made it, it was ready to sell. I can imagine what it
    must have sounded like in the bucolic farmland of Easton as these monsters
    roared up the hill without the benefit of a muffler. Ah, the joy of early
    Connecticut automotive history.