Tag Archives: Mario Viola

Unsung Hero Needs Help

In June, “0688o” featured Mario Viola as an Unsung Hero.

The Coleytown and Saugatuck Elementary School bus driver truly went “the extra mile.”

He loves “his” children. He decorates his bus for holidays, shows up for their concerts, and keeps everyone excited for school.

When a youngster was sick, Mario gave him his hat to make him feel better.

On the last day of school, the driver took everyone to Carvel — and treated!

Mario Viola, and a young friend.

Recently, as he and his wife rode a motorcycle, they were hit by a drunk driver.

Mario is recovering at home. Meanwhile, his medical bills mount. Parents have created a GoFundMe page to help.

Mario Viola has been there for our children. Now we can be there for him. (Click here to help.)

Mario Viola and his happy kids, at Carvel.

Unsung Hero: Special Bus Driver Edition

A few hours ago, I posted this week’s Unsung Heroes story. Kudos to the traffic agents, who put up with all kinds of weather (and all kinds of drivers) to make sure our kids (and teachers) arrive at school safe and sound.

I just found out about another person who makes school special. Like the traffic cops, he’s not a Board of Education employee. But he’s as important as any educator.

Mario Viola drives bus routes for Coleytown and Saugatuck Elementary Schools. He truly goes “the extra mile.”

Grateful parent Lisa Newman says, “He tirelessly loves and cares for our children. He decorates his bus for holidays, shows up for their concerts, and keeps everyone excited for school.”

One day, Lisa’s son had an as-yet-undiscovered fever. He arrived home wearing Mario’s hat. The driver had given it to him to make him feel better. (“It worked!” she says).

Mario Viola, and Lisa Newman’s son.

School ended yesterday. But today, the kids on his routes enjoyed one last day with Mario.

He invited them all to Carvel for ice cream — and treated every one!

Mario Viola and his happy kids, at Carvel today.

Thanks, Mario Viola, for doing so many little things, for so long, for so many. Long after these youngsters forget most of what went on this year, they will remember your kindness, and you.

(Hat tip: Heather Sinclair)