9/11: A Lost Video, Found In A Pandemic

Alert “06880” reader Robin Gusick writes:

The anniversary of 9/11 always takes me back to when I lived in downtown New York, on 14th Street and Avenue A with my husband Dave and our 6-month old baby Sam.

Early that morning, a friend called and said, “you better put on the TV – now.” We watched in horror and disbelief the footage of the first plane hitting.

Sam Gusick with his young parents, Dave and Robin.

We had plans to take Sam to his first baby music class, and wondered whether to go or not. Since we presumed the plane crash to be a terrible accident, we put Sam in his stroller and walked outside.

On the way we saw people huddling around a Radio Shack with multiple TV sets in the windows, all showing the first plane crashing into the World Trade Center. We considered heading home, but figured we might as well go to the class as a distraction.

Ten minutes in, the teacher stopped playing her guitar and said, “I’m sorry, but it just seems wrong to sing when the world is falling apart. I just heard that a second plane hit. This is not an accident — it’s a terrorist attack.”

As we rushed out and hurried home with Sam back in his stroller, we saw massive smoke rising up from further downtown. People watched TVs in windows all along Union Square. They stood silently in shock, watching both towers fall.

Back in our apartment, we put Sam in his “exersaucer” and watched TV — and watched and watched, in horror. We saw smoke from our apartment windows, and smelled the most toxic smell imaginable.

It was particularly surreal to see this innocent 6-month old baby staring at the TV, and wonder what kind of world he would grow up in. We videotaped that moment on our bulky camcorder, knowing one day we would want to show Sam.

Fast forward 18 years to September 11, 2018. Sam is a senior at Staples High School (we moved to Westport when he was 2). I told him a bit of our story of that somber day, mentioning I had a videotape somewhere. He said, “Wow, I’d really like to see that.”

I was glad he was way too young to remember that awful day. I tried to explain to him that when you go through  something like 9/11, you forever see the world through a different lens.

Sam headed off to the University of Vermont the following fall. My first baby quickly found “his people” and his “happy place” in Burlington. He came home for spring break in March. The pandemic hit, and his time in Vermont came to a screeching halt. Sam said, “My generation really has not lived through anything major like this… well, except September 11th. But I have no memory of that.”

Sam Gusick (Photo/Kerry Long)

Sam’s last 2 months of school were at home with no friends, no campus, no Burlington. He was a good sport. He was happy to have Zoom calls, and movie nights with his college buddies. There were silver linings: family dinners that never fit into his busy Staples Players and Orphenians schedule, and decluttering and simplifying our home.

During one of those long pandemic days in March, sorting through mountains of old papers while watching “Tiger King” with Sam, I felt a small item mixed in with the papers: a videotape labeled “Sam — September 11th.” It was a pandemic miracle!

However, the miracle was trapped in what seemed like caveman technology. Plus every business was shutting down. I left that tape on my night table, though.  It took until today — September 11, 2020 — for me to research how to transfer that camcorder video to a watchable format.

And so, my 9/11 “gift” to Sam (who is back at UVM now) is this video, along with a message: Life can change in an instant.

It did on 9/11/01, and it did this past March. Keep being the resilient, positive man you have grown to be. Keep smiling like you did in that exersaucer on that very, very sad day.

Even if it’s under your mask. Click below for the 9/11 video.

10 responses to “9/11: A Lost Video, Found In A Pandemic

  1. Absolutely gut wrenching in so many ways but what a gift to share…thank you Robin and Dave for sharing this story and video and thank you Dan for posting! Best of luck to Sam!

  2. I didn’t know what to expect clicking through to that video, but it’s pretty chilling. Powerful stuff to see all the smoke through the apartment window, the live TV coverage, and the parents with their toddler staying calm through it all.

  3. Thanks for the story, Dan. Looking back at this harrowing moment is very powerful, now knowing how unaware I was of the tragedy unfolding around me. Such a terrible thing.

  4. Unbelievably amazing touching story and Robin’s writing is so beautiful and emotional. Love you and you r right, I always told you that you are a fantastic writer. Mom

  5. Celeste Champagne

    So wonderful to see this video amid memories of that terrible day. Thanks for sharing.

  6. I remember the fear and unsettled feeling I had at home in Westport with my two little ones. Roaming around NYC with Sam, and being so close must have been so terrifying for you.
    Thank you for sharing your personal account with us, and all the best to Sam at UVM. Here’s to lots of smiles even if it’s behind a mask.

  7. Thank you for sharing this. To everyone who remembers. Write down your memories of that fateful day, where you were , what you were doing, what you thought and about the days moving forward. It is a part of history and your great, great, grandchildren will be grateful as will future historians. First person accounts flesh out facts with feelings and give depth and meaning.

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