Protect Longshore’s Plover

Alert — and environmentally conscious — “06880” reader Maureen Choe and her 7-year-old daughter had a magical morning walk with their dog Cookie this morning.

Around 8:15 a.m., Mirabelle discovered a perfect intact nest with a nervous squeaking mother bird nearby.

Maureen and Mirabelle think is a piping plover’s nest. They spotted beautiful eggs out in the open, at risk for dogs, other animals or curious people.

They went home, made a sign and put it up, warning folks to stay away.

They made calls to several local organizations. They finally reached Becky Newman, naturalist at Earthplace. She agreed that the public should remain far from the nest.

Becky also provided contacts at the Audubon Society in Milford, which holds special training programs on piping plovers.

It may not be a piping plover, Maureen notes. She’s unsure if it’s protected by the state or not.

Still, she says, it’s a vulnerable bird’s nest, out in the open near the Longshore pool. She hopes people give the bird — shown here sitting on her nest — and her eggs their space.

(Photos/Maureen Choe)

8 responses to “Protect Longshore’s Plover

  1. Killdeer Plover…that’s what they do.
    Saw one at one of my son’s soccer games years ago, nesting with eggs along the side the field…
    Very thoughtful of Mirabelle to put up a sign!
    Cool bird

  2. Nice work! Our wildlife is under enough pressure as it is. Hopefully Parks and Rec, which just got caught dumping mountains of contaminated fill in a meadow at Barons South Park, will see the sign and leave this bird and her nest in peace.

  3. Sharon Paulsen

    This makes me happy!

  4. Dan it is a killdear nest, and the babies are adorable! Yes stay away from the nest, and let the mother incubate!

  5. The Killdeer will often feign injury and flutter about to keep you focused on her and not the nest. Beautiful bird.

  6. Thanks you two for your alertness and
    kindness ☀️😊

  7. Bob Fatherley

    This bird with the ground nest is a Kildeer. The eggs have wonderful
    protective coloration. The bird is dressed in his/her elegant tuxedo.
    They will linger on or around the nest and if any one or anything gets too
    close, bird will flutter its wings and lead the intruder away from the nest.
    The last time I saw this scene was next to a gravestone in a Darien, CT
    cemetery.

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