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Roundup: Signs, Art Sale, More


A reader writes:

“Our ‘Black Lives Matter’ sign was stolen from our front yard. We paid for it; it was up for weeks, and we live on a side street.

“I am stunned, having grown up in this town. We disagreed, we debated, but we didn’t do warfare with political signs.

“The sign was on our property. How is this not an invasion of my property? How is it not the bullying or pummeling in the name of what you don’t like or believe?

“Black lives matter. They still matter, even when you steal signs.”


Speaking of political signs: An Old Hill resident offers this warning to a possible thief:

(Photo/Frank Rosen)


The Artists Collective of Westport sponsors an outdoor trunk show of “affordable art” this Saturday (October 17, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Westport Playhouse parking lot).

Artists will display their works from in and around their cars. All COVID restrictions will be followed. But, the Collective says, “we can’t mask our excitement!”


Lindsey Blaivas spotted this house on Long Lots Road. “Instead of hauling away this magnificent tree that fell during one of our many storms, they landscaped around it,” she writes.

“It is a piece of art — and a tribute to the magical gifts that nature sometimes leaves us.”

(Photo/Lindsey Blaivas)


Like many venues, Longshore has been hit hard by the coronavirus.

Yesterday, however, Bruce McFadden spotted a ceremony taking place. It was not big — and there seemed to be plenty of space between guests and tables. Still, it was a nice reminder of a bit of normalcy.

(Photo/Bruce McFadden)

And finally … on Columbus Day, let’s honor the people who knew this land long before the Europeans “discovered” it. Songwriter/saxophonist Jim Pepper adapted “Witchi Tai To” from an ancient chant he learned from his Native American grandfather. It is still the only song in the history of Billboard’s pop chart to feature a Native American chant.

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