Tag Archives: Zelda Fitzgerald

Sam Waterston Channels F. Scott And Zelda

Nearly a century after F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald lived there, 244 South Compo Road hosted another famous name.

Actor Sam Waterston recently toured the historic home, now owned by Jeannine Flower. He then sat for an interview with Professor Walter Raubichek, a noted Fitzgerald scholar at Pace University.

The walk-through and interview were filmed by Westporters Deej Webb and Robert Steven Williams. They’re working on a project about Fitzgerald’s time in town.

Channeling F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald (from left): Professor Walter Raubicheck, Sam Waterston, Robert Steven Williams, Jeannine Flower and Deej Webb.

Channeling F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald (from left): Robert Steven Williams, Sam Waterston, Professor Walter Raubicheck, Jeannine Flower and Deej Webb.

The filmmakers believe that Fitzgerald’s 6 months in Westport — May through October, 1920 — were pivotal to his writing.

(It was certainly pivotal to the newly married couple’s relationship. According to Webb and Williams, “their love was still in full bloom.”)

Scott wrote in his essay “100 False Starts” that a writer has 2 or 3 great life experiences, then recycles them over and over.

“We’ve set out to prove that Westport is one of those great experiences,” the filmmakers says. “We’re posing this to the international Fitzgerald community, and getting remarkable responses. That journey is what this film is all about.”

The film will premiere at the Westport Historical Society. No word on whether Sam Waterston will attend.

F. Scott Fitzgerald: The Movie

Last spring, Westport Historical Society audiences loved Robert Steven Williams’ video featuring famous writers who lived here.

But Williams’ budget had been “zero.” He knew he could do better.

The segment on F. Scott Fitzgerald was particularly intriguing, for viewers and the filmmaker himself. To move forward, Williams contacted Westport resident Richard “Deej” Webb — an amateur historian and Fitzgerald buff — who offered to help.

The pair raised $20,000 for a film. Shooting began this summer.

Williams and Webb are giving the WHS rights for unlimited use and sale, including the premiere as a fundraiser. Attorney Alan Neigher is donating his time for legal issues, while Keir Dullea will narrate the film for a nominal fee.

Earlier this month, Williams and Webb interviewed Barbara Probst Solomon. In 1996 she wrote a groundbreaking New Yorker story linking Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby and Westport. For Williams, she recalled her childhood in Westport, and provided insights into F. Scott and Zelda’s own summer here in 1920.

F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, in front of what appears to be their Westport home.

F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, in front of what appears to be their Westport home.

That evening, the filmmakers shot the Bridge Street bridge. The scattered lights were described in The Beautiful and Damned, which Fitzgerald wrote while in Westport.

The next day they filmed Main Street without traffic, and Nyala Farms (between Green’s Farms Road and the Sherwood Island connector).

Then came the coup de grace: the Fitzgerald house on South Compo. Built in 1758, and called Wakeman Farm in 1920, it looks much the same today as it did then.

F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald slept -- and partied -- here.

F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald slept — and partied — here.

“I wasn’t expecting Jeannine Flower, one of the owners, to be there,” Williams said on his blog.

“But she not only welcomed us into her home, she took the time to explain what she knew about the house. She was extremely knowledgeable about Scott and Zelda’s time there, and she was passionate and committed.”

Williams and Webb are passionate and committed too. They love this project — though a “black hole” is the unknown cost of securing the rights to photographs, archival footage, and use of lines from Gatsby.

But they’re forging ahead. Meanwhile, Webb is getting preparing to present the film’s thesis in November at a Fitzgerald academic conference in Montgomery, Alabama. That’s where Zelda was born.

Even in 1920, Westport must have seemed like a far different world.

PS: According to Williams, the Fitzgerald home in Westport is up for sale. It can be yours for $2,750,000.

Party Like A Gatsby

If you weren’t at Gerry Kuroghlian’s fascinating talk about F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald’s time in Westport last Saturday — well, the event was last Saturday; they were here in 1920 — you were not alone.

F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald slept -- and partied -- here.

F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald slept — and partied — here.

The only folks who heard the beloved former Staples English teacher were the lucky 20 whose names were drawn after attending WestportREADS events all last month. (The book WestportREADS read was The Great Gatsby. The talk was held in the actual home the Fitzgeralds lived in during their wild time here.)

In addition to snapshots of Westport back in the day — most of the town was farmland, Saugatuck was an isolated area populated by immigrants, Green’s Farms was the wealthiest part of town — “Dr. K” painted a vivid picture of Westport’s wild side.

  • A Marmon.

    A Marmon.

    In the summer of 1920, Scott and Zelda put most of their money into a 1917 Marmon. They set out on a drive to the country, even though neither of them had had driving lessons. They stopped in Rye, but Zelda didn’t like it. So they headed for Lake Champlain, stopping in Westport for lunch. With Zelda at the wheel they crashed into a fire plug on Main Street, near what is now Onion Alley. The car was gutted.

  • They ended up living for a few months at 244 Compo Road South. Built in 1758, it was known as a “Switch House” — a switching station for people coming from downtown by trolley to switch to another trolley to get to the beach. Obviously, if you’d just gutted your car…
  • F. Scott and Zelda partied hard, hitting all of the speakeasies around. (There were plenty.) Their favorite drink was orange juice and gin.

Kuroghlian said that Fitzgerald’s books The Beautiful and the Damned and The Great Gatsby were heavily influenced by his time in Westport. The house was strong enough to withstand huge parties, while Westport — which voted against Prohibition — was a perfect place for the hard-living couple.

Great Gatsby partyIf you missed Saturday’s discussion — or any other WestportREADS event — you’ve got one more chance. And this final chapter may be only slightly less crazy than F. Scott and Zelda’s high-flying summer.

This Saturday night, the Westport Library turns into a speakeasy. There will be  swanky gin cocktails (legal, now), live jazz and dancing.

The only way to attend is by registering online (click here). You’ll receive a password to get in.

Guests are encouraged to wear Roaring ’20s garb.

Which, according to some reports, is a lot more than F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald wore to some of their Westport parties.