Category Archives: Beach

Pete Aitkin Buys A New Black Duck

If you know the Black Duck — and who doesn’t? — you know the popular riverfront barge/bar/restaurant/hangout shares a name with the Black Duck racing boat.

Owner Pete Aitkin just received his latest toy: a custom-built 30-foot twin 300-horse Merc speedboat.

Last night, the Duck docked at the Duck.

This morning, Pete pulled it out of the water at Compo. He’ll store it till next year.

The Black Duck, with Pete Aitken at the helm.

The Black Duck, with Pete Aitkin at the helm.

The Black Duck — food version — put Westport on the “Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives” map.

The maritime Black Duck did the same for offshore boat racing.

Tutti’s, Tarantino’s, Tarry Lodge: Top that!

(Hat tip: Randy Chiristophersen)

Old Tree + New Home = ?

For decades, this Bluewater Hill tree has been a neighborhood landmark:

Bluewater Hill tree

But the house will soon be torn down.

Will the tree be sacrificed — or saved?

No one knows.

And everyone worries.

Not Just Another Teardown

Realtors love new construction: It sells. But there’s something to be said about old homes too — especially when the teardown is one you grew up in.

Back in the day, Toni Horton was a 1978 graduate of Staples. Today she’s Toni Mickiewicz, and a William Raveis realtor. She also blogs about real estate trends and local news on “From Town to Shore.” Yesterday, she wrote about another teardown. This one is personal: It’s the home she grew up in.

Toni says:

I was recently told that my mother’s house in Westport had a demolition sign on it. Even though we sold it three years ago, it will always be “my mother’s house.” Well, that is until it’s torn down.

The house of Toni's youth.

The house of Toni’s youth.

It wasn’t my favorite house. I actually always thought that it should be torn down. It was a combination of stages in my mother’s life. It started as a little tiny beach house with no heat and it sat on wine barrels. It gradually grew to have an architecturally designed front section with two floors that looked a little like a church.

When I went off to college it grew a backside with 2 floors, 4 bedrooms and 3 additional bathrooms. It never really matched the front, or anything else for that matter, but it added square footage and allowed my mother to rent it out regularly as we all moved out and she had to spend most of her time caring for my grandmother in Norwalk. The house worked for her and it gave her children what she wanted all along — a place to call home, an education in a town with a reputation for excellence, and a “castle” by the water.

Once, Toni asked her mother if there was room for a pool. Her mom replied: 

“Why would you want a pool when we have the beach?”  I was much older when I finally got how blessed we were to live where we did.

Views of the water, from the home.

Views of the water, from the home.

When I moved back to Westport — a grown-up having been married, raised children, divorced, and re-inventing myself — my mother let me live at the house, as a paid renter of course, but the house was there for me. It was my transitional home for 6 years. It wasn’t perfect, but it was my home, a place to provide my youngest with an education in a town known for excellence. It was our “castle” by the water.

Now it will be torn down. And while I know it’s the right thing to do to get the “highest and best use of the land” for the new owner, it still made me more emotional than I ever imagined.

This was my home, where I grew up and where I sought refuge. It provided me, my siblings, many cousins and lots of renters over the years, a lot of fun memories along with the challenges that an imperfect house can provide. It will only be in my memory now and that is a little sad for me.

Toni knows she is not alone. Many friends have experienced similar situations. And, she adds:

Toni Mickiewicz

Toni Mickiewicz

Much of the landscape of my childhood is gone. Allen’s Clam House, where I used to work in the kitchen, has been gone for a long time. Ten Pond Edge Road, where I lived with my “other” family when my mom rented out the house for the summer, has been torn down as well.

I could go on, but what I really want to say is that after tearing up a little and feeling woeful for a time, I realize that it is okay. I am who I am from my experiences and life lessons in this town and in this home, and I will always have that.

Thanks Mom, for what you did for us and allowing us to grow up in a castle by the water.

(To read Toni’s full blog, click for “From Town to Shore.”)

It’s Not Politically Correct To Thank Christopher Columbus, But…

…if not for him in 1492, we might not be here to enjoy this in 2014:

Beach - October 12 2014

Beach 1 - October 12 2014

Happy Columbus Day!

How Much Does It Cost To Buy A Beachfront Restaurant In Westport?

$2 million.

That’s the price “233 LLC” recently paid “Beachhouse LLC” for the property at 233 Hillspoint Road — aka Positano’s.

If the rumors that the waterfront restaurant will be turned into a private home are true, it will mark the 1st new residence on that stretch of Hillspoint Road since the pavilion on Schlaet’s Point was demolished 3 decades ago.

Positano's, on Hillspoint Road near Elvira's, may soon go the way...

Positano’s, on Hillspoint Road near Elvira’s, may soon go the way…

 

...of the old pavilion at Schlaet's Point, just around the curve closer to Soundview Drive.

…of the old pavilion at Schlaet’s Point, just around the curve close to Soundview Drive.

 

A Perfect Compo Morning

It’s mid-week, on a beautiful October morning.

Alert “06880” reader Valerie DiPrato headed to Compo Beach, to enjoy the perfect fall weather.

She was hardly alone. Plenty of other folks were there too — parked by the sand, enjoying the view.

Compo Beach morning

Valerie writes: “Compo Beach, we love you just the way you are!”

Compo Beach Plan Gets Rocky Reception

A member of the Compo Beach Master Plan Committee called last April’s public meeting — where opposition to new proposals, particularly perimeter parking, surfaced strongly — a “flash mob.”

Last night’s meeting at Town Hall — the 1st time the Parks and Recreation Commission reviewed the plan — was far less contentious. Citizens waited patiently through the consultants’ presentation of conceptual — not final — ideas, and a few commissioners’ questions, before speaking.

But when they spoke, they voiced a number of concerns.

As First Selectman Jim Marpe noted, Compo is used in “an amazing number of ways, and in common.” He spoke of the importance of investing in, upgrading and improving areas of the beach “where it makes sense.”

Compo Beach: a town jewel, beloved by all.

Compo Beach: a town jewel, beloved by all.

Introducing 2 plans — Options A and B — Consultants AKRF and Lothrop Associates expressed the hope that “everyone will like everything,” but cautioned, “no one will like everything.”

They sure didn’t.

Both plans show:

  • a new entrance across from Bradley Street, with permit pass-checking deeper into the beach than now exists
  • a driving loop around the beach, with perimeter pathways for walkers, joggers and bikers
  • an extended boardwalk, toward the cannons
  • exercise stations
  • upgraded bathrooms, lockers and Joey’s
  • redesigned marina promenade
  • unobstructed parking spaces
  • new trees
  • improved facilities (including a bathroom) on South Beach
  • a central lawn for picnics and special events, like Lobsterfest
  • new walkways along Soundview Drive and Compo Beach Road.

Option A pushes all parking back from the beach. Option B removes some of that, but allows some parking similar to what now exists on South Beach.

Both plans remove 200 to 300 parking spaces from the current number, which is around 1900.

Parking is one of the most contentious parts of the 2 beach proposals.

Parking is one of the most contentious parts of the 2 beach proposals.

Parks & Rec chair Charlie Haberstroh allowed youngsters to speak first. Several spoke eloquently and passionately of the need to retain the skate park. It does not appear in the current plans, but Parks & Rec director Stuart McCarthy said room could be made for it.

Then came comments from older folks. An early question covered costs. New buildings would run approximately $4 million; site work would be another $4 million. (Paving alone — included in site work — is about $2 million.)

Speakers zeroed in on specific concerns: Bradley Street will become more congested. The amount of asphalt and concrete that would be added to what are now “pervious” parking lots. The number of kayak racks that would be lost (none, McCarthy said).

Among the comments:

“You’re sacrificing 200 to 400 parking spaces for lawn and shrubs.”

“Parking and views are there 365 days a year. Traffic problems, they’re only 40 days or so.”

“I don’t understand all the talk about safety. The Sound is more dangerous than the beach.”

John Brandt referred back to an earlier speech. “You don’t fracture a gem,” the longtime Westporter said. “You polish it. We need to find a way to polish this gem.”

Compo Beach: a true town gem.

Compo Beach is a true town gem.

As Compo Beach Master Plan committee chair Andy Moss noted, plenty of dialogue and debate lie ahead. The Compo Beach proposals — which are still only design concepts — must still make their way through the Recreation Commission. Then comes the Planning and Zoning Commission, the selectmen, back to Parks & Rec, back to P&Z, and finally to the town’s funding bodies (Board of Finance and RTM).

Meanwhile, Westporters will continue to debate what they want — and don’t — for the town’s crown jewel.

The dialogue began last night. It can continue here. Click “Comments” — but please, be civil. Debate ideas; don’t castigate people. And use your full, real name.

Full House For Parks & Rec Meeting

It’s perhaps the biggest turnout ever for a Parks & Recreation Commission session.

And one of the biggest in memory for any public meeting.

The Town Hall full house turned out to hear — and comment on — 2 draft proposals for improvements to Compo Beach.

At 9:05 p.m., the public got to speak. Parks & Rec Commission chair Charlie Haberstroh gave the 1st slots to “anyone under 15 years old.” A number of teens advocated for the skate park, which is not in the current plans.

Another teenager, Theo Koskoff, said simply, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Plenty of other Westporters lined up to speak on other parts of the proposal, such as perimeter parking, the new entrance opposite Bradley Street, and changes to the marina.

A full report will appear in “06880” tomorrow morning.

But one thing was already clear: No one is planning to do anything to the cannons.

The scene at Town Hall.

The scene at Town Hall.

The Last Splash?

Earlier this month, “06880” reported that Positano’s — the restaurant at Old Mill — will be sold to a Greenwich developer. It will probably be torn down, and be rebuilt as a private home.

But word on the street — and the beach — is that’s it’s not the only waterfront restaurant in Westport set to close.

Splash’s demise has been rumored for several weeks.

Last night, an “06880” reader dined at the Longshore spot. Here’s her report:

Last night we had a very unfortunate evening at Splash. I think we may be seeing the beginning of the end for this beautiful Westport spot. Service was slow, but this was exceptional. One family stood up to leave because their meal hadn’t come. We were told that the majority of the staff walked out and they haven’t been paid for weeks.

Can you find out what’s going on? Imagine if we lose Splash?

“06880” will keep on this story. In the meantime: If you hear something, say something.

Will Splash live to see another Christmas?

Will Splash live to see another Christmas?

 

 

 

 

Fox On The Run

For over a century, Westporters have enjoyed Old Mill Beach.

But wildlife has been here longer than that. And — after decades away — it seems at least one species is back.

Robin Tauck owns a quintessential, weather-beaten home on Compo Cove. Yesterday, while enjoying perfect late-September weather, she spotted a large, seemingly wounded red fox.

The fox on Old Mill Beach. (Photo/Robin Tauck)

The fox on Old Mill Beach. (Photo/Robin Tauck)

He spent much of the afternoon “cruising the beach.”

As Robin noted, he was “cute, fast, limping and watchful.” He may also be rabid.

Some beachgoers were worried. Others, Robin said, thought it wonderful “to see and be mindful of our still-natural setting, and the species with whom we share our special environment.”

Be warned. Be careful.

But remember: The foxes were here first.